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November 22, 2014 / 29 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Deir Yassin’

It’s A ‘Deir Yassin’ in Syria

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Assad is really in trouble now:

At least 10 Palestinian refugees were killed Wednesday in the Yarmouk refugee camp in Damascus, activists posting to a Facebook account for the camp reported.

According to media from the camp, 15-year-old Jalal Yousif Salih was shot dead by a Syrian government sniper near the Palestine Hospital in the camp. Photos of the victim were published before he was identified.  Another victim identified as 10-year-old Fadi Alaa al-Masri was shot dead in the al-Zein neighborhood.  Earlier, a body was found in the Black Stone neighborhood. The victim was later identified as Muhammad Shaaban.

An elderly man was also shot dead in the Deir Yasin neighborhood, according to activists. They identified him as 70-year-old Ahmad Abbas.

Visit Yisrael Medad’s Blog, My Right Word.

Islamist Wordplay 101

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

The early months of 1948 did not bode well for the Yishuv. Arab marauders roved the countryside seeking out soft, isolated targets and attacked with ruthless barbarity. The situation was particularly acute in Jerusalem, where supply convoys on the roads leading to the ancient Jewish city were subjected to daily ambush.

 

As part of a wider effort to clear the roads leading to Jerusalem, the pre-state paramilitary forces of the Irgun and Lehi were charged with capturing the village of Deir Yassin, a strategic position that dominated the city’s western approaches.

 

By any measure, Deir Yassin was a hostile Arab village whose residents partook in the Battle of Kastel, exchanged daily fire with the Jewish neighborhood of Givat Shaul, provided refuge to Arab irregulars, and engaged in the almost ritualistic daily ambushes of Jewish vehicular traffic.

 

On April 9, 1948 Jewish forces attacked the village and advanced under withering fire from entrenched and well-armed Arab irregulars. Several hours later the village was secured. Four Israelis and approximately 110 Arabs, combatants as well as civilians, were killed. The very nature of close-quartered urban combat made civilian casualties inevitable. Moreover, Arab combatants had turned nearly every house into a fortification – with some actually disguising themselves as women. Arab propagandists soon swooped in and conjured up fantastic stories of rapes, baby killings, and wildly inflated civilian casualty figures.

 

Contemporary assessments of the battle have mostly debunked these spurious allegations. Yet today in Arab folklore, Deir Yassin is synonymous with “massacre,” and every Arab schoolboy is spoon-fed this lie from the moment he’s able to attain the most rudimentary form of comprehension.

 

The word “massacre,” when used as a verb, describes “the unnecessary and indiscriminate killing of a large number of persons.” However, for Islamists, the word carries an entirely different meaning and addresses every lawful attempt by Israel to defend its citizenry from aggression.

 

Deir Yassin is but one example of Islamist wordplay. More recent illustrations include the Battle of Jenin, Operation Cast Lead and the Israeli naval interception of the Mavi Marmara. During Israel’s Operation Defensive Shield in the spring of 2002, Israeli forces entered the city of Jenin in search of terrorists and their infrastructure. The Israelis could have just leveled the place with airstrikes but negated this option because the risk of collateral damage was deemed too great. Some 20 soldiers and 50 terrorists died in bitter close-quartered urban combat, but this minor detail did not prevent the PA’s Saeb Erekat from declaring that a “massacre” occurred and that 500 civilians were killed.

 

In December 2008, prompted by a surge of Hamas provocations, Israel launched Operation Cast Lead. The former commander of British forces in Afghanistan, Colonel Richard Kemp, noted the following of Israel’s actions during the war: “During Operation Cast Lead, the Israeli Defense Forces did more to safeguard the rights of civilians in a combat zone than any other army in the history of warfare. Israel did so while facing an enemy that deliberately positioned its military capability behind the human shield of the civilian population.”

 

But the Islamists, who provoked the war, saw it differently. Gaza chieftain Ismail Haniyah stated that, “Palestine has never witnessed an uglier massacre.” There’s that word again – massacre – rearing its ugly head over and over, and repeated ad nauseam.

 

Perhaps the most extreme example highlighting the absurdity of Islamist wordplay is evidenced by Turkey’s response to the Mavi Marmara incident. Video footage of the incident clearly demonstrates that the IDF resorted to deadly force only after its troops were violently attacked by Islamist mercenaries. Nine mercenaries with various extremist affiliations were killed. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey referred to the incident as a “massacre,” and compared it to the murder of the 3,000 victims of the 9/11 attacks. The offensiveness and ludicrousness of the comparison is readily apparent, and demonstrates the length to which Islamists have distorted the meaning of “massacre.”

 

But the Islamists have not limited their corruption of language to a single word. On the contrary, they have enlarged and expanded it. For instance, take the word “victory.” It is defined as “a success or triumph over an enemy in battle or war.” However, the Islamists attach an entirely different meaning to the word. To them, if you survive an Israeli assault with your capital intact, it’s considered a victory.

 

A stunning example of this absurdity is amply demonstrated by Israel’s Operation Cast Lead. During the course of the battle, the IDF quickly established military dominance, achieved a combat kill ratio of nearly 80 to 1 and sent the stalwart and proficient warriors of Hamas scurrying like frightened rabbits. Following the battle, Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal, speaking from the safety of his luxurious Damascus headquarters, almost comically said, “the resistance won the battle in Gaza, and the enemy failed in the field as it failed in politics.” That sentiment was echoed by various Gazan leaders who, after emerging from their basement hideout at Shifa Hospital, declared Hamas “victorious.”

 

The Arab-Israeli conflict is peppered with examples of Arab leaders proclaiming phantom victories that are divorced from reality. Arab reality is rooted in a convoluted mixture of lies and fantasy, and Arab linguistics merely reflect this skewed and deeply flawed perception.

 

Words carry with them powerful meanings and, if repeated often enough, begin to take root in our everyday vernacular. The modern city of Ariel, built on barren land untouched in over 1,000 years and which boasts a prestigious university and over 17,000 residents, is referred to as a “settlement” in the “occupied” territories. The word “settlement” conjures up images of colonialist takeover, while the term “occupied” completely negates the argument that these territories are in fact the subject of a bona fide dispute. Yet supposedly neutral media outlets – and even some Israelis – parrot these words simply because they’ve infected our everyday manner of speaking. The next time you hear someone speak of “massacre,” “occupation,” or “settlement,” take the time to correct them and politely inform them of the power and misuse of words.

 

ACTION

E-mail Columbia University President Lee Bollinger at bollinger@Columbia.edu, and voice your outrage over Columbia’s continued sponsorship of Professor Rashid Khalidi, an outspoken terrorist sympathizer who is currently attempting to organize an American flotilla to Gaza.

 

            Yossi Cukier is co-founder of The Activist Network, along with Dina Kupfer and Ari Lieberman. Please note that all petitions, letters, phone numbers, etc., can be found at theactivistnetwork.wordpress.com. The group invites suggestions for pro-Israel and pro-Jewish projects and events.

Islamist Wordplay 101

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

The early months of 1948 did not bode well for the Yishuv. Arab marauders roved the countryside seeking out soft, isolated targets and attacked with ruthless barbarity. The situation was particularly acute in Jerusalem, where supply convoys on the roads leading to the ancient Jewish city were subjected to daily ambush.

 

As part of a wider effort to clear the roads leading to Jerusalem, the pre-state paramilitary forces of the Irgun and Lehi were charged with capturing the village of Deir Yassin, a strategic position that dominated the city’s western approaches.

 

By any measure, Deir Yassin was a hostile Arab village whose residents partook in the Battle of Kastel, exchanged daily fire with the Jewish neighborhood of Givat Shaul, provided refuge to Arab irregulars, and engaged in the almost ritualistic daily ambushes of Jewish vehicular traffic.

 

On April 9, 1948 Jewish forces attacked the village and advanced under withering fire from entrenched and well-armed Arab irregulars. Several hours later the village was secured. Four Israelis and approximately 110 Arabs, combatants as well as civilians, were killed. The very nature of close-quartered urban combat made civilian casualties inevitable. Moreover, Arab combatants had turned nearly every house into a fortification – with some actually disguising themselves as women. Arab propagandists soon swooped in and conjured up fantastic stories of rapes, baby killings, and wildly inflated civilian casualty figures.

 

Contemporary assessments of the battle have mostly debunked these spurious allegations. Yet today in Arab folklore, Deir Yassin is synonymous with “massacre,” and every Arab schoolboy is spoon-fed this lie from the moment he’s able to attain the most rudimentary form of comprehension.

 

The word “massacre,” when used as a verb, describes “the unnecessary and indiscriminate killing of a large number of persons.” However, for Islamists, the word carries an entirely different meaning and addresses every lawful attempt by Israel to defend its citizenry from aggression.

 

Deir Yassin is but one example of Islamist wordplay. More recent illustrations include the Battle of Jenin, Operation Cast Lead and the Israeli naval interception of the Mavi Marmara. During Israel’s Operation Defensive Shield in the spring of 2002, Israeli forces entered the city of Jenin in search of terrorists and their infrastructure. The Israelis could have just leveled the place with airstrikes but negated this option because the risk of collateral damage was deemed too great. Some 20 soldiers and 50 terrorists died in bitter close-quartered urban combat, but this minor detail did not prevent the PA’s Saeb Erekat from declaring that a “massacre” occurred and that 500 civilians were killed.

 

In December 2008, prompted by a surge of Hamas provocations, Israel launched Operation Cast Lead. The former commander of British forces in Afghanistan, Colonel Richard Kemp, noted the following of Israel’s actions during the war: “During Operation Cast Lead, the Israeli Defense Forces did more to safeguard the rights of civilians in a combat zone than any other army in the history of warfare. Israel did so while facing an enemy that deliberately positioned its military capability behind the human shield of the civilian population.”

 

But the Islamists, who provoked the war, saw it differently. Gaza chieftain Ismail Haniyah stated that, “Palestine has never witnessed an uglier massacre.” There’s that word again – massacre – rearing its ugly head over and over, and repeated ad nauseam.

 

Perhaps the most extreme example highlighting the absurdity of Islamist wordplay is evidenced by Turkey’s response to the Mavi Marmara incident. Video footage of the incident clearly demonstrates that the IDF resorted to deadly force only after its troops were violently attacked by Islamist mercenaries. Nine mercenaries with various extremist affiliations were killed. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey referred to the incident as a “massacre,” and compared it to the murder of the 3,000 victims of the 9/11 attacks. The offensiveness and ludicrousness of the comparison is readily apparent, and demonstrates the length to which Islamists have distorted the meaning of “massacre.”

 

But the Islamists have not limited their corruption of language to a single word. On the contrary, they have enlarged and expanded it. For instance, take the word “victory.” It is defined as “a success or triumph over an enemy in battle or war.” However, the Islamists attach an entirely different meaning to the word. To them, if you survive an Israeli assault with your capital intact, it’s considered a victory.

 

A stunning example of this absurdity is amply demonstrated by Israel’s Operation Cast Lead. During the course of the battle, the IDF quickly established military dominance, achieved a combat kill ratio of nearly 80 to 1 and sent the stalwart and proficient warriors of Hamas scurrying like frightened rabbits. Following the battle, Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal, speaking from the safety of his luxurious Damascus headquarters, almost comically said, the resistance won the battle in Gaza, and the enemy failed in the field as it failed in politics.” That sentiment was echoed by various Gazan leaders who, after emerging from their basement hideout at Shifa Hospital, declared Hamas “victorious.”

 

The Arab-Israeli conflict is peppered with examples of Arab leaders proclaiming phantom victories that are divorced from reality. Arab reality is rooted in a convoluted mixture of lies and fantasy, and Arab linguistics merely reflect this skewed and deeply flawed perception.

 

Words carry with them powerful meanings and, if repeated often enough, begin to take root in our everyday vernacular. The modern city of Ariel, built on barren land untouched in over 1,000 years and which boasts a prestigious university and over 17,000 residents, is referred to as a “settlement” in the “occupied” territories. The word “settlement” conjures up images of colonialist takeover, while the term “occupied” completely negates the argument that these territories are in fact the subject of a bona fide dispute. Yet supposedly neutral media outlets – and even some Israelis – parrot these words simply because they’ve infected our everyday manner of speaking. The next time you hear someone speak of “massacre,” “occupation,” or “settlement,” take the time to correct them and politely inform them of the power and misuse of words.


 


ACTION


E-mail Columbia University President Lee Bollinger at bollinger@Columbia.edu, and voice your outrage over Columbia’s continued sponsorship of Professor Rashid Khalidi, an outspoken terrorist sympathizer who is currently attempting to organize an American flotilla to Gaza.


 


            Yossi Cukier is co-founder of The Activist Network, along with Dina Kupfer and Ari Lieberman. Please note that all petitions, letters, phone numbers, etc., can be found at theactivistnetwork.wordpress.com. The group invites suggestions for pro-Israel and pro-Jewish projects and events.

The Not-So-Silent War Of Words

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

   Editor’s Note: This is a new column that will appear the third week of each month.

 

 

   There is an information war being held on the battlefield of Wikipedia. Wikipedia.com is an online encyclopedia that is user-base driven and claims 65,000,000 monthly visits. It is also used as a dependable source for research by mainstream media outlets on a huge range of subjects. Unlike other topics, though, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is so heated that it has instigated its own online Wikipedia conflict – to the point where Wikipedia designated a special division called the IP (Israeli-Palestinian) Section to monitor edited information from contributing users.

 

   The site works in a way that allows anyone with Internet access and a user-name to edit Wikipedia articles. This means that although anyone can contribute, the contribution or editor is screened by fellow editors of that article, not by Wikipedia.

 

   Having said that, there is a certain amount of objectivity that is maintained in most articles, but many users are learning that when it comes to IP, Wikipedia is not objective or neutral, but filled with Palestinian sympathizers determined to undermine Israel’s legitimacy. The Wiki Jihadists are using unethical tactics by Wikipedia standards to ensure the Israeli position is not presented in its articles. In fact, administrators who are supposed to be maintaining objectivity in IP articles are quick to block pro-Israel contributors and their edits for no legitimate reason.

 

   It has gotten out of hand because there are many more pro-Palestinian editors than Israel supporters. Lies are being disseminated virally. Thus, any pro-Israel contributor is easily labeled and dismissed as a biased source, while the Palestinian supporters hide behind their screens and continue to shape anti-Israel public opinion and rewrite history.

 

   For instance, by all accounts, the Battle of Deir Yassin was a hard-fought, grueling battle that pitted ill-armed Jewish paramilitaries against entrenched and well-armed Arab villagers, reinforced by Arab irregulars and according to some, Iraqi military forces. Pro-Arab editors prevented changing the article’s title from “Deir Yassin Massacre” to the “Battle of Deir Yassin.” Some editors who advocated the insertion of neutral or balanced edits were actually blocked indefinitely or “topic banned.” In its current form, the Battle of Deir Yassin reads like a propaganda piece conjured up by Herr Goebbels himself.

 

   For a more recent example, take a look at the Gaza Flotilla article or the Helen Thomas article. You may be frustrated by what you read, but if you don’t remain apathetic you can actually do something about it.

 

   Unlike other media outlets, there is no barrier to entry to Wikipedia, so in minutes you can get involved and make a difference. As the number of pro-Israel Wiki editors increases, the greater the impact we can have in countering the heavy anti-Israel slant. Editing Wikipedia is a worthwhile school project too, allowing students not only to learn about their country, but to source, edit, and become fluent with online activism.

 

   This is all you have to do to become an editor:

 

   Log on to www.wikipedia.com. Click top right to create an account – which requires no personal information. Create a non-provocative user ID so as not to give credit to accusations of bias. Preferably begin by editing non-controversial articles to gain a respected reputation. All edits must be sourced (see Wiki guidelines for acceptable sources). Gradually begin edits on IP articles, taking great care to reference solid sources. To maximize efforts, editing is best done as a group effort. Make it a group project and sign on with a few friends to coordinate activities. This will help maintain pro-Israel edits because each can voice support for another’s edits and reverse “undos.”

 

    Wikipedia is a numbers game, so once there are enough pro-Israel editors working in tandem, the PA sympathizers will – hopefully – be held to a higher standard of proof. Wikipedia is known to minimize pro-Israel editors relative to the pro-Palestinian editors and they have banned pro-Israel editors from the site without cause, so be sure to keep all correspondence civil so as not to give them an excuse.

 

   If you have any questions about editing, reverse editing, and more complex Wiki behaviors, or are looking to band with others, or for short instructional seminars (live talks can be arranged for group projects), please e-mail WikIsrael@gmail.com.

 

ACTIONS

(each month we’ll add a few extra suggestions)

 

   1. Call/e-mail Wayne State University to remove Helen Thomas’s name from its Diversity Award. Phone: (313) 577-2230; e-mail: president@wayne.edu.

 

   2. Sign up to www.UNWatch.org and sign the petition to get rid of Richard Falk, the UN Human Rights Council’s permanent investigator of alleged Israeli violations who is calling for a “legitimacy war” against Israel, with boycotts, divestment and sanctions.

 

   3. Help remove Keith Ellison from the Anti-Semitism Task Force. Petition linked on The Activist Network.

 

 

   Yossi Cukier is co-founder of The Activist Network along with Dina Kupfer and Ari Lieberman. Please note that all petitions, letters, phone numbers, etc., can be found at theactivistnetwork.wordpress.com. The group invites suggestions for pro-Israel and pro-Jewish projects and events.

The Not-So-Silent War Of Words

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

   Editor’s Note: This is a new column that will appear the third week of each month.


 


 


   There is an information war being held on the battlefield of Wikipedia. Wikipedia.com is an online encyclopedia that is user-base driven and claims 65,000,000 monthly visits. It is also used as a dependable source for research by mainstream media outlets on a huge range of subjects. Unlike other topics, though, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is so heated that it has instigated its own online Wikipedia conflict – to the point where Wikipedia designated a special division called the IP (Israeli-Palestinian) Section to monitor edited information from contributing users.

 

   The site works in a way that allows anyone with Internet access and a user-name to edit Wikipedia articles. This means that although anyone can contribute, the contribution or editor is screened by fellow editors of that article, not by Wikipedia.

 

   Having said that, there is a certain amount of objectivity that is maintained in most articles, but many users are learning that when it comes to IP, Wikipedia is not objective or neutral, but filled with Palestinian sympathizers determined to undermine Israel’s legitimacy. The Wiki Jihadists are using unethical tactics by Wikipedia standards to ensure the Israeli position is not presented in its articles. In fact, administrators who are supposed to be maintaining objectivity in IP articles are quick to block pro-Israel contributors and their edits for no legitimate reason.

 

   It has gotten out of hand because there are many more pro-Palestinian editors than Israel supporters. Lies are being disseminated virally. Thus, any pro-Israel contributor is easily labeled and dismissed as a biased source, while the Palestinian supporters hide behind their screens and continue to shape anti-Israel public opinion and rewrite history.

 

   For instance, by all accounts, the Battle of Deir Yassin was a hard-fought, grueling battle that pitted ill-armed Jewish paramilitaries against entrenched and well-armed Arab villagers, reinforced by Arab irregulars and according to some, Iraqi military forces. Pro-Arab editors prevented changing the article’s title from “Deir Yassin Massacre” to the “Battle of Deir Yassin.” Some editors who advocated the insertion of neutral or balanced edits were actually blocked indefinitely or “topic banned.” In its current form, the Battle of Deir Yassin reads like a propaganda piece conjured up by Herr Goebbels himself.

 

   For a more recent example, take a look at the Gaza Flotilla article or the Helen Thomas article. You may be frustrated by what you read, but if you don’t remain apathetic you can actually do something about it.

 

   Unlike other media outlets, there is no barrier to entry to Wikipedia, so in minutes you can get involved and make a difference. As the number of pro-Israel Wiki editors increases, the greater the impact we can have in countering the heavy anti-Israel slant. Editing Wikipedia is a worthwhile school project too, allowing students not only to learn about their country, but to source, edit, and become fluent with online activism.

 

   This is all you have to do to become an editor:

 

   Log on to www.wikipedia.com. Click top right to create an account – which requires no personal information. Create a non-provocative user ID so as not to give credit to accusations of bias. Preferably begin by editing non-controversial articles to gain a respected reputation. All edits must be sourced (see Wiki guidelines for acceptable sources). Gradually begin edits on IP articles, taking great care to reference solid sources. To maximize efforts, editing is best done as a group effort. Make it a group project and sign on with a few friends to coordinate activities. This will help maintain pro-Israel edits because each can voice support for another’s edits and reverse “undos.”

 

    Wikipedia is a numbers game, so once there are enough pro-Israel editors working in tandem, the PA sympathizers will – hopefully – be held to a higher standard of proof. Wikipedia is known to minimize pro-Israel editors relative to the pro-Palestinian editors and they have banned pro-Israel editors from the site without cause, so be sure to keep all correspondence civil so as not to give them an excuse.

 

   If you have any questions about editing, reverse editing, and more complex Wiki behaviors, or are looking to band with others, or for short instructional seminars (live talks can be arranged for group projects), please e-mail WikIsrael@gmail.com.


 


ACTIONS


(each month we’ll add a few extra suggestions)

 

   1. Call/e-mail Wayne State University to remove Helen Thomas’s name from its Diversity Award. Phone: (313) 577-2230; e-mail: president@wayne.edu.

 

   2. Sign up to www.UNWatch.org and sign the petition to get rid of Richard Falk, the UN Human Rights Council’s permanent investigator of alleged Israeli violations who is calling for a “legitimacy war” against Israel, with boycotts, divestment and sanctions.

 

   3. Help remove Keith Ellison from the Anti-Semitism Task Force. Petition linked on The Activist Network.


 


 


   Yossi Cukier is co-founder of The Activist Network along with Dina Kupfer and Ari Lieberman. Please note that all petitions, letters, phone numbers, etc., can be found at theactivistnetwork.wordpress.com. The group invites suggestions for pro-Israel and pro-Jewish projects and events.

Lying About Deir Yassin

Wednesday, April 27th, 2005

April 9 marked the 57th anniversary of events that took place in the Arab village of Deir Yassin in 1948.

In recent years, Deir Yassin has been converted into a bludgeon by far leftists, neo-Nazis, and Israel-bashers in general. It is recited endlessly by the very same people who have nothing to say against a century of countless massacres of Jewish civilians by Arabs.

Deir Yassin was a not-at-all innocent Arab village sitting on the only road into Jerusalem in 1948. The previous December, the UN had voted to partition what was left of Mandatory Palestine into two states, one Jewish and the other Arab, of approximately equal sizes. The Jews of Israel accepted the plan, while the Arab states and the Palestinian Arab leadership rejected it. Had they accepted it, a Palestinian state would have arisen peacefully in 1948.

In response to the UN resolution, Arabs launched attacks against Jews everywhere in the country and in particular placed the city of Jerusalem under siege. The Jewish population of Jerusalem was quite literally starving. The only road into the city passed through Deir Yassin, and the Arab militiamen in the town were stopping all convoys from passing through.

Since Israel had yet to be formally proclaimed as an independent state, the only Jews doing the fighting were members of three sparsely armed militias. The main one was the Haganah, commanded by David Ben Gurion and his socialist Zionists. There were two smaller ones operating independently under the command of the dissident “revisionist Zionist” movement, Etsel and Lehi.

Poorly trained irregulars of the two latter militias were ordered to attack Deir Yassin to relieve the siege. They did so in ferocious hand-to-hand fighting, in which some Deir Yassin villagers were killed. The Bash Israel lobby has always maintained that the villagers were massacred in cold blood. Their evidence is that they do not like Jews.

Those who participated in the battle claim the villagers were killed when the Jewish militiamen fired into homes from which fire was directed at them. The village was successfully taken and the siege of Jerusalem was lifted. Large numbers of Jewish militiamen had been killed in the house-to-house battle. Approximately 100 Arabs in the village died, though the number was later greatly inflated by anti-Jewish propagandists to 250.

Part of the problem was that the mainstream socialist Zionist parties themselves magnified the alleged misbehavior of the two opposition militias in order to discredit them in the coming political contest for control of the emerging Jewish state. This trend has been echoed in recent years, and Deir Yassin has become the massacre of choice for anti-Semites trying to portray the Jews as bloodthirsty barbarians. In part they have based their claims on a document by a Haganah officer, one Meir Peil, who was not present at the battle but surveyed the village after the fighting was finished. Peil said he thought there had been looting and intentional killing of some villagers – but he was an eyewitness of nothing.

Peil is a radical leftist. That’s his prerogative, of course, but he’s not exactly a neutral source. Other, less politicized, sources tell a different tale. Even some Arab sources confirm that no massacre took place in Deir Yassin.

A few years back the Zionist Organization of America issued a study titled “Deir Yassin: History of a Lie,” a 32-page analysis (with 156 footnotes) by ZOA National President Morton A. Klein. (For a free copy, call (212) 481-1500.)

Among other things, the ZOA study shows that the original claim of 254 dead was not based on any actual body count. The number was invented by Mordechai Ra’anan, leader of the Jewish soldiers who fought in Deir Yassin. He later admitted that the figure was a deliberate exaggeration in order to undermine the morale of the Arab forces that had launched a war against the Jews in Mandatory Palestine to prevent the establishment of Israel. Other eyewitnesses to the battle estimated that about 100 Arabs had died.

Despite Ra’anan’s admission, the figure 254 was circulated by Palestinian Arab leader Hussein Khalidi. His claims about Deir Yassin were the basis for an article in The New York Times claiming a massacre had taken place – an article that has since been widely reprinted and cited as “proof” of the massacre.

Meanwhile, there have been numerous exposes of the lies that have been invented surrounding the battle for Deir Yassin, and these have largely discredited Peil’s report.

It so happens that a massacre did take place – but it followed the events in Deir Yassin, which occurred on Friday morning April 9, 1948. On the following Monday morning, an Arab mob, chanting “Deir Yassin,” massacred a bus convoy of Jewish doctors and nurses headed to Hadassah hospital on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem. Seventy-eight of Hadassah’s medical personnel were killed in cold blood.

(Only recently was it revealed that some of the Hadassah nurses had found refuge in the nearby compound of the British consul, only to be turned over to Arabs by the Brits. The Arabs proceeded to slaughter them in revenge for what they thought had occurred at Deir Yassin.

Both sides used the cry of “Remember Deir Yassin” during the 1948 war. There were Jews who intimidated Arabs with the slogan and there were Arab commanders who rallied their populace with the same adage. But the symbolism of Deir Yassin as myth and legacy has been actively nurtured these past 57 years by the UN’s decision to confine more than three million Palestinian Arabs to refugee camps, under the premise and promise of a “right of return” to Arab villages that no longer exist.

In recent years pro-Arab propagandists in the U.S. have stared holding annual memorials for the “victims” of the alleged Deir Yassin massacre. The group is comprised of people who have never denounced Arab mass massacres of Jewish children – massacres committed not by poorly trained irregulars in the heat of a crucial battle, but by Islamofascist terrorists awash in money and under the direct personal command and control of the heads of the PLO.

Steven Plaut is a professor at Haifa University. His book “The Scout” is available at Yahoo.com He can be contacted at steven_plaut@yahoo.com.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/lying-about-deir-yassin/2005/04/27/

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