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April 21, 2014 / 21 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Dear Tanya’

Fit And Trim

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Dear Tanya,

There are some diet delivery services that are kosher. Do you recommend I try them? In the past, one of the reasons I had a hard time sticking to a diet was because I hate preparing for myself, and when life gets hectic I just don’t have the time.

Signed,
Do I?

Dear Do I?,

From what you are saying, it sounds like you would benefit from this type of service. Many women would prepare a three course, customized meal for any member of their family, but when it comes to ourselves, we get lazy and find every excuse not to do it. With a kosher diet home delivery service, all the work is done for you. Although the price may seem high, it really isn’t if you consider how much you spend on groceries and take out. Plus, long term you save money – if it works for you then you won’t have to keep spending money on a nutritionist or a fitness program. The key is not to eat anything outside of these meals (unless it is required in the program). Be sure to do your research, as not all the diet services are the same. Find a program recommended by a qualified nutritionist and make sure the food is not only kosher, but tasty as well so that you enjoy it.

Dear Tanya,

I’m wondering if it’s possible to target a specific area of my body, without working other areas. I am short on time so when I exercise, I want to target the areas that bother me the most.

In need of target

Dear in need of target,

As good as it may sound, the results of targeting specific areas for reducing or even muscle building, are usually disappointing and often prove to be of little or no use. The only body part that shows any real potential for spot training are the ab muscles. The reason is that the storage areas for your excessive weight are predetermined and genetically imprinted. These areas are the first to show gains and last to show losses. This is not to say you cannot lose fat in these areas, but change require an approach that burns calories overall, which, in turn, affects these specific areas. Spot building by targeting a certain muscle or muscle group can have slight benefits, but the results are more often marginal due again to individual genetics. The best way then to see results is to eat a good healthy diet, and to make sure that your workout includes fat burning cardio as well as toning for all areas of your body.

Dear Tanya,

How do I get more energy? I am so tired all the time. I tried coffee and even caffeine pills and they don’t seem to help much, maybe just a bit short term. Any suggestions?

In need of energy

Dear In need of energy,

Your energy throughout the day is affected by many different factors. The most common include overall health, mental stress, sleeping patterns, activity/inactivity, diet, prescriptions, drugs & alcohol.

Sleep: Obviously, if you are not sleeping well, your energy levels will be directly affected. We need 6-8 hours of sleep per day. Though everyone is a little different, most of us fall into this category. If you are not sleeping at least 6 hours a day, you are most likely dealing with sleep deprivation.

Stress: Not allowing your mind to relax from everyday concerns at the job, at home, in life, relationships and uncontrollable events will deplete your body’s immune response and make you susceptible to increased sickness/illness/disease as well as rob you of daily energy levels.

Activity: We need to be active enough to sleep better & lessen stress, as well as increase our metabolism, which in turn provides more energy. The more active you become, the more energetic you feel (as long as you get sufficient rest between workouts). The increase in activity also burns more calories, which assists in weight loss.

Diet: Your diet has enormous effects on your energy levels throughout the day. It is advisable to start every morning with a full glass of water, some type of fruit or yogurt, or oatmeal. Few of us have an hour-long lunch. But for those who do, this is an ideal time to get some energy through activity. If possible, get in a 40-minute workout/walk/jog/run or 30 minute swim/aerobic type class followed by a 10 minute cool down. Lunch can be taken back to the site, office or desk for leisurely consumption.

Fit And Trim

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Welcome to a new column where you can ask anything you’ve always wanted to know about diet, health, or fitness – and get your questions answered! Feel free to send your questions to Tanya magazine@jewishpress.com.

Dear Tanya,

I have been exercising for a few weeks now and although I feel a change in my body, the scale has not moved! Why is that? I thought exercise was supposed to help you lose weight!

Frustrated at the scale

Dear Frustrated at the scale,

Exercise alone does not necessarily make you lose weight, but it will help you slim down and reshape your body by decreasing fat and increasing muscle. Regular exercise:

* Helps you burn calories that you have consumed during meals
* Helps combat muscle loss that can occur when you lose weight
* Builds up your muscle tissue
* Increases the amount of calories that you burn. The more muscular you are, the more calories you burn.

Remember that exercising does not always lead to weight loss (muscle weighs more than fat), but your body will be more toned and slimmer (you will fit into your clothes better). In addition, exercise is an excellent way to relieve tension.

I would suggest that you also take a look at your eating habits and consider making some changes. I recommend you do this with a qualified nutritionist so that the evaluation is as objective and accurate as possible. Meanwhile, definitely keep exercising!

Dear Tanya,

My doctor kept talking to me about my BMI and its importance. I didn’t feel comfortable asking him to explain what it’s all about. Can you?

BMI confused

Dear BMI confused,

Don’t be confused, I’ll explain! The body mass index (BMI) is a simple way for men and women to estimate body fat based on their height and weight. From the BMI chart, it is possible to determine your healthy weight range.

For the majority of Americans, the BMI is the most up-to-date and scientifically sound method available for determining healthy weight. One of the limitations of BMI is that it can over-predict overweight or obesity in people who are lean and muscular.

It is important to know that people who are classified as overweight or obese can still be healthy as long as they are fit. In one well-known study, fit people with BMIs that classified them as overweight or obese were healthier and lived longer than unfit people who were at normal weight.

Hope this is helpful!

Dear Tanya,

I want to get more tight and toned, but I’m afraid that lifting weights will create a manly look, or bulk, any suggestions?

Afraid of bulk

Dear Afraid of bulk,

A common concern for many women is the misconception that lifting weights will cause you to become physically bigger and more bulky. This concern hinders them from getting many of the advantages of weight resistance exercising. Keep in mind that unless you specifically train to target for bigger muscles, weight lifting will not result in large muscle mass gains. I really recommend you work with a qualified personal trainer to teach you the correct way to lift weights for the results that you want. With weight training, getting it right is extremely important. It is not enough to just go through the motions.

You will also benefit by continuing to focus on improving sleep patterns, using stress reduction techniques and choosing a better diet.

Dear Tanya,

What is the real deal with Splenda and artificial sweeteners? I really enjoy the calorie free way to enjoy my foods and beverages. Lately, there is a lot of negative hype them and my friends and family say I’m consuming too much, and it is dangerous! Can you clarify?

Scared of splenda

Dear Scared of splenda,

I’m sorry to break it to you, but your friends and family are pretty on target.

The FDA approved the substance as safe for human consumption in 1998 after the effects were studied on over 100 animals and humans – but only two of the subjects were actually human. Thus yet another artificial sweetener was born, putting people’s health at risk through marketing and profit-driven goals. What comes as the greatest surprise, however, is the fact that all of the testing done with Sucralose was completed on about 40 people – and much of the studies’ goals were only to test its effects on the subject’s teeth. So, is Splenda safe?

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/fit-and-trim/2012/08/10/

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