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September 19, 2014 / 24 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘emergency’

Reserve Call-Up Orders Delivered

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

IDF “Tzav 8″ emergency call up orders for reservists are currently for Homefront Command soldiers (to help with incoming missile threats) and not for additional combat battalions.

IDF ground troops preparing.

 

Obama Renews “State of Emergency” Against Iran

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

President Obama on Friday renewed America’s 33-year-old state of emergency against Iran.

The status was instituted by President Jimmy Carter in 1979 following Iran’s Islamic revolution, and allows the President greater autonomy in imposing sanctions and dealing with “unusual and extraordinary threat[s] to the national security, foreign policy and economy”.

Obama’s announcement followed a Treasury Department decision to impose additional sanctions against Iranian officials and institutions oppressing and censoring Iranian citizens.

State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said sanctions against Iran were meant to keep Iran from cutting Iranians off from the world with an “electronic curtain”.

Officials being sanctioned include the Minister of Communication and Information Technology, the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance, and the Press Supervisory Board.

No! No! Don’t Rebuild Galut!

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

I know that I promised to lay the sledgehammer aside for awhile, but a few of yesterday’s news items made me batty. In one of them, the UJA-Federation of New York announced it was earmarking ten million dollars in emergency hurricane relief to its local network agencies and synagogues. Chevre! Chaval al hakesev!

Another thing that made me bonkers was the video appeal of Mordechai Ben David showing his damaged recording studio and asking people to donate money to rebuild his battered hometown of Seagate.

When will Diaspora Jews get the message?

Now, don’t accuse me of not having compassion. I sympathize with Sandy’s victims as much as the next guy, believe me. That’s not the point.

The point is that Jewish life in the Galut is supposed to come to an end. If Hashem has smashed things down, why rebuild them? The exile is a curse. A punishment. By definition, it’s not meant to last forever. We’re not supposed to make exile in foreign lands into our permanent home. So if Hashem knocks down a Diaspora community, or a recording studio, why rebuild them? So that the next hurricane, or earthquake, or pogrom can smash them down once again?

Brothers and sisters of New York and New Jersey– rebuild your washed-out communities in Israel! Mordechai Ben David, Avraham Fried, and Shwekey  – we have beautiful recording studios in Israel, as dry as can be! Instead of coming here for concerts on Chol HaMoed Sukkot and Pesach, come here to live, and give your holiday concerts in Brooklyn instead! It’s a lot safer living in Israel!

“It can never happen inAmerica,” they always claim when we warn them.

Pay attention, my friends. Hashem has many messengers. The Almighty can use anti-Semitism and persecution to shatter the fantasy of galut, or He can use fires, earthquakes, and floods to drive his recalcitrant children back home toI srael. The destruction that the shiksa Sand yhas left in her wake is just a warning. Brothers and sisters, we have been saying it all along. Life is much more dangerous in America than it is in Israel. Wake up! Read the writing on the wall before it is too late! Your bastions of Yiddishkeit, and friends in high places, and Jewish Federations won’t help you. Not in Seagate, Englewood, Long Island, or even in Boca. Don’t make the mistake by pretending that this hurricane was just a freak outburst of nature. Everything that happens in the world is from Hashem, and it’s all for the sake of the Jews. So take some good advice and sell your houses now before there is nothing left of them. Come home to Israel while you can.

Get the message?

Arab Terror Attack and Jewish Protest on the Mount of Olives

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

In response to the stabbing of a Jewish man on Friday night, scores of Jewish residents of the historic Mount of Olives in Jerusalem took to the street in protest, demanding to be afforded the peace and security found in other parts of Israel’s capital city.

Walking back from prayers at the Western Wall on Friday night, a man in his 30s and his friend were attacked by two Arab men who leapt from a waiting car. One of the assailants stabbed the Jewish man in his back and both fled. The victim was treated at the scene by a Magen David Adom paramedic and an emergency room physician from Shaarei Zedek hospital, both of whom are residents of Maale HaZeitim, one of the Jewish neighborhoods in the area.

The victim was taken to Hadassah Ein-Kerem  hospital by ambulance in moderate condition, with a stab wound to his kidney. This marks the first time a Jew was stabbed in the neighborhood since its establishment, more than a decade ago. It is an escalation in the violence which includes numerous rock throwing and other attacks. Residents demanded more police presence and stricter measures against anti-Jewish incitement and violence.

At an emergency meeting held by the Jewish community’s security committee, residents expressed their outrage at the Jerusalem Police department’s failure to provide basic protection to citizens, and issued a list of recommendations for local law enforcement, who they say do not take security threats or calls for police assistance seriously.  Among complaints were inability to reach officers in a timely manner via the national police phone service, unwillingness for police to investigate charges of threats or harassment against Jews by Arab neighbors, and an overwhelming lack of police presence in an area known to be hostile toward Jews within the Jerusalem municipality.

Maale HaZeitim, and the new adjacent community of Maalot David, are a 15-minute walk from Jerusalem’s popular and ancient Old City, and enjoys a view of the Temple Mount.

Long Island Orthodox Woman a Volunteer Firefighter

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Shoshana Weiner of Long Island, New York, has been a volunteer firefighter for 12 years. In addition to firefighting, Weiner’s day job includes working as a nurse practitioner at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, and as a paramedic instructor at St. John’s University in Queens.

Tazpit News Agency caught up (literally) with Weiner during her vacation in Israel, where she took the time to volunteer with the Petah Tikvah fire department, answering some brush fires and dealing with hazardous material.

“Volunteering as a firefighter in Israel is a little different from Long Island,” Weiner, 39, told Tazpit News Agency. The fire trucks and the equipment are different from what I am used to in Long Island, but that’s all part of the learning experience.”

Weiner was born and raised in New York, where very few Orthodox Jewish women volunteer as firefighters, she says. “I kind of fell into volunteer firefighting by accident,” Weiner explains. “I was looking to volunteer in emergency medical services (EMS) at a local fire station, but in order to get accepted, I also had to train as a firefighter.”

Shabbat evening dinners take on a different routine at Weiner’s home. “Multiple times, I’ve gotten calls right after my husband has said Kiddush, and I’d have to run out and respond to a fire or medical emergency.”

“The perks are probably the barbecues,” Weiner says with a smile. “At least for my husband.”

The difficult point in Weiner’s volunteer firefighting career was September 11. “That was probably the worst day in history for New York firefighters. I was lucky I didn’t go down to the Twin Towers with the firefighters the first night, when the casualties took place. I joined the second night as an EMS responder.”

In Israel, Weiner also had the chance to take part in the Emergency Volunteer Program (EVP), a non-profit international organization that trains volunteers from abroad to assist Israel as emergency first responders.

“It was great to meet other people across the US, from Washington State to Arkansas, who were training to help Israel in an emergency situation,” Weiner said. “Although we come from different states across America, and there are differences in the way things work in Israel, we all share the language of emergency response.”

Weiner explains that one fundamental difference is the manpower at hand. In “Israel, there are generally two firefighters who do everything during a call—including driving to the emergency and putting out the fire, etc. In New York at least, there are five to six people on every fire truck.”

Shoshana believes that the situation in Israel is volatile. “At some point, we all know that Israel will need our help and that’s why we are here training together– to assist in whatever situation that happens in the future.”

The Safety Net You Need

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

The last time you were at the circus did you gasp as the trapeze artist swung through the air?

Even though his antics might be scary, there’s a strong safety net catch him in the event of a fall. Hopefully, the trapeze artist won’t ever need to use it. But it is always there – just in case.

Even the world’s best acrobats have safety nets to catch them if the unfortunate occurs. So what does that say for the rest of us, who aren’t the world’s best?

Even if you’re not a trapeze artist, you need a safety net. As long as you have dependents, you need a safety net to save you from fiscal free fall.

Sometimes, the “fall” can be the result of poor financial planning and decision-making, but often it’s due to circumstances that are beyond your control.

For this reason, it’s important to make sure you have a safety net in place. In terms of personal finance, this is a two-pronged approach: making sure that you have adequate insurance and having an emergency savings account.

If you have young dependents, insurance is absolutely vital. What would happen if your family’s breadwinner(s) died or was seriously injured? While insurance won’t solve every problem, it definitely helps alleviate some fiscal concerns.

And in a situation that is far less drastic, but still costly, emergency savings can make all the difference between being unable to put food on the table or repairing the car.

Review your insurance portfolio to make sure that your family is covered in the event of a possible disaster, and evaluate your bank accounts to ensure that you have an emergency savings plan in order to catch you in case you fall. And like the trapeze artist, let’s hope that you never actually need to use it.

British Ambassador Responds to Hatzalah Calls

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

British Ambassador Matthew Gould teamed up with United Hatzalah on emergency medical calls in Tel Aviv last Saturday night, getting a firsthand glimpse of the life-saving work the group does in Israel.

Joining founder and president Eli Beer and volunteer Elad Nissanholtz, Gould shed his business suit and donned street clothes and a helmet, riding to emergencies on the back of a Haztazlah “ambucycle” equipped to provide first aid at a moment’s notice.

Gould’s team responded to a severe car accident, a heart attack, and a 97 year old with breathing difficulties, a total of 6 responses in one shift.

Gould said he was impressed with Hatzalah’s quick treatment, its treatment of people of all races, religions, and nationalities, and its ability to coordinate with Magen David Adom emergency medical services.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/british-ambassador-responds-to-hatzalah-calls/2012/10/17/

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