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Posts Tagged ‘Eliot Spitzer’

Election Eve Poll Gives De Blasio Possible First-Round Victory

Monday, September 9th, 2013

Bill de Blasio has turned around the election polls one day before the real vote and has a chance to win Tuesday’s election without a run-off, according to the new and last pre-elections survey conducted by Quinnipiac University.

De Blasio won 39 percent of the respondents’ support, one percent point short of the minimum 40 percent to avoid a second round. In number two place is Bill Thompson, with 25 percent, followed by former front runner Christine Quinn, with only 18 percent.

A Quinnipiac poll last week gave de Blasio 43 percent, and Thompson appeared to have won more backing at de Blasio’s expense in the election eve survey.

Anthony Weiner hardly ranks a mention, and former governor Eliot Spitzer is far behind Scott Stringer in the race for comptroller. Stringer has a seven-point percent lead.

Weiner in Poll is Toast But He’s Still Drinking His Own Kool-Aid

Monday, September 9th, 2013

In a Wall Street Journal-NBC 4 New York-Marist poll taken on Sunday, September 8, of New Yorkers about who they will select as their next mayor, there is a message for Anthony Weiner: You are toast.

In New York speak, it’s “Geddouddaheyah!”

Tuesday’s primary looks to be a cakewalk for Bill De Blasio who has the support of 36 percent of Democrats who are likely to vote.  According to the poll, de Blasio is leading among women, blacks, whites, Latinos, Jews, Catholics and in each of the city’s five boroughs.

In a tie for second and third places are Christine Quinn – the speaker of the New York City Council – who was in the lead for most of the race, and Bill Thompson, a former city comptroller.  Quinn and Thompson each polled at about 20 percent.

In fourth is disgraced former congressman Anthony Weiner, who had been polling at the top until word was released that Weiner continued sending sexually provocative texts to women not his wife even after he was forced to resign from congress for that same misbehavior. Weiner came out in the poll with support from seven percent of likely New York City voters, and former city comptroller John Liu is in last place with 5 percent.

But in the video at the end of this article, you can get a peek at an interview Weiner did for NBC’s Meet the Press which will air on Monday, September 9, in which Weiner said he still believes he will be the next mayor of New York City.

Speaking of former New York state politicians who had to leave their high-powered positions because of sex scandals, former Gov. Eliot Spitzer is actually in a close race with his opponent.

Spitzer held a sizable lead over Manhattan borough president Scott Stringer for most of the race.  But according to Sunday’s poll, the two are virtually neck and neck, with Spitzer at 47 percent and Stringer with 45 percent, which is within the margin of error.

And here’s that clip from NBCNews.com in which Anthony Weiner tells NBC’s Savannah Guthrie that he will be New York City’s next mayor:

NY Paper Lists Eliot Spitzer’s Sins on Front Page

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The New York Daily News let loose its succinct analysis of former New York State governor and current candidate for New York City Comptroller Eliot Spitzer’s character and its hopes for his future on its front page over the weekend.  There was a news article inside the paper that went into far greater detail, but the front page, as captured in a picture by Breitbart, said it all.

“Liar, criminal, sex cheat, fraudster – and he still wants your trust,” and then, in huge typeface and all capital letters: “scr*w you!”

For those who have not yet been paying attention, Eliot Spitzer was forced to resign his position as governor of New York in 2008 when it was revealed that, despite a history as an aggressive prosecutor of prostitutes and pimps while he was NY’s attorney general, had his own history of frequenting high-end call girls.

After a year or two out of the spotlight, Spitzer went back out in public with a vengeance.  He wrote for a widely-read online magazine, and in 2010 he became the cohost of a talk show on CNN.  Earlier this year Spitzer announced he was a candidate for the position of New York City’s Comptroller.

The position of City Comptroller, not typically considered a high-profile one, is one laden with potential.

The comptroller is really the chief financial officer of the city, and New York’s is responsible for 700 employees.  As comptroller, Spitzer would be responsible for ensuring the financial health of NYC, advising the mayor and city council about all the city’s programs, operations, fiscal policies and financial transactions.

That is a big job, one with plenty of potential for lots of photo ops and high profile “gotchas,” the kind Spitzer loved when he was in his heyday as the “Sheriff of Wall Street.”

But if the Daily News has anything to say about it, Spitzer will not become “NYC’s piggybank sheriff.” In addition to the screaming front page headline, there was an article endorsing Spitzer’s opponent, Scott Stringer, Manhattan’s borough president.

The New York Times also endorsed Stringer, as did the New York Post.

But it is Spitzer who may have the last laugh.  Recent polls show him with nearly a 20 point lead over Stringer.

On the other hand, maybe not.

Spitzer’s wife, Silda, stood by her husband throughout his public disgrace.  However, after Spitzer announced this spring that he was again running for public office, Silda has been a no-show on the campaign trail. There are reports she will seek a divorce from Spitzer as soon as the campaign is over.

Spitzer’s campaign did not respond to a request for comment.

Oh No, Not Him Again: Anthony Weiner Testing the Water?

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

In one of politics most recent ignominious flights from respectability, former New York Congressman Anthony Weiner resigned his office in June, 2011, after it was exposed that he had a habit of “sexting” young women he met online with pictures of his barely clad private parts.

But if  you have consigned Weiner to the bin of history or source of tasteless jokes, you may have underestimated him.

Weiner, 47, who used to represent part of the Rockaways section of New York City which was slammed by Hurricane Sandy a few weeks ago, wrote an op-ed along with Congressman Meeks, who still represents the area.  The op-ed, published in the New York Daily News yesterday, Nov 28, was essentially a call for more funding, better transportation and improved protection from natural disasters – some might also describe it as a stump speech – for a community that was devastated by the storm.

This is not the first time Weiner has reared his head since his awkward exit from office less than 18 months ago.  In fact, Weiner reactivated his infamous twitter account during Hurricane Sandy, when he issued a call for help for the besieged community.

Other than these few forays, Weiner has largely been mentioned in the news only as the other half of a power couple – his wife, Huma Mahmood Abedin, works as Deputy Chief of Staff and Assistant to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Abedin, an American of Pakistani descent, was the target of criticism by a small group of conservative members of Congress who were alarmed by her alleged connection to Islamist extremists, including the Muslim Brotherhood.

Cong. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) and four other Republicans, including Cong. Trent Franks (R-AZ) and Cong. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) sent a letter to the U.S. State Department Deputy Inspector General this past summer.  In the letter, the congressmembers asked that there be an investigation into whether there has been an Islamist infiltration of the U.S. government, based upon research presented in various publications.  Abedin was specifically mentioned in that letter because her mother, her late father and her brother all were allegedly members of, or had connections to, Muslim Brotherhood organizations.

Those allegations ended up doing more harm to Bachmann and her colleagues than to Abedin, as not only Hillary and Bill Clinton defended her, but prominent Republicans such as Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Speaker of the House, Cong. John Boehner (R-OHIO), blasted Bachmann for conducting what they essentially called a witch hunt.

Anthony Weiner is Jewish and was widely considered one of Israel’s most ardent defenders in Congress.  Weiner and Abedin had a son, Jordan, over the summer.  The reception for Jordan’s bris was held in the multi-million dollar Park Avenue apartment the couple moved into after Weiner resigned from office.  The apartment is owned by Jack Rosen, head of the American Jewish Congress and a huge financial supporter of the Clintons.

If Weiner is considering another political run, he already has a potential campaign war chest of $ 3.9 million.

There has been talk that Weiner might be eying the New York City mayoral seat.  If so, a poll conducted this summer by NY1-Marist poll shows New Yorkers are not enthusiastic, with 58% responding that they did not want Weiner to run, and just 25% in favor.

That same poll asked New Yorkers for their take on several other potential NYC mayoral candidates, including another disgraced Jewish New York Democratic politician, Eliot Spitzer.  Spitzer fared only slightly better than Weiner, with 57% opposing his run and 30% in favor.  Spitzer, New York State’s former governor, was forced to resign his office in March, 2008, after his repeated liaisons with prostitutes was exposed.

Vouchers, Gay Marriage And Black-Jewish Relations: An Interview With New York Governor David Paterson

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

David Paterson is the fourth African American and only the second legally blind governor in U.S. history. The son of former New York Secretary of State Basil Paterson, he spent 20 years in New York’s state senate before being chosen as Eliot Spitzer’s running mate for the 2006 New York gubernatorial election. He became governor on March 17, 2008 after Spitzer resigned.

The Jewish Press recently spoke with Paterson about matters of interest to New York’s Jewish community.

The Jewish Press: Many Orthodox Jews, and Catholics for that matter, pay taxes for a public school system they don’t use. Is there any hope of a school voucher program being introduced and pushed through the legislature under your administration?

Paterson: This is an issue I have not fully embraced, but I certainly embrace more than when I first started. I actually went to the Alliance For School Choice conference in August of 2005, and I was sitting in one of the meetings, and I thought, “You know, I think I’m the only person in this room who voted for Kerry!”

But charter schools are probably the closest that we’re going to get to [school vouchers] right now, and I’ve been a pretty big charter school advocate to this point.

But of course as a government official I have to embrace the public school system.

So charter schools, but not necessarily school vouchers.

Not necessarily school vouchers because what happens is if you take enough money out of the public system, you’ve destroyed it.

But many people argue that if the government provided vouchers to all parents, schools would have to compete with one another, and all schools – both public and private – would improve educationally and thrive.

It’s an argument I’m still wrestling with because even with the charter schools around Albany, they opened up so many charter schools that they almost shut down the public school system.

Remember, what you’re doing now is what they eliminated in the desegregation era. Desegregation wasn’t just racial equality; part of desegregation was that the South couldn’t support two school systems. And my question is: Can we do it? Now, I know we can’t do it right now, but when we get past the recession, that’s a conversation we certainly should have.

The Bible clearly opposes homosexual behavior, calling it an “abomination.” Yet you are currently trying to push a bill through New York’s legislature, which would legalize gay marriage. Why?

First of all, I think we can agree that there is a dispute on what the Bible says about a lot of things.

But to some extent we’ve all, regardless of how we feel personally – and I was christened Catholic, by the way – become tolerant of the fact that we have a lot of gay and lesbian citizens who live in our society. So now we get to the legal question – it’s not a biblical question but a legal one: If these people live together, what rights do they have?

The bigger issue, to be perfectly honest, is what [opposition to gay marriage] does to our culture. In other words, suppose you work at an office where someone is gay and this person is getting married. They’re having a reception in the office for the person and you don’t go to the reception because the Bible says that it’s an abomination. What kind of ramifications does this have? When it’s time for this person to be promoted, maybe he doesn’t get promoted because everybody stopped liking him because their religion teaches them that that’s wrong.

Relations between the African American and Jewish communities have improved since 1985 when you first entered politics. How do you account for the tension and animosity of those days?

Eliot Spitzer And America’s Soul

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2008

By now, Eliot Spitzer is no longer on the front pages, but America’s recent fascination with the former New York governor and high-end prostitution did reveal a great deal. Above all, the whole sordid business uncovered how little the citizenry care for themselves as persons. In essence, every society is the sum total of individual souls seeking redemption, and here – in these broken United States – we Americans now inhabit a plainly barren land of incessant voyeurism, ceaseless profanity, shallow pleasures, empty dreams, absent healthcare and rampant criminality. Bored by the stunning banality of daily life, and beaten down daily by the dreary struggle just to stay alive in a nation increasingly divided by extreme wealth and grinding poverty, we now gratefully accept any available opportunity for distraction.

Where can we discover an authentic concern for our fellow human beings? Where shall we turn to discover a heroic national vision or noble societal accomplishment? Clearly, for the most part, we the people are no longer shaped by reverential feelings, high ideals or serious thought. Rather, our preoccupation is now with an orchestrated hysteria of indulgence in other people’s joys and suffering. Moreover, all of this contrived frenzy is sustained by a shameless national immersion in marketing, mimicry and absolutely raw commerce.

What does America actually do amid this breathless rhythm of imitation, circus and consumption? More than anything else, we the people have learned to endure a corrupted society that offers neither private growth nor personal fulfillment. True, there is always a measurable opportunity for “advancement” in the interrelated American worlds of merchandizing, sex and money, but there is also precious little hope of any real happiness.

We (literally) dreadful Americans now inhabit the loneliest of lonely crowds. Small wonder, too, that so many millions cling desperately to their cell phones. Filled with a common horror of being alone with themselves, these virtually connected millions are quick to pronounce: “I belong, therefore I am.” But theirs is a particularly sad credo, an unpersuasive cry that social acceptance is key to survival, and that pretended pleasure is the best that we can ever hope to experience.

To an extent, the immense attraction of cell phones derives from our American society’s machine-like existence. A push-button metaphysics reigns supreme. Here, every hint of passion must follow a uniform and often vicarious pathway. We do argue correctly, that human beings are the creators of machines, not their servants. Still, there is today an implicit and grotesque reciprocity between creator and creation, an elaborate and potentially lethal pantomime between users and used.

Expectedly, our adrenalized American society is now making a machine out of Man and Woman. In an unforgivable inversion of Genesis, it even seems plausible that we are created in the image of the machine. So, what sort of redemption is this?

For the moment, we Americans remain grinning captives in the very lonely and suffocating crowd. In our fractured country, we live in almost every existential sphere at the lowest common denominator. Our universities are largely inhospitable to anything serious. Apart from the pervasive drunkenness and tasteless entertainments, they are mainly a pretext for filling jobs.

For most of our young people, learning is an inconvenient commodity, nothing more. Everyone knows, at the same time, that commodities exist for only one reason. They are there solely to be bought and sold.

Faced with genuine threats of war and terror, millions of Americans still amuse themselves to death with morbid excitements and the endlessly inane repetition of commercial jingles. America now imposes upon its manifestly exhausted people both the open devaluation of intellect, and the breakneck pace of unrelieved work. What a combination! Small wonder that, “No Vacancy” signs hang securely outside our psychiatric hospitals, our childcare centers and our prisons.

Oddly, we Americans now inhabit the one society that could have been different. Some years ago, we had an opportunity to nudge individual citizens to become more than a crowd. Emerson had once even described us as a people motivated by industry and self-reliance, not by anxiety, fear and trembling.

Soon, even if we should manage to avoid nuclear war and mega-terrorism, the swaying of the American ship will become so violent that even the hardiest lamps will be overturned. Then we shall be able to make out the phantoms of great ships of state. Once laden with silver and gold, they are now forgotten. This image will have meaning. Only then will we understand that the catastrophic circumstances that could send the works of Homer, Goethe, Milton and Shakespeare to join the works of altogether forgotten poets are no longer unimaginable. They are in the newspaper.

In spite of our arrogant claim to be a nation of “rugged individuals,” it is a leveling mass that best describes present-day America. An irreverent wasteland of hollow men and women now bristles with deflection – with demeaning hucksterism, humiliating allusions, bitter cruelties and endless equivocations. Is this the country that we are now fighting to preserve and protect in Afghanistan and Iraq? Is this really what we mean by “freedom” and “democracy”?

In an 1897 essay titled “On Being Human,” Woodrow Wilson coyly asked about the authenticity of America. “Is it even open to us to choose to be genuine?” he inquired. This thoughtful president had answered “yes,” but only if we first refused to stoop to corruption, crowd-pleasing and double-talk. Otherwise, Wilson understood, our entire society would soon be left bloodless, a skeleton, and dead also with that rusty death of machinery, more hideous even than the death of any individual person.

Not only sciences, but also souls, are important. There can be a proper American Soul, but not until we first learn to realize that we have insistently scandalized and de-sacralized ourselves. Beside this absolutely primary deformation, the Eliot Spitzer affair was just another made-to-order distraction.

Copyright© The Jewish Press, July 25, 2008. All rights reserved

LOUIS RENÉ BERES was educated at Princeton (Ph.D., 1971) and is the author of many books and articles dealing with international relations and international law. He is Strategic and Military Affairs columnist for The Jewish Press.

13th Avenue, Boro Park

Wednesday, December 19th, 2007

Question: Are you satisfied with Eliot Spitzer’s performance as governor?

 

 


No. Perhaps Spitzer has become more of a media target as governor – before his election he had such a squeaky clean reputation but it seems like everything we read about him in the press lately is bad. He has pros and cons like any other person in office. 

-Nachi Kleinman, student



 

 



Yes. He understands and sympathizes with the middle class and always tries to go after monopolies and conglomerates. I understand that he was criticized for trying to discredit State Senate Majority Leader Joe Bruno by using the State Police, but Nixon did the same thing and for a while he was a popular president. Spitzer and Nixon seem to share the same political paranoia, but I still view Spitzer as “the people’s lawyer.”

-Joseph Stern, student



 

 



No. I can never look at him the same way again after what’s gone on recently. That he would even consider granting illegal immigrants driver’s licenses is absurd. Illegal is the key word here; he would have legitimized illegal behavior. In addition, the whole controversy with Bruno, when his administration used the police for political purposes, shows he isn’t above undermining democracy.

- Izzie Fink, office manager



 

 



No. I remember that whenever my grandmother had consumer issues she would quickly call Spitzer’s office. I was excited when he ran for governor because New York needs a tough politician in office; lately, however, I’ve become disillusioned with him. He is a stubborn man who, it seems, must have things go his way. He is a good lawyer, but he expresses himself in the wrong manner. Right now my opinion of him has changed. 

-Mordechai Karczag, student

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/13th-avenue-boro-park/2007/12/19/

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