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July 6, 2015 / 19 Tammuz, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Damascus’

Nasrallah’s Golan Heights Mughniyeh Appointment Angers Jealous Hezbollah Terrorists

Saturday, June 27th, 2015

The Saudi news-site Al-Watan reports that Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah has appointed the young Mustafa Mughniyah (Mugniyeh) to take command of Hezbollah’s forces on the Syrian side of the Golan Heights, according to NRG.

The job involves both fighting to protect Syrian president Assad’s regime, as well as setting up the terror infrastructure with which to attack Israel.

Mustafa replaces his older brother, Jihad, who was killed on the Golan Heights, along with some Iranian generals, in a reported Israeli air strike in January of this year.

Mustafa’s father, Imad Mughniyah, a former senior Hezbollah leader, aka “The Chief of Staff, was assassinated in a 2008 car bombing in Damascus.

Danny Yatom, former head of the Israeli Mossad said: “He was one of the most dangerous terrorists ever on Earth.”

The U.S. State Department said of Imad: “The world is a better place without this man in it. He was a coldblooded killer, a mass murderer and a terrorist responsible for countless innocent lives lost. One way or another he was brought to justice.”

The report in Al-Watan and in Kuwaiti papers says the appointment of Mustafa has angered senior Hezbollah officials who feel that Mustafa has no experience, and since the Golan Heights is such a difficult and sensitive area, they are worried he will make serious mistakes to Hezbollah’s detriment.

They are also upset that Nasrallah appears to be promoting members of the Mughniyah family at their expense.

UN Soldiers Illegally Occupy Handicapped Parking Spots in Katzrin

Friday, June 5th, 2015

The town of Katzrin on the Golan Heights has a problem.

It’s a popular town among UN Peacekeepers stationed up in Israel’s north, but for an organization that is so obsessed with international law (at least their interpretation of it when it comes to Israel), they completely disregard the law when it comes to following it themselves.

The Katzrin regional council has recently been dealing with UN soldiers who completely and purposely ignore parking regulations.

The UN soldiers illegally park in no-parking zones. They illegally park on the sidewalks. Most disgustingly, they illegally park and take over entire handicapped parking areas, as you can see in the photo above.

Dmitry (Dimi) Apartsev, the mayor of the Katzrin regional council, told Makor Rishon that Katzrin is happy to host the UN soldiers who recently moved their command center over to Katzrin after being chased out of Syria, but he would appreciate if they respected local laws a bit more.

He added, he also wouldn’t mind if they updated their business cards to say Katzrin instead of Damascus.

Apartsev has sent numerous letters to UNDOF to intervene with the local soldiers, to no avail.

The town even printed up special stickers to stick onto the UN vehicles parked in the handicapped parking spots, but that’s not working either.

The UN soldiers have diplomatic immunity, so there aren’t many legal steps the town can take against them, even as the UN repeatedly breaks the law.

The police can give them tickets all day long, but the town has no way to force the UN to actually pay the fines.

The Ramifications of ISIS’ Conquest of Palmyra

Monday, June 1st, 2015

I first got to visit the magnificent ancient site of Palmyra on a family trip as a teenager. Getting to the desert town by car was, back in the nineties an absurdly arduous journey with only a single two-lane road connecting it to the rest of Syria. But the ancient Roman ruins more than made up for the difficult trip. Experiencing their splendor first hand, I could see why their images featured prominently on Syria’s currency.

Years later, I made a point of taking my younger brothers to visit the ruins once they were old enough to appreciate them. Fifteen years after my first visit, the road to Palmyra was still as atrocious as ever, and the nearby town of Tadmor hadn’t developed much in the intervening years, but the ruins themselves were as magnificent as ever. Had they been more accessible, they would have rivaled Egypt’s Pyramids for sheer number of visitors.

Sadly, the ancient city would eventually succumb to the ravages of the conflict tearing Syria apart, and the town of Tadmor, with its population having swelled to five times its pre-conflict numbers with displaced persons, has fallen to Da’esh — the Islamic State (ISIS). The prospects for both the town’s inhabitants and its famous ruins could not be any bleaker, judging by ISIS’ past behavior in Iraq and the east of Syria.

It is impossible to overstate the dire implications of the Islamic State’s conquest of the city. Culturally, Palmyra has been the crown jewel of Syria’s heritage; its loss is akin to the United Kingdom losing Stonehenge.

Militarily and strategically, ISIS’ control of this central Syrian city is a monumental and disastrous setback to all the efforts undertaken to defeat the extremist group. Despite being subjected to months of air bombardments on the part of an American-led coalition, ISIS is now well positioned to strike at Syria’s major population centers in the western provinces of Homs, Hama and Damascus.

In theory, the armies of Bashar Assad based in Tadmor should have been able to easily fend off any conceivable attack by ISIS. The place is surrounded by open desert, supplied by a nearby airport, with a garrison at Tadmor’s infamous prison, a place that, pre-conflict, represented the worse horrors and brutalities of the Baathist dictatorship, but had since been surpassed by dozens of equally brutal prisons and dungeons all over the country. It put the Syrian Army in the enviable position of defending against an ISIS force that was far from its main areas of control, with highly vulnerable and exposed supply lines. The logistics of the battle were heavily in favor of the regime.

But the Syrian Army’s sudden and unexpected collapse in the face of ISIS’ offensive serves to illustrate the high toll the conflict has taken on the army and the degree to which it has been degraded as a fighting force. The regime’s swift defeat also highlights the unfortunate fact that ISIS remains very much a dangerous force.

Tadmor was the first town that the extremist group managed to conquer directly from President Bashar al-Assad’s forces. For years, the regime had comforted itself with the fact that ISIS’ main focus was to battle rebel brigades in areas the regime considered to be of secondary strategic importance.

With its conquest of Tadmor, ISIS can no longer be regarded as a group whose influence is confined to the periphery of the country. The regime’s collapse at Tadmor — despite its strategic advantages in the area — is the final nail in the coffin of the idea that a Western alliance with Assad can jointly take on the Islamic State.

Syrian Rebel Forces Closing in on Damascus Airport

Saturday, May 9th, 2015

Syrian Rebel forces continue to close in on the Damascus airport, approaching within 7 kilometers, breaking through the railway front line and taking most of Deir Salman, according to the Syrian Rebels Twitter feed..

Dozens Killed in Strategic Syrian Qalamoun Battles

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

Arab sources report that dozens of combatants from both Hezbollah and Free Syrian Army/Jabhat al-Nusra (the Syrian Rebels) have been killed in ongoing fierce fighting in the Qalamoun region. The battle has been dubbed “The Spring Battle” by Arab media.

The area, along the Syrian-Lebanon border is strategically critical. It controls the Lebanon-Damascus supply pipelines and is how Hezbollah supports Bashar Assad’s army and regime in Damascus.

If Assad/Hezbollah loses control of the area, Damascus is more likely to fall to the Syrian Rebels. It will also cut off Assad’s Alawite region in northwest Syria from from Damascus too.

Hezbollah believes that if Assad falls, so will they.

Assad is unable to send significant, if any, forces to assist in this battle, and his army is stretched thin in other areas, in particular around Damascus, which is a primary target for the Syrian Rebels.

At the moment, it is believed that the Syrian Rebel forces are winning in the Qalamoun region.

A source close to Hezbollah told Reuters that Nasrallah has deployed 85% of his combat forces to fight in Syria, leaving only 5% of his forces on the border with Israel.

A Lebanese paper claims that 1500 Hezbollah terrorists have been killed since they joined in the fighting in Syrian’s civil war.

The number of senior Hezbollah commanders killed in Qalmoun fighting has risen to six.

PLO Won’t Fight in Yarmouk, as Left Call to Flood Israel with Refugees

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

Commissioner-General Pierre Krähenbühl, the head of UNRWA, left to visit Syria on Saturday to discuss the situation in Yarmouk, a ‘Palestinian’ refugee camp in Damascus, Syria, established in 1957, and actually a suburb of Damascus, with real buildings, streets and infrastructure, and not a tent city as the name implies.

All the relief workers have fled the neighborhood since Islamic State invaded, and the situation in the neighborhood has been described as “beyond inhumane”.

Reading through the purposefully vague wording of the official UNRWA press release, it appears that Krähenbühl will not actually visit the Yarmouk neighborhood, though it tries to give off the impression that he would.

On April 1, Islamic State (Da’esh) attacked and overran Yarmouk, a suburb in southern Damascus, fighting the local Hamas-affiliated terror group, Bait al-Maqdis, that controlled the neighorhood.

There is another terror group in the Sinai also named Bait al-Maqdis, who are thought to have had connections with Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, but have since sworn allegiance to Islamic State.

Da’esh took over most of the southern Damascus neighborhood, and were reportedly assisted by members of Jabhat Al-Nusra who helped get them in.

Two years ago, Yarmouk had over 200,000 residents, but now they are down to less than 18,000. The neighborhood has been under siege by pro-Assad’s troops for the past two years. The PLO and other ‘Palestinian’ factions were among the first to flee in 2013.

Islamic State said they came in to liberate the residents from Assad’s siege.

On Friday, the Palestinian Authority/PLO has made it clear they have absolutely no intention of helping their compatriots militarily, contradicting an AP report quoting the PLO envoy to Damascus, Ahmad Majdalani, who said the PLO would join sides with the Syrian government to expel Da’esh from the Yarmouk neighborhood.

The PLO says it refuses “to be drawn into any armed campaign.” The Palestinian Authority has been undecided as to which side it should support in the Syrian civil war.

According to Al Jazeera,

Wasel Abu Yousef, a senior PLO official based in the West Bank town of Ramallah, said Friday that negotiating safe passage for Yarmouk’s besieged residents and for humanitarian supplies is preferable to military action.

Of course, since Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey are refusing to allow most ‘Palestinian’ refugees to enter their countries, it’s not clear where the safe passage would actually take them, except outside the latest immediate battle zone.

Left-wing groups in Israel have launched a new campaign to flood Israel with tens (hundreds?) of thousands of Yarmouk “Palestinian refugees” for “humanitarian” reasons, since their fellow Arabs and Muslims refuse to help them and grant them refuge.

Left-wing ideologues are trying to use the Yarmouk crisis to radically change the demographics of Judea and Samaria, while saying that Israel should ignore the political consequences of such an action.

In the Jerusalem Post, Gershon Baskin writes, “This is not the time to score political points… Israel should announce immediately its willingness to have those 18,000 remaining residents of Yarmouk come to the West Bank.”

A Haaretz Editorial wrote, “Israel could offer Abbas the possibility of absorbing some of the refugees into the Palestinian Authority… Political considerations and disputes with the PA should be set aside at this time.”

Islamic State’s control of Yarmouk gives Da’esh a strong foothold in Damascus, which they haven’t had before.

For the Israeli far-Left, their “solution” to this crisis aligns perfectly with their ongoing political agenda to get rid of Israeli control over historic Judea and Samaria – some might say, almost cynically so.

Islamic State Posts Photos of Beheaded of Arabs UNRWA Refugee Camp

Monday, April 6th, 2015

The Islamic State (ISIS) has posted sickening pictures of a reported 21 victims its murderers have beheaded in the UNRWA-run Yarmouk refugee camp near downtown Damascus.

An imam was said to have been one of the victims, and it is possible UNRWA personnel also were among those butchered. Scores of others were  killed or wounded by barrel bombs dropped by the Assad regime’s planes in an  effort to force the ISIS to retreat.

“There is no food, there is no water and there is very little medicine,” said U.N.  Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) spokesman Chris Gunness. “The situation in the camp is beyond inhumane. People are holed up in their houses; there is fighting going on in the streets. There are reports of … bombardments.”

The Yarmouk camp is one of dozens set up by UNRWA in the past decades to keep Arabs stateless and in institutionalized misery for the sake of the Arab world hope of using them as tools to  overrun Israel on the basis of the claim that their refugee status is due to Israeli residency by previous generations.

However, the miserable life in the camps and even the ISIS takeover of Yarmouk have not aroused Arab sympathies.

Knesset Arab Knesset Member Ahmed Tibi said Monday, “I am angry and deeply saddened about what is happening in what is left of the camp.”

But he also tried to create a scenario that the Yarmouk refugees are being ignored because they are “Palestinians,” although hundreds of thousands of Arabs in Lebanon and Iraq have been killed and left homeless because of the savage civil war in Syria and which is beginning to spread over its borders.

Using the same Arab word for “catastrophe,” as most Arabs call the re-establishment of the State of Israel, Tibi said that Yarmouk is “another case where the refugees who suffered in the Nakba of 1948 are suffering again.”

But he never even thought of blaming the United Nations, which does not pass on the status of “refugee’ to any second generation in the world except for the few hundred thousands of Arab who once lived in Israel and who now number more than 5 million.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/middle-east/islamic-state-posts-photos-of-beheaded-of-arabs-unrwa-refugee-camp/2015/04/06/

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