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January 24, 2017 / 26 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘El Al’

Erdan: 90% of Israel’s Waste Water Recycled, 4 Times Higher than Anywhere Else

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Minister of Strategic Affairs & Public Diplomacy Gilad Erdan paid tribute to Israel’s world-renowned sustainable innovation at this week’s first-ever Israeli CSR Experience Conference hosted by Maala, the country’s CSR standards organization.

“Today, nearly 90 percent of our waste water is recycled,” Minister Erdan stated. “That’s around four times higher than any other country in the world. It is a remarkable achievement and this benefits not only Israel. Israeli companies are helping save water around the world, from Africa to California to India.”

The conference saw leaders from Israel’s business community and key international opinion makers in the sustainability and CSR community gather to address Israel’s social and environmental innovation and the strides it continues to make in the field of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). A plethora of speakers and experts from the likes of Teva, Intel, 3M and Strauss Group headed an all-day summit in Tel Aviv Wednesday; also featured were on-site visits around the country to witness Israel’s cutting-edge sustainability in action.

From the world’s most environmentally friendly recycled paper to water shortage solutions, sustainable healthcare, energy conservation and the green construction and infrastructure of the future, Israel continues to lead the way in sustainable innovation, living up to its status as the world’s top innovator in the field of clean technologies according to the Global Cleantech 100 Index.

“Israel is innovative, creative and dynamic and has more high-tech startups per capita than anywhere else in the world,” Erdan continued. “And these startups in large part are not only focused on creating high profits, but also on finding ways to solve the world’s most pressing problems.”

Companies leading the way in sustainability and innovation within their respective fields featured at the event included Hadera Paper, the world’s most recycled & environment-friendly paper; Netafim – pioneers of drip and micro-irrigation; and Mekorot, the country’s top agency for water management. These companies were recognized at the conference for their extraordinary vision and innovation in addressing some of the country’s most pressing issues.

“This is our first ever international conference and we feel CSR work in Israel has reached a mature enough stage to reflect on our environment with the international CSR community,” said Maala CEO Momo Mahadav. “There is, however, lots of work still to be done and we’ve planned this day to allow as much engagement as possible. Israeli CSR has always focused on domestic needs first, which is a big difference from the international CSR community that focuses on global issues, such as climate change.”

Ninety-eight companies now voluntarily participate in the annual Maala CSR Index, an assessment tool Benchmarking Israeli Companies on their corporate social responsibility Performance, including Teva, Unilever Israel, Strauss Group, Siemens Israel, Microsoft Israel, Intel Israel, El Al and Live Person. These 75 large and 23 small to mid-size companies together employ 310,000, with annual sales of $94 billion, representing approximately one-third of Israel’s GDP.

David Israel

El Al Apologizing to Israeli Public in Print Ads, Blaming Pilots

Friday, November 18th, 2016

Israel’s National carrier El Al, which has been plagued by pilot sanctions, spent a hefty penny Friday on print ads apologizing for the massive delays and consequent discomfort suffered by its loyal passengers.

The company is in the midst of a propaganda war against its pilots, and it regularly publishes details of its efforts to convince individual pilots to come to work alongside their excuses and outright failure to answer their phones. The pilots for their part blame the company of outright lying to the public, showing how the pilots in question were never contacted.

The following is translated from Friday’s Hebrew ad:

“To Our Traveling Public,

“Recently you’ve experienced many difficulties on some of the flights. We apologize for it from the bottom of our heart. Disagreements with company pilots have turned into sanctions and a lobbying campaign resulting in damages to you, the passengers, intended to pressure the company, its managers and employees.

“We’ve been investing all our resources in order to resolve the crisis and to carry you once again to every destination punctually, with dedication and safety.”

El Al apology ad

El Al apology ad

The ad concludes with the company’s gratitude for its passengers’ loyalty and a commitment to resolve the crisis speedily.

Meanwhile, the El Al Facebook page in Hebrew last night apologized for the cancellation of light 81 to Bangkok and the return flight 82 to Tel Aviv. According to Globes, flight 027 to Newark was forced to use a chartered plane.

The dispute between the El Al management and the pilots revolves around a new Pilot Law restricting the maximum number of flight hours per pilots, which is scheduled to go into effect 2018. As a result, El Al pilots have been demanding a pay raise to prevent facing a pay cut once the law is in, but management refuses any pay increases.

David Israel

Welcome Home [photo]

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

233 North American new Olim arrived home to Israel this morning, Wedensday, August 17, 2106, on a Nefesh B’Nefesh Aliyah flight.

Approximately 50,000 people have made Aliya with NBN since it was established.

The honor of being number 50,000 was given to Rivka Geltzer, 22.

Geltzer has a degree in economics from Columbia University in New York, and will joining the IDF. She received her new Teudat Zehut (ID card) directly from President Ruby Rivlin.

From the photos you can see that around 75 of the new Olim will be joining the IDF.

What more can we say beyond, “Welcome Home!”

NBN Aliyah August 2016 1

NBN Aliyah August 2016 3

NBN Aliyah August 2016 2

NBN Aliyah August 2016 5

NBN Aliyah August 2016 6

NBN Aliyah August 2016 7

Photos by Ehud Amitun / TPS

Photo of the Day

El Al Ranked Last in On Time Performance

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

FlightStats, a leading provider of real-time global flight data to companies and individuals across the “travel ecosystem” has issued its June 2016 on-time arrival performance report for major airlines, ranking 40 international companies, in which El Al came in 4oth.

With 2,667 flights in June, only 35.88% of El Al’s flights landed on time, while 64.12% arrived late, and the average delay for those tardy birds was 48.3 minutes.

Japan Airlines, which ranked first, had 22,218 flights, 91.05% of which came in when promised, only 8.95% were late, with an average delay time of 32.5 minutes.

Fort comparison, Ethiopian Airlines, with 7,135 flights in June, ranked 29th, with 71.71% of its flights landing on schedule.

Surprisingly, Delta Airlines, with 166,790 flights in JUne, ranked in 8th place, with 82.92% of its flights arriving on time.

An El Al representative told Ynet that its pilots are to blame, since they are executing labor sanctions that mess with the company’s schedule causing those delays. But a review of El Al’s performance over a longer stretch of time reveals that it has been ranked way back there for many months, including a stint in last place in September.

David Israel

UPDATE: Swiss Air Force Escorts El Al Plane Following Bomb Threat

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

The Swiss Air Force scrambled fighter planes to escort an El Al flight from New York to Tel Aviv around their borders following a bomb threat against the flight.

The Swiss F-18 planes escorted the El Al flight along the French-Swiss border, according to Swiss media.

Israel radio said that German fighter planes were scrambled too.

It is unclear what the fighter planes would actually do if there was a bomb on board.

The flight is continuing on to Tel Aviv’s Ben-Gurion Airport without a problem. It’s expected to land between 12:32 PM to 12:40 PM Israel time. Update: The plane has landed safely at around 12:43 PM.

El Al released a statement that an anonymous threat was received, and the plane is continuing to Ben-Gurion airport as planned.

According to the Israeli Foreign Ministry after conferring with El Al, US airport authorities received an anonymous threat of a bomb in the kitchen of the El Al plane. The American authorities informed the Swiss authorities as the plane was then over their airspace. The Swiss then scrambled their fighters.

The El Al crew checked and did not find any bombs on board in the kitchen or elsewhere.

Update: The plane has landed safely at Ben-Gurion Airport at around 12:43 PM.

Jewish Press News Briefs

El AL Flight to Paris Nearly Departs Without Air Marshals

Monday, June 27th, 2016

An El Al flight to Paris from Tel Aviv was forced to return to the terminal after it began making its way to the runway, according to a Channel 2 report.

According to the report, the flight’s security guards never got onto the airplane. When the staff realized the undercover guards weren’t there, the plane returned to the terminal to pick them

The plane took off an hour late, which is nothing too serious compared to the other delays El Al flights have been suffering over the past week.

At least they didn’t forget the pilot.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Analysis: Trump Giving Israel a Bad Name with ‘Profiling’ Comment

Monday, June 20th, 2016

“I think profiling is something that we’re going to have to start thinking about as a country,” GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump told CBS’ Face the Nation on Sunday, using Israel as an example for a place where this method is flourishing and yielding results. “You look at Israel and you look at others, and they do it and they do it successfully. And you know, I hate the concept of profiling, but we have to start using common sense,” he said.

Sadly, as Israel is being drawn with increasing frequency into the US presidential elections, with the Democrats using the Israeli-Arab conflict as a battle field between the Sanders and Clinton proxies, bits of prejudice and misinformation about the life and politics of the Jewish State are coming to the fore and, more often than not, spreading more ignorance than knowledge about it.

Donald Trump’s cartoon depiction of Israel’s security forces’ strategies is a case in point. A few years ago, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio was elected on a promise to do away with police racial profiling, because it perpetuated decades of abuse when African-Americans and Latinos would be routinely stopped and frisked by police. But predictive profiling, which takes into account multiple elements in an individual’s manner and appearance, is a crucial component of law enforcement work, and it’s much more complex than just skin color and religion.

Not according to the BBC, which informed its listeners on Sunday: “Profiling uses ethnicity, race and religion to determine whether a person has or is likely to commit crimes.”

And, sadly, this is probably what Trump meant when he shared with Face the Nation what he had taken from Israel’s security strategies. In a sense, Trump’s and the BBC’s notions of profiling come down to the store detective who spots a black person coming in and sticks to them expecting that they are more likely than others to shoplift.

If Israel’s security forces had used this yardstick in their approach to predictive profiling it would have choked not just its international airports, but traffic on the streets in many cities, too. If all you need to be in order to trigger security response is dark-skinned or Muslim, three-quarters of Israelis would spend their days and nights in police stations.

Chris Weller, who last year reported in Business Insider about his experience as a foreign, non-Jewish traveler at Ben Gurion airport, noted that “no flight leaving Ben Gurion has ever been hijacked, and the airline servicing Israel, El Al, hasn’t seen an attack in more than 30 years.” And yet, dozens of El Al and other flights leave Ben Gurion every day, and passenger traffic is brisk and efficient.

Israel employs, on the streets of its cities as well as in its airports, an intelligence driven system that relies on good communication, alert operatives, and multi-layered screening. Daniel Wagner, co-author of the book “Global Risk Agility and Decision Making,” cites Raphael Ron, a former director of security at Ben Gurion for 5 years, who said the passenger-oriented security system there is focused on the “human factor,” and is “based on the assumption that terrorist attacks are carried out by people who can be found and have been stopped through the use of this simple but effective security methodology.”

Unlike all US airports, departing passengers in Ben Gurion are not asked to take off their shoes during physical screening processes. Instead, passengers are interviewed by trained agents before they get to the check-in counter. So that the area in front of the check-in is not conceded to potential terrorists, as was the case recently in the Brussels airport attack. The interviews last one or two minutes for the most part, so that the line of passengers is moving quickly, and when the agents (they work in pairs) do suspect someone, based on factors such as vocabulary, general behavior, dress, age, race, religion and destination—they may be detained and questioned for as long as it takes.

But the scrutiny at Ben Gurion begins well ahead of the passenger’s arrival at the terminal itself. Every vehicle first passes through a security checkpoint where armed agents examine it, have a brief exchange with the driver, and assess their risk level. Meanwhile, the vehicle is gauged by a weight sensor, and an undercarriage scan. Then, outside and inside the terminal building agents are always mingling with the crowd pouring in, aided by hidden surveillance cameras that are monitored around the clock. Suspicious people would be challenged without waiting for them to reach a counter or a metal detector. An agent would approach them and strike a conversation to assess their mental state and risk level.

All of that well coordinated system relies on a broader intelligence infrastructure that uses informants, social network scrutiny and surveillance — traditional police methods which Israel’s security forces have been using and improving over the past decade and a half both in green line Israel and in Judea, Samaria and Gaza.

Chris Weller offered an excellent example for the way Israel combines computer technology with the human factor, to create a smooth, reliable, fast and effective communication system regarding predictive profiling. “I learned that before any passenger ever gives up his luggage to the fine folks at Ben Gurion International, an employee places a neon yellow sticker on the back of your passport. On it is a 10-digit number. The first number, ranging from one to six, indicates your perceived threat level to whomever else you’re passed along. I got a five.”

And so, with a simple bar-coded sticker, the first agent who meets the passenger communicates his impressions to the next agent down the line without having to exchange one word or even a gesture. Leftwing writer Lia Tarachansky complained a few years ago about the same system:

“So I enter the line … My Israeli-Palestinian roommate tells me he’ll wait while I answer the security lady’s questions. She sees I speak Hebrew, she asks if I packed my own bags and she gives me a ‘1’ as expected. I’m white and I’m an Israeli, therefore I’m probably a Zionist. High from excitement and privilege I ask if my friend can come with me to the check-in. She says of course and asks for his ID. Her face changes.

“Where it says the Jewish birth date the line in his ID is blank. i.e. not Jewish. i.e. Palestinian.

– you know this man?

– yes

– how?

– he’s my roommate

– where?

– Jaffa

– wait here.

“She looks at his last name. It’s Christian, i.e. Arab. She disappears with our passports. The roommate looks at me and we both know what’s going to happen. When she comes back her smile is gone. She tears the ‘1’ off my bags and angrily puts on a ‘3’ as though to say ‘you didn’t tell me you have an Arab friend!’ Her face says ‘don’t you see you’re [expletive] it all up for us?!’”

Tarachansky described in her vivid style just how unhappy she was with the Israeli security system, but the fact is that even in her anti-Israeli narrative one can see that no one was hurt in the encounter she described, no one was manhandled, no one even missed their flight. But the system quickly spotted and responded to the potential threat, and the response was to replace a passport sticker. This hostile depiction of the Israeli method is, in fact, a song of praise to a rational, sophisticated and effective security system.

One wonders whether Donald Trump, or the media, understand the full depth of this system when he describes Israel’s success in police work and security as “profiling.”

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/analysis-trump-giving-israel-a-bad-name-with-profiling-comment/2016/06/20/

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