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June 30, 2016 / 24 Sivan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Cyprus’

Netanyahu’s Can Do Minister Plans Gaza’s Offshore Island Harbor

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

Yisrael Katz (Likud), who currently wears two ministerial hats: Transportation and Road Safety and Intelligence and Atomic Energy, has probably the most productive minister in Benjamin Netanyahu’s three consecutive cabinets, being responsible for an unprecedented network of new, modern highways crisscrossing Israel and an ever-improving train service — all of which means that if he has made up his mind to carry out a project, it’s probably going to happen, and sooner than you may think. The project in question is the Gaza harbor island, which Katz has recently begun to promote.

Speaking at the 2016 Herzliya Conference last week, Minister Katz described his plan for an island with a port off the Gaza Strip, connected to the mainland with a three-mile bridge, with no residential buildings, and, most important—no place for Hamas to dig terror tunnels. According to Katz, an artificial island to be built on the high seas would also be a spot which was “not promised by God to anyone,” with no ideological ties to any of the warring parties in the region. This island would be built strictly for humane and financial purposes: permit the monitored, daily flow of traffic in and out of Gaza, provide construction jobs for the people of Gaza, and, eventually, who knows, there’s room for many imaginative ventures once you’ve gotten yourself an island.

“We can practically change the current reality,” Katz promised last week. And on Monday he told reporters: “I do not think it is right to lock up two million people without any connection to the world. Israel has no interest in making life harder for the population there. But because of security concerns we can’t build an airport or seaport in Gaza [proper].”

This week, Minister Katz raised the heat under his proposal, announcing that Israel is actively seeking foreign investors to construct a $5 billion artificial island with a seaport, hotels and an airport just off the coast of the Gaza Strip. The island, comprising an area of three square miles (although once you start making islands in the sea, what’s to stop you from making them even bigger), would “ease the blockade it imposed on the Palestinian enclave a decade ago.”

Up until last week’s announcement, there were several alternative harbor proposals being discussed by the Israeli leadership, to help ease the pressure on Gaza’s civilian population without harming Israeli security. One was what seemed like an exotic idea a few months ago, of building an artificial island that would face the Gaza shore, where ships would unload their goods under strict Israeli control. One called for the harbor to be built in El Arish, a sleepy Egyptian town in the north-eastern Sinai, which is under Egyptian rule. There was also an idea to build a Gaza harbor in Cyprus. And, of course, there was the more intuitive idea of building the Gaza harbor in Gaza, but conditioning its operation on long-term ceasefire deals. Naturally, as soon as Hamas starts shooting rockets at Israel, Israel could wipe out their nice harbor.

Katz insists his man-made island proposal is under review by Netanyahu’s security cabinet, and showing “a lot of potential.” The experts are drafting plans on ways to maintaining security on the offshore island and inside the off-shore harbor. One tactic being proposed is closing down the bridge when hostilities flare up on the mainland. But with Hamas investing in training its Navy SEAL commandos, closing down the bridge may not necessarily secure the island.

Minister Katz wants the island to be built with foreign investments, and he would like to see the Saudis and the Chinese, as well as private Israeli investors picking up the tab for his project. Katz said Israel would allow foreign construction workers into its territorial waters for the project.

According to the Washington Post, citing a high level Israeli official, Prime Minister Netanyahu is “exploring the option but has not yet made a determination.”

The Palestinian Authority folks hate the plan, which they called “dubious.” The PLO fears that the man-made island would bring about “the final severing of Gaza” from the PA.

JNi.Media

Israel Among Top Five Countries on WHO 2015 Life Expectancy Chart

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Only 22 countries around the globe have reached an average life expectancy at birth greater than 80 years, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Health Observatory (GHO) data, which would suggest that if one is planning to retire abroad, one should consider those countries most seriously.

Life expectancy at birth reflects the overall mortality level of a population. It summarizes the mortality pattern that prevails across all age groups in a given year – children and adolescents, adults and the elderly. Global life expectancy at birth in 2015 was 71.4 years (73.8 years for females and 69.1 years for males), ranging from 60.0 years in the WHO African Region to 76.8 years in the WHO European Region, giving a ratio of 1.3 between the two regions. Women live longer than men all around the world. The gap in life expectancy between the sexes was 4.5 years in 1990 and had remained almost the same by 2015 (4.6).

Global average life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s. Those gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic, and in Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The 2000-2015 increase was greatest in the WHO African Region, where life expectancy increased by 9.4 years to 60 years, driven mainly by improvements in child survival, and expanded access to antiretrovirals for treatment of HIV.

As to the friendly global race of whose citizens get to live longer, the top countries are, in descending order: Japan – 83.7, Switzerland – 83.4, Singapore – 83.1, Italy – 82.7, and Israel – 82.5. The US did not make the 80+ club in 2015, with only 79.3 years’ life expectancy. Neither did the Russian Federation – 70.5.

Israel’s neighbors are definitely not ideal locations for retirement: Egypt – 70.9, Jordan – 74.1, Lebanon – 74.9, and Syria – 64.5 (if you’re lucky). Nigeria stands out with 54.5 life expectancy, along with Angola – 52.4, Burkina Faso – 59.9, Burundi – 59.6, Cameroon – 57.3, Central African Republic – 52.5, Chad – 53.1, Guinea – 59, and Guinea-Bissau – 58.9.

So, here is the list of world countries where you’ll get to grow older than 80, barring unexpected circumstances:

Japan – 83.7
Switzerland – 83.4
Singapore – 83.1
Italy – 82.7
Israel – 82.5
France – 82.4
Sweden – 82.4
Canada – 82.2
Luxembourg – 82
Netherlands – 81.9
Norway – 81.8
Malta – 81.7
New Zealand – 81.6
Austria – 81.5
Belgium – 81.1
Finland – 81.1
Germany – 81
Denmark – 80.6
Chile – 80.5
Cyprus – 80.5

JNi.Media

Arab Terrorists Open Fire at Qalandiya Checkpoint

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Arab terrorists opened fire Tuesday morning at IDF personnel at the Qalandiya checkpoint north of Jerusalem.

The attack took place during a visit to the outpost by a security team from Cyprus.

No injuries were reported. However, a bullet hit one of the military vehicles, according to the Hebrew-language 0404 website.

Israeli forces searched the area and raised the alert level. It appears the attack came from within Qalandiya.

Hana Levi Julian

Cypriot Police Arrest Hijacker of EgyptAir Flight 181

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

Cypriot authorities arrested the hijacker of EgyptAir Flight MS181 shortly after 2:30pm local time at Lanarca International Airport, according to the Cyprus Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He was wearing a wired-up explosives belt at the time of his arrest, as seen in a photo posted on social media.

The hijacker of EgyptAir Flight MS181 had demanded that Egypt release female prisoners incarcerated in the country, according to some international sources. He had also demanded to see his ex-wife, who apparently lives on the island of Cyprus, in the village of Oroklini, not far from the airport.

Although previously identified as Libyan national Ibrahim Samaha, Egypt’s Civil Aviation Minister told media the hijacker’s name is Seif Eldin Mustafa. A passenger with dual U.S.-Egyptian citizenship who disembarked told the BBC that his name was Ibrahim Samaha, lending credence to the Egyptian minister’s statement.

The pilot was ordered to divert the plane from its route after its 8 am departure from Alexandria towards Cairo, landing at 8:46 am at Lanarca International Airport.

The hijacker initially asked Cypriot authorities for political asylum but there was no immediately response to the request. A Cypriot official boarded the plane to speak with the hijacker at approximately 11:03 am local time. He allegedly had also demanded to be flown to Istanbul, but was told by Captain Omar al-Gamal there was not enough fuel to reach that destination, according to Egyptian government spokesperson Hossein al-Queish, who spoke with CBC-TV.

Most of the passengers were released at midday. The pilot, co-pilot, a flight attendant and a security officer, as well as three foreign passengers of unknown nationality remained on the plane until nearly 2 pm.

The plane was hijacked early Tuesday morning shortly after its 8 am departure, according to the airline’s spokesperson. The A320 was originally reported to be carrying 81 passengers aboard upon departure from Borg El Arab Airport, but Egyptian aviation authorities said the aircraft was carrying 55 passengers and five crew members.

Israel’s Air Force scrambled fighter jets to ensure there would be no penetration into Israeli air space following the hijacking, according to Channel 2 News. When the aircraft landed at Lanarca International Airport, the IAF jets returned to base.

The Cairo government has been battling an uprising by the Sinai Province branch of the Da’esh (ISIS) terrorist organization (formerly the Sinai-based Ansar Beyt al-Maqdis terror group) since the July 2013 ouster of Muslim Brotherhood-backed former Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi.

On November 23, 1985, Islamist terrorists hijacked EgyptAir Flight 648. During that incident, 58 people lost their lives.

Hana Levi Julian

Ya’alon: Iranian Appetite to Arm Terrorists Will Grow

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon issued a blunt warning Tuesday about the budding axis of evil in the region being formed by Iran, and its continuing active support for terror activity.

Speaking to reporters during a working visit to Cyprus on Wednesday, Ya’alon pointed out that Tehran has not stopped arming the Lebanese Hezbollah terrorist group. He also noted that Hezbollah has tried to set up terror cells in Cyprus this past year as well – attempts that were foiled by Cypriot security forces.

“The State of Israel views Cyprus as a true friend. Relations between the defense establishments, militaries, and intelligence communities go back years, are deep, and important,” Ya’alon said.

Ya’alon signed a Status of Force agreement on Wednesday together with his Cypriot counterpart. The document strengthens cooperation between the militaries of the two nations.

The Israeli defense minister told reporters that “true friends” are becoming more important as the region becomes more unstable. In fact, Ya’alon said the region may be on the verge of launching World War III.

“Syria has turned into a playground in which powers play, as do terror organizations and the states that activate them. The situation is chaotic, not only in Syria but in other states in the Middle East, and it influences not only the area, but the whole of Europe…

“We are in the midst of a war between cultures. In a certain sense, this is a third world war, [albeit] in a different manner from what we have known,” he added. Any state prepared to help Israel in stabilizing the situation will find “a partner in us, including states we have no relations with,” Ya’alon said.

Iran is a main force driving this impending cyclone, he added.

“The Iranian regime, through the proxies it trains, funds, and arms, is trying to undermine stability in the Middle East and beyond.

“It attempts to spread the revolution, and stops at nothing, including ambitions to build a dangerous axis, which starts in Tehran, moves through Baghdad, Damascus, Beirut, Sana’a, and other regional states,” Ya’alon said.

“Thus, the Iranian appetite to arm terror organizations that obey them, including Hamas and Hezbollah, will grow. The Iranians are trying to arm Hezbollah all of the time, including attempts that have occurred recently,” he said.

“The Western world must act with determination against the threat, since this common threat, whose values and ways are the opposite of ours, strives to disrupt our lives and create a reality we must not agree to.”

Hana Levi Julian

Russian Navy’s First Port Visit to Egypt in 21 Years

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

Suddenly, even Vladimir Putin looks more attractive.  He looks, at least, like he actually intends to fight radical Islamism – in some of its varieties anyway.  In theory, he has some pull with Iran.  He can exert a certain level of “check” on the Syria crisis.  His relatively well armed nation sits on the other side of Erdogan’s wild-card Turkey, which keeps bouncing from China to Iran to NATO and back again.  He’s not “Europe” – not really – but “Europe” acknowledges that he has to be given a place at the table.

Maybe he doesn’t look attractive, exactly; maybe the word is interesting.  Whatever it is, it’s showing up in real forms now, in regional nations’ decisions in the Eastern Mediterranean.  Last week came the flurry of reports that Putin would visit Egypt in November and announce a major arms sale, which will inevitably serve as something of a counter-smack to the U.S. decision to halt arms deliveries to Egypt a few weeks ago.

The newer news is from Monday, November 11, when Russia’s Slava-class missile cruiser Varyag pulled into Alexandria for the Russian navy’s first port visit in Egypt since 1992.  Pundits of varying quality have rushed to speculate that Moscow will soon have the use of Egyptian ports as bases in the region.  I doubt that; Egypt is too anxious to retain her stature and independence of action – properly so – and doesn’t “need” to accord Russia such privileges to keep useful ties going between the two of them.

In the current, comparative disarray of some Arab governments in the region, Egypt’s actually looks solid and moderate, and has the overt support of Saudi Arabia and Jordan, as well as the tacit support of Israel – all of which are well armed, well connected regional powers with common interests in a status quo.  The situation over which Al-Sisi presides is different from that of the Nasser regime in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was so eager for the great-power patronage of the erstwhile Soviet Union.

Russia, for her part, is unlikely to press this issue.  Between Syria, Greece, Cyprus, Montenegro, and Malta, the Russian navy has a lot of options now for making temporary landfalls for logistics.  Moscow wouldn’t necessarily even save money by concluding more literal “basing” agreements in the Mediterranean.

But I’m sure we can expect to see the Russian navy welcomed in Egyptian ports.  This makes a noteworthy, and regrettable, contrast with the U.S. Navy, which has been scarce in Egyptian ports in recent years – in spite of our two nations’ close relationship – largely because of the threat of terrorism.

Egypt, meanwhile, isn’t the only nation to roll out the welcome mat for the Russian navy in the past year.  In May, the Russian amphibious ship Azov arrived in Haifa for the first port visit ever by a Russian navy ship to Israel.  Russia and Israel have of course found some common ground in their opposition to radical Islamism, and the Netanyahu government has had a robust program of diplomatic outreach to Russia since it took over in the spring of 2009.  After Putin visited Jerusalem in June 2012 to pray for the rebuilding of the Temple, a naval port visit could hardly have been far behind.

Russian warships also visited Lebanon in March 2013, an exceedingly rare occurrence.  According to Russia’s defense ministry, the visit involved a frigate and two amphibious ships, and signified no intention on Moscow’s part to establish any permanent basing arrangement.

Cyprus hosted multiple visits by Russian warships in 2013, fueling the usual speculation that Moscow is negotiating for basing rights on the island.  (See here for more on Russia’s strategic approach to Cyprus.)  It has become routine in the last few years for Russian navy ships to visit ports in Greece and Malta.  Russian officials announced earlier this year that the navy’s newly constituted (or, in effect, reconstituted) Mediterranean squadron would use a port in Montenegro as well, referring to the port of Tivat (which for many years during the Cold War was a Yugoslav navy base, used as a Mediterranean base by the Soviet navy).  A September 2013 press release on the upcoming activities of amphibious landing ship Yamal indicated the ship would visit Greece and Montenegro this fall.

J. E. Dyer

Upping the Ante: 5 Russian Warships Enter the Mediterranean

Friday, May 17th, 2013

In its latest escalation of the international anxiety over the Syrian civil war, Russia announced on Thursday that a group of five warships from its Pacific Fleet have entered the Mediterranean sea to bolster a new regional task force, according to a fleet spokesman quoted on the state-owned news agency RIA Novosti.

“The task force has successfully passed through the Suez Canal and entered the Mediterranean. It is the first time in decades that Pacific Fleet warships enter this region,” Capt. First Rank Roman Martov said.

Novosti said the warships’ immediate destination was Limassol, on the island of Cyprus, where they will join Russia’s Mediterranean task force.

An official from the Russian Embassy in Beirut confirmed to the Daily Star of Lebanon that the ships were indeed in the Mediterranean, adding that it was merely a routine procedure.

First such routine procedure since 1992.

Russia maintains a military base in the port of Tartous, Syria.

Novosti said the vessels – including the destroyer Admiral Panteleyev, the amphibious warfare ships Peresvet and Admiral Nevelskoi, and a tanker and a tug – left the port of Vladivostok on March 19. The Russian plan to expand its naval presence near Syria was announced in April.

A permanent naval task force in the Mediterranean was needed to defend Russia’s interests in the region, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said in March.

It’s like the Cold War never ended.

According to Novosti, a senior Defense Ministry official said the Mediterranean task force’s command and control agencies will be based either in Novorossiysk, Russia, or in Sevastopol, Ukraine.

The U.S. Navy’s 6th Fleet maintains its own permanent presence in the Mediterranean.

Yori Yanover

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/upping-the-ante-5-russian-warships-enter-the-mediterranean/2013/05/17/

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