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April 23, 2014 / 23 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Duke Snider’

The Dodgers Never Left Brooklyn

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

I’m not talking about Duke Snider, Carl Furillo, Joe Campanella, Gil Hodges, Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, Junior Gilliam, Don Newcombe, Don Drysdale, Johnny Padres, Sandy Amaros, the young Sandy Koufax, and the rest of the old-time Brookline Dodgers.

(For your information, I remembered all those names without having to look them up on Google. In fact, when the old Dodger ballpark, Ebbets Field, was being torn down to make room for apartment buildings, my Dad snuck us into the stadium, where we dug up some earth from center field, where Duke Snider once roamed – as if it were blessed soil from the Holy Land – and took it home to put in our planter as a lasting memorial. Woe that I don’t remember Mishnayos as well as I remember starting Dodger line-ups!)

No, I’m not talking about those famed Brooklyn Bums, who stuffed their bats and gloves into duffle bags and deserted New York for the even smoggier shores of LA. I am talking about the other dodgers of Brooklyn, all those who still linger in Boro Park and Flatbush and Williamsburg and Crown Heights and Ocean Parkway and don’t come on aliyah.

I’m speaking about the Aliyah Dodgers, the Diaspora Giants, the Ultra-Orthodox Williamsburg White Sox, the Assimilated Cardinals, and the OU Washington Nationals.

Rabbi Tzvi Yehuda HaKohen Kook would tell his students: “We don’t pick and chose what mitzvot to do. We don’t say, ‘This mitzvah is easy and pleasing to me, I will do it, but this mitzvah is hard and not so pleasing, so I won’t. We aren’t half-believers like the Spies in the Wilderness, about whom the Torah testifies, ‘In this matter, you didn’t believe in the Lord your God’ (Devarim, 1:32). In the matter of making aliyah to Israel they didn’t believe. In contrast, we find the true approach to Torah of, ‘Everything that the Lord said, we will do and listen’ (Shemot, 24:7). We will do it whether it pleases us or not. We believe in all of the Torah with complete emunah” (See, Torat Eretz Yisrael, Ch.1).

Once again, I am not speaking about people who, for whatever valid reason, are unable to come on aliyah. Let’s say, in a rough approximation, that 20% of the Jews in America fall into this category. Whether it’s because they have sick parents to care for, or no way of making a living in Israel, or any other legitimate excuse, let’s agree for the moment that they can’t come – but what about their children? What’s preventing them? Are they any less Jewish than my children? Why should my children have to serve in the Israeli Army (which is a great mitzvah that we are happy to do) and fight to defend the Jewish Homeland, while the Diaspora Dodgers go to ball games and spend the same three years getting stoned in college? And what about the 80% who could come – but don’t?

Let’s remember that the root cause of the destruction that befell our Nation on Tisha B’Av was the unwilling of the Spies in the Wilderness to journey on to the Land of Israel, which occurred on the very same date (Megilla 29A. See The Book of our Heritage, Ch.16, on the month of Av).

My beloved brothers and sisters in the Diaspora- when you are in shul this coming Shabbos, during the Torah reading of Matot, before the typical lavish Diaspora Kiddush and free open bar (which could make even the most ardent Zionist forget about Jerusalem with its line-up of Chivas Regals, Jack Daniels, and Johnny Walker Blacks), try to concentrate on the message of the parsha:

“Now a very great multitude of cattle had the children of Brooklyn, and the children of the Five Towns and Boca, a very great multitude… and they said to Moshe, ‘If we have found favor in your sight, let this land be given unto thy servants for a possession – bring us not over the Jordan.’ And Moshe said, ‘Shall your brethren go to war, and shall you sit here? And wherefore will you turn away the heart of the Children of Israel from going over into the Land which the Lord has given them? Thus did your fathers when I sent them from Kadesh Barnea to see the Land. For when they went up unto the valley of Eshkol and saw the Land, they turned away the heart of the Children of Israel, that they should not go into the Land which the Lord had given them. And the anger of the Lord kindled on that day (Tisha B’Av), and He swore saying, ‘Surely none of these men that came up out of the land of Egypt, from twenty years old and upward, shall see the Land I swore unto Avraham, unto Yitzhak, and unto Yaacov, because they have not wholly followed Me, save Calev ben Yefuneh and Yehoshua ben Nun, because they have wholly followed the Lord’” (Bamidbar, 32:1-12).

Spring’s Almost Here

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

With spring training almost upon us, our attention turns to Arizona (Cactus League) and Florida (Grapefruit League).

 

This year Arizona can boast that 15 of the 30 major league teams will train within its borders. The latest Florida defector: the Cincinnati Reds. The Reds joined the Cleveland Indians in a beautiful large shared facility in Goodyear, one of the many suburbs of Phoenix that house big league teams during the spring training season.

 

The Seattle Mariners and San Diego Padres also share an impressive complex as do the Texas Rangers and Kansas City Royals. The Chicago White Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers also partner. The San Francisco Giants are based in Scottsdale and the Oakland Athletics and Milwaukee Brewers have their own facilities in different neighborhoods within the city of Phoenix.

 

Tucson has the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks (the latter play their regular season games in a domed stadium in downtown Phoenix). It’s easy to see the Phoenix-area teams as you can drive the wide surface streets and go from one to another in a relatively short time. And food is no problem – just check out The Jewish Press Dining Guide and look at the restaurant listings under Phoenix.

 

Of course, baseball’s best teams – the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies – are based in Florida. Curtis Granderson will face the most cameras and tape recorders while wearing his new Yankee pinstripes in Tampa. The Red Sox revamped themselves with new additions led by pitcher John Lackey as did the Phillies with baseball’s best hurler, Roy Halliday.

 

 The three best teams enter spring training better than they were last October and far better than any other team.

 

The St. Louis Cardinals, as you probably know, signed outfielder Matt Holliday to a seven-year $120-million deal. That’s a bit over $17 million a year. Holliday hit .313 with 24 homers and 109 RBI last season.

 

His teammate Albert Pujols bettered him in all departments (.327, 47, 135) and is eligible for free agency after the 2011 season. Pujols will then sign the biggest dollar contract ever seen in baseball.

 

*     *     *

 

They don’t make ‘em like Al Kaline anymore. Kaline, who spent his entire 22-year career with the Tigers (1953-1974) and had to deal with yearly contract offers from Tigers management in the days of take-it-or-leave-it dealings, once turned down a $100,000 contract for a season because he just didn’t feel he was worth that much and told management he’d settle for less. The modest Kaline ended his career with 3,007 hits and was enshrined in the Hall of Fame along with Duke Snider in 1980.

 

Kaline recently turned 75. I followed him intently 55 years ago in 1955. He was only 20 then, and led the American League in batting with a .340 average and showed power with 27 home runs.

 

I, along with my fellow yeshiva eighth graders, saw several of Kaline’s homers that year. We were there on a Sunday after Pesach when the Tigers routed the Kansas City Athletics (later to become the Oakland Athletics) 16-to-nothing. Kaline hit three homers that day, two in one inning.

 

Kaline played in the pre-steroid era and hit 399 career home runs. But to me it was 400. I was there on a Sunday afternoon in 1959 when Kaline homered against the Chicago White Sox in the bottom of the fourth inning. Unfortunately, the rain came soon after Kaline touched home plate. After a long delay, the game was called and since the game didn’t go the official five innings, Kaline’s homer was washed away.

 

Now if I were baseball commissioner, I would allow every at-bat to be in the record books. After all, the pitchers pitched and the batters completed their time at bat and it should be counted in their career records. Here’s an assignment for you SABR (Society of Baseball Research) members out there. See if there are any players who batted or pitched in a major league game but don’t appear in the big baseball encyclopedia that contains the official records of all players because rain didn’t allow the necessary innings to be played.

 

As mentioned before, Kaline is 75 and several other former stars are well into their 80s and some like Bob Feller are into their 90s. The oldest living player was not a star or even a good player, but he was good enough to make the big leagues.

 

One-hundred-year-old Tony Malinosky had 79 at-bats for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1937 and batted .228. The former infielder who resides in California was a friend of former president Richard M. Nixon while the pair attended Whittier College more than 75 years ago.

 

 

Irwin Cohen, the author of seven books, headed a national baseball publication for five years before earning a World Series ring working as a department head in a major league front office. Cohen, whose column appears the second week of each month, is president of the Detroit area’s Agudah shul, and may be reached in his dugout at irdav@sbcglobal.net.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/sports/springs-almost-here/2010/02/10/

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