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December 18, 2014 / 26 Kislev, 5775
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Daylight Savings Time’

Israel Falls Back Tonight

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

Israel changes it clocks Sunday morning at 2 AM (pushing them back to 1 AM), temporarily making the time difference between NY and Israel 6 hours instead of 7, until the US changes its clocks in 2 weeks time.

About time too, because we’ve been waking up before the sun comes up.

Moving Back the Clocks Gives Bibi and Abbas Perfect Excuse Not to Meet

Monday, September 29th, 2014

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority chairman Mahmoud Abbas have the perfect chance to announce a meeting next month, at the same hour that the Palestinian Authority moves back to standard time while Israel remains on daylight time.

Daylight time, or “summer time” as it is known in Israel, ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, October 26, two days after the Palestinian Authority changes its clocks at midnight on Thursday, October 24.  Just to confuse you, the United States turns back the clock on Sunday, November 2.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is missing his golden opportunity to push ISIS out of the headlines with a dramatic announcement that Netanyahu and Abbas will meet at a midnight October 24.

Abbas would show up, wait around with Kerry for half an hour and then shout at him that Netanyahu’s no-show proves that Israel is not interested in peace.

Thirty minutes later, with Abbas long gone and Kerry on the phone screaming his head off at Netanyahu, the Prime Minister would show up at midnight according to the Israeli clock, only to find that he has no one to speak with except Kerry, probably the worse of two evils.

Nevertheless, Netanyahu would complain that Abbas’ no-show proves that the Palestinian Authority is not interested in peace.

The mix-up would give Kerry a wonderful chance to throw up his hands, go back to President Barack Obama and ask his boss to teach him how to lose at golf instead of losing face.

But don’t count on it.

Kerry doesn’t give up that easily. He will launch a new proposal for the Palestinian Authority and Israel to sit down and negotiate on when to move clocks forward and backward every year.

It’s all because of the Occupation.

Turn Back Those Israeli Clocks Tonight

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

After weeks of waking up to predawn darkness, following a bitter political battle that had everyone using more electricity in the mornings, Israel is finally turning back the clocks one hour, on Sunday morning at 2 AM (to 1 AM).

In the past, the fight over Daylight Savings Time usually resulted in a Haredi victory, where the clocks would be turned back right before Yom Kippur, shortening the perceived time of the fast by one hour. But as a result, it left Sukkot vacationers with an hour less daylight for trips.

The Hilonim (secular) claimed that there would be tremendous savings in electricity by delaying the clock changing until late October, and it had the added advantage of sticking it to the religious.

This year, the Hilonim won, and for weeks now, most of the country have been getting up and getting dressed in complete darkness, waiting for the sun to rise, even to the point where children were catching school buses just after dawn. It’s hard to say there was any electrical savings when everyone had to turn on all the lights in the house an hour before dawn, just to pretend morning actually arrived.

One can only hope that someone in charge learned a lesson from this idiocy, and it doesn’t repeat itself next year.

And while they’re at it, three months of summer vacation was way too much too, maybe it’s time for all schools to start on Rosh Chodesh Elul.

It’s Official: Israel to Fast on Yom Kippur like Americans

Monday, July 8th, 2013

Israelis will fast on Yom Kippur this year just like Americans, starting and finishing the fast one hour later due to Daylight Savings Time, known in Israel as summer time, remaining in effect until the end of October.

The Knesset Monday night overwhelmingly voted for the change, ending years of arguments between secular Jews, who want a longer period of an extra hour of daylight just like most of the world, and religious leaders who have argued that continuing the fast later in the evening will cause many people to break the prohibition against eating or drinking on the holy day.

In the past, Daylight Time ended the week before Yom Kippur, and the fast would began around 5 p.m. and end around 6 p.m.

Similarly, Daylight Time used to be postponed until after the Passover holiday so that families would not have to extend the traditional family Seder meal until the later hours, when children were more likely to have fallen asleep instead of participating in the observance. The clocks now move forward at the end of March, regardless of when Passover begins.

“If people can’t pray because of the [new] law, we’ll discuss it again,” commented  Likud Knesset Member Miri Regev in the Knesset.

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu said at last week’s Cabinet meeting, where the measure was approved along with the proposal for exporting natural gas, “We now have a land flowing with milk, gas and sunshine.”

Cabinet Okays Extending Daylight Savings Time

Sunday, June 23rd, 2013

The Cabinet on Sunday approved a measure to extend Daylight Savings Time until the end of October. It also approved exporting 40 percent of natural gas, and the two decisions prompted Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu to remark, “Now we have a land flowing with milk and honey, gas and sunlight.”

The latest change concerning when Israel moves its clocks backwards puts an end to a long-time argument that has pitted Haredi and many national religious rabbis against the secular community.

Many rabbis have objected to extending “summer time” beyond the day before Yom Kippur because it would mean the 25-hour fast, although starting later in the evening, also would end around 7 p.m. after a hot day and may cause people to ignore the commandment to fast.

The Knesset last year approved changing the law and extending “summer time” until the end of September, Yom Kippur often falls in October, but the new proposed change would eliminate that possibility.

The government is expected to bring the bill to the Knesset for preliminary and final passage in time for it to take effect this year.

With Haredim Out of Govt. Summer Clock Will Be Stretched

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

Israel Daylight Savings Time (DST) has long been a bone of contention between the religious and the secular communities. The extended summer clock is a major problem for religious Jews. I recall, back in New York, heading to the early minyan in pitch darkness in mid October, which was never enjoyable and also presented a problem in terms of when it was halachically appropriate to put on a tallit. Needless to say, I gravitated to the later minyanim, but that’s a luxury religious Jews in Israel cannot afford, as the work day here begins at 8 AM, and so they need to be done and in the car going to work by 7.

Traditionally, the Interior Ministry, which decides these things, has been held, more often than not, by a religious minister, and so, despite vociferous objections from secular Israelis who wanted their autumn days longer, DST usually ended here right before or right after the high holidays (nothing sweeter than a Yom Kippur fast that ends at 6 PM).

But now, following the great Lapid-Bennett victory, the new Interior Minister is Gideon Sa’ar, a secular Likudnik, who is bent on flexing some secular muscle on DST.

A committee that had been appointed by the outgoing Shas Interior Minister Eli Yishai—because the secular folks were pushing him relentlessly—extended the maximum DST period from 190 to 198 days, which the religious promptly protested but eventually accepted.

Now Minister Saar has appointed yet another committee to examine the issue, which should submit its report within a month, according to Yedioth Aharonoth, and if you don’t think it will recommend extending the daylight savings period then you haven’t listened to a word I’ve been telling you about Israeli coalition politics..

Haredi politicians from both black hat parties were smart enough to refuse to comment on the prospects of a longer DST, preferring not to ignite a new firestorm over this issue—which they couldn’t possibly put out. The votes are stacked against them.

For comparison, in Europe the summer clock is stretched over 218 days, and in the U.S. a whopping 239 days, which makes you wonder if the measly 126 winter clock period deserves to be named “Standard.”

Minister Saar wrote on his Facebook page yesterday: “The purpose of the committee is simple, to determine the best arrangement for the citizens of Israel, having examined all relevant aspects. I instructed the committee to hold hearings quickly and efficiently, in an effort to complete them within a month.”

And vote in favor of the secular.

This is one more area where the Israeli—and European—notion of democracy differs from the Anglo-Saxon. Over here, democracy means making sure the will of the majority is expressed in government decisions. In British-influenced civilized democracies, the purpose of legislation is to protect the interests of the minority.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/with-haredim-out-of-govt-summer-clock-will-be-stretched/2013/04/22/

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