web analytics
April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Ege Berk Korkut’

Turkish Youth in Holland: Hitler Should Have Killed All the Jews (video)

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

A television interview of young Turkish Muslim immigrants eagerly discussing their hatred of Jews was aired in February on a television station in Holland. Dutch audiences did not initially react, but after the Finnish media site Tundra Tabloids put English subtitles on a video of it this week, people elsewhere have begun to take notice.

The video is one of an interview by a PhD student, Mehmet Sahin, with a group of Muslim Turkish immigrant high school boys.

Sahin’s goal is to determine how “indoctrinated” with hatred towards Jews (and others) Turkish immigrant youth are, and whether the indoctrination can be reversed.  Sahin is a student at VU university in Amsterdam.

The clip opens after the session has already begun. The topic is Anne Frank, and one boy says she was murdered in WWII.  Another one of the boys yells out: “No!  She died from Typhus after the war ended.”

Then a lanky red-haired boy smilingly shares the first of his many statements appreciative of Hitler’s goals, methods and success:

“I am satisfied with what Hitler did with the Jews.”

The interview is just over six minutes long, but a lot of hate is packed into those six minutes.

When pressed to give a reason for their hatred, the boys state as fact that Jews “killed millions of Palestinians in Gaza,” and that Jews “steal other people’s country.”

From a psychological perspective, it is fascinating to watch as one adult in the room tries to explain to the boys that Hitler wanted to kill the Jews because they “looked different,” and that “there were not many Muslims in Europe then, but otherwise…,” obviously shepherding them towards  identifying with the victims, rather than the villain.

No, the boys insist that “Hitler must have had a reason.”

Later on, the boys resist Sahin’s disbelief that they could be happy Hitler killed so many innocent victims.  Their challenge: “you don’t know if they were innocent.”   Sahin again tries to help them identify with the victims, explaining that “Hitler was very clear, that they [the Jews] didn’t match with the Aryan race.  That was their ‘fault.’” Again, the response: “Hitler must have had a reason to hate the Jews.”

Kenneth Sikorski, editor of Tundra Tabloids, wrote that after the interview aired on Dutch television, there was no response until a well known Dutch journalist, Alma Drayer, wrote in a column that she found it scandalous there had been no outrage.

According to Sikorski, Drayer wrote in the Dutch publication Trouw

if Dutch youngsters had said on television that it would have been a good thing had all Muslims been slaughtered, including little babies, there would have been massive reactions about how horrible this was.

Dutch pro-Muslim organizations would probably have organized a demonstration in which prominent leftists would also have marched.

She concluded that Jew hatred in the Netherlands is back where it had been before the Holocaust.

Ege Berk Korkut, a Turkish observer of the change in attitude by Turks towards Israel and the Jews, spoke with The Jewish Press about the escalating levels of anti-Semitism in Turkey today.

Korkut is from Izmir, the “most modern city in Turkey – extremely modern, women can walk on the streets safely at night, and very few of the people voted for Erdogan.” Korkut estimates that in Izmir, less than a majority of the people are anti-Semitic, but “in the rest of Turkey, the percentages are more like 80 percent.”

Korkut told The Jewish Press that he regularly hears people praise Hitler.  “Do not worry, Israel will be destroyed one day, and the day is near that all Jews will pay,” is also something he hears often.  He says that discussions of killing Jews is practically as common in Turkey as are discussions of killing rodents or invasive plants in other parts of the world.

Towards the end of the session with the Turkish Dutch immigrants, one boy matter of factly states: “I hate Jews.  I can’t get that thought out of my head. Period.”  He and the other boys admitted they don’t know any, but don’t see that as an obstacle to saying what they think about Jews.  “It’s freedom of speech,” they explain.

Sahin tells them he is positive he will succeed in getting that and similar thoughts out of their heads. But in response, the boys make a bet of 50 Euros (about $65) that Sahin will fail.  All the boys feel the same way, and make the same challenge to Sahin.  They shake his hand to seal the bet, confident that their hatred is unshakeable.

Hitler Honored in Upscale Instanbul Mall

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

SEE UPDATE AT THE END OF THE ARTICLE

People who have been paying attention know that relations between Israel and Turkey have been eroding, but not many realize that Turkey is now not only openly hostile to the Jewish State, but also to the Jewish people.

On Friday, January 11, a Turkish citizen took a picture which shows exactly how belligerent Turkey has become.  The picture is of a huge poster with the words, “Who Would You Like to Meet if You Could?” and the last name, and only photograph, is of Adolf Hitler.  The other choices include Suleiman I, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, Napolean Bonaparte, the Beatles, Elvis Presley, Vladimir Lenin, Boris Yeltsin, Leonardo Da Vinci, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Michael Jackson.  But only Hitler warranted a picture, a huge one at that.

According to Ege Berk Korkut, an active Turkish writer and blogger, the sign was placed in the Sapphire Mall by the owners, a group of Turkish businessmen who are devoted to Erdogan. Korkut explained to The Jewish Press that the Sapphire is an ultra-upscale mall in Levent, the wealthiest neighborhood in Istanbul. The Sapphire building is one of the tallest buildings in Europe.

Korkut said that while a few people have complained about the banner – and the management has refused to remove it – most shoppers just glance at it and continue shopping.  Ho-hum, nothing startling or even mildly interesting about a huge photograph of Adolf Hitler hanging in the Turkish equivalent of Via Bellagio in Las Vegas or The Shops at Columbus Circle in New York City.

And it is not only Israel and the Jews towards which Turkey has turned its back.

The Iranian Ambassador to Turkey, Bahman Hussein Pour, discussed the close and ever-increasing Iranian-Turkish relations in an article in the January 14 MehrNews.com, an Iranian news agency.

Hussein Pour pointed out that while Western countries, “especially the U.S.,” have been pressuring Turkey to reduce economic relations with Iran, “Iran-Turkey trade volume exceeds $21b this year for the first time.”  The Iranian Ambassador concluded that Turkish-Iranian relations are irreversible.

In addition to the trade relations between the two countries which has more than quadrupled since 2008, Hussein Pour also explained that “more than 15 Turkish provinces have become sister provinces with Iranian ones.”

The timing of the statements is important, as many had predicted that relations between the neighboring nations would deteriorate over the violence in Syria, which also shares a border with Turkey. Turkey’s President Recep Erdogan has repeatedly called on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step down, while Iran is the principle backer of the Assad regime.  Nevertheless, Iran has benefited greatly from Turkey’s import of Iranian oil, and Turkey has prospered from millions of Iranian tourists.  In a move that benefits both countries, hundreds of Turkish movies have been filmed in northern Iran.

This cozy relationship has developed despite the very public love letters President Barack Obama sent to Turkey’s President Recep Erdogan.  Middle East analyst Barry Rubin wrote a telling piece in the spring about the one-sided relationship between Obama and Erdogan. In addition to recounting Obama’s amorous actions towards the leader of Turkey who has turned that giant ship away from the West and into the harbor of the Islamist world, Rubin pointed out that in 2010 Erdogan made a “deal with Iran that sabotaged the delicate U.S. drive to toughen anti-Iran sanctions.”  And despite that blow to U.S. policy and insult to Obama, the U.S. president gave Turkey a waiver on implementing the Iranian sanctions.  Rubin called it “remarkable,” others might call it alarming.

With a huge flattering photograph of Hitler hanging in the fanciest mall in Istanbul, and Erdogan inching towards BFF status with Ahmadinejad, perhaps it is time for this administration to rethink putting daylight between the U.S. and Israel, and instead start putting it between the U.S. and Turkey.

UPDATEEarly Thursday morning, January 16, Korkut contacted The Jewish Press to say that the banner was removed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/hitler-honored-in-upscale-instanbul-mall/2013/01/15/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: