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October 22, 2016 / 20 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘emergency’

Arab Terror Attack and Jewish Protest on the Mount of Olives

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

In response to the stabbing of a Jewish man on Friday night, scores of Jewish residents of the historic Mount of Olives in Jerusalem took to the street in protest, demanding to be afforded the peace and security found in other parts of Israel’s capital city.

Walking back from prayers at the Western Wall on Friday night, a man in his 30s and his friend were attacked by two Arab men who leapt from a waiting car. One of the assailants stabbed the Jewish man in his back and both fled. The victim was treated at the scene by a Magen David Adom paramedic and an emergency room physician from Shaarei Zedek hospital, both of whom are residents of Maale HaZeitim, one of the Jewish neighborhoods in the area.

The victim was taken to Hadassah Ein-Kerem  hospital by ambulance in moderate condition, with a stab wound to his kidney. This marks the first time a Jew was stabbed in the neighborhood since its establishment, more than a decade ago. It is an escalation in the violence which includes numerous rock throwing and other attacks. Residents demanded more police presence and stricter measures against anti-Jewish incitement and violence.

At an emergency meeting held by the Jewish community’s security committee, residents expressed their outrage at the Jerusalem Police department’s failure to provide basic protection to citizens, and issued a list of recommendations for local law enforcement, who they say do not take security threats or calls for police assistance seriously.  Among complaints were inability to reach officers in a timely manner via the national police phone service, unwillingness for police to investigate charges of threats or harassment against Jews by Arab neighbors, and an overwhelming lack of police presence in an area known to be hostile toward Jews within the Jerusalem municipality.

Maale HaZeitim, and the new adjacent community of Maalot David, are a 15-minute walk from Jerusalem’s popular and ancient Old City, and enjoys a view of the Temple Mount.

Yishai Fleisher

Long Island Orthodox Woman a Volunteer Firefighter

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Shoshana Weiner of Long Island, New York, has been a volunteer firefighter for 12 years. In addition to firefighting, Weiner’s day job includes working as a nurse practitioner at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, and as a paramedic instructor at St. John’s University in Queens.

Tazpit News Agency caught up (literally) with Weiner during her vacation in Israel, where she took the time to volunteer with the Petah Tikvah fire department, answering some brush fires and dealing with hazardous material.

“Volunteering as a firefighter in Israel is a little different from Long Island,” Weiner, 39, told Tazpit News Agency. The fire trucks and the equipment are different from what I am used to in Long Island, but that’s all part of the learning experience.”

Weiner was born and raised in New York, where very few Orthodox Jewish women volunteer as firefighters, she says. “I kind of fell into volunteer firefighting by accident,” Weiner explains. “I was looking to volunteer in emergency medical services (EMS) at a local fire station, but in order to get accepted, I also had to train as a firefighter.”

Shabbat evening dinners take on a different routine at Weiner’s home. “Multiple times, I’ve gotten calls right after my husband has said Kiddush, and I’d have to run out and respond to a fire or medical emergency.”

“The perks are probably the barbecues,” Weiner says with a smile. “At least for my husband.”

The difficult point in Weiner’s volunteer firefighting career was September 11. “That was probably the worst day in history for New York firefighters. I was lucky I didn’t go down to the Twin Towers with the firefighters the first night, when the casualties took place. I joined the second night as an EMS responder.”

In Israel, Weiner also had the chance to take part in the Emergency Volunteer Program (EVP), a non-profit international organization that trains volunteers from abroad to assist Israel as emergency first responders.

“It was great to meet other people across the US, from Washington State to Arkansas, who were training to help Israel in an emergency situation,” Weiner said. “Although we come from different states across America, and there are differences in the way things work in Israel, we all share the language of emergency response.”

Weiner explains that one fundamental difference is the manpower at hand. In “Israel, there are generally two firefighters who do everything during a call—including driving to the emergency and putting out the fire, etc. In New York at least, there are five to six people on every fire truck.”

Shoshana believes that the situation in Israel is volatile. “At some point, we all know that Israel will need our help and that’s why we are here training together– to assist in whatever situation that happens in the future.”

Anav Silverman, Tazpit News Agency

The Safety Net You Need

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

The last time you were at the circus did you gasp as the trapeze artist swung through the air?

Even though his antics might be scary, there’s a strong safety net catch him in the event of a fall. Hopefully, the trapeze artist won’t ever need to use it. But it is always there – just in case.

Even the world’s best acrobats have safety nets to catch them if the unfortunate occurs. So what does that say for the rest of us, who aren’t the world’s best?

Even if you’re not a trapeze artist, you need a safety net. As long as you have dependents, you need a safety net to save you from fiscal free fall.

Sometimes, the “fall” can be the result of poor financial planning and decision-making, but often it’s due to circumstances that are beyond your control.

For this reason, it’s important to make sure you have a safety net in place. In terms of personal finance, this is a two-pronged approach: making sure that you have adequate insurance and having an emergency savings account.

If you have young dependents, insurance is absolutely vital. What would happen if your family’s breadwinner(s) died or was seriously injured? While insurance won’t solve every problem, it definitely helps alleviate some fiscal concerns.

And in a situation that is far less drastic, but still costly, emergency savings can make all the difference between being unable to put food on the table or repairing the car.

Review your insurance portfolio to make sure that your family is covered in the event of a possible disaster, and evaluate your bank accounts to ensure that you have an emergency savings plan in order to catch you in case you fall. And like the trapeze artist, let’s hope that you never actually need to use it.

Doug Goldstein, CFP®

British Ambassador Responds to Hatzalah Calls

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

British Ambassador Matthew Gould teamed up with United Hatzalah on emergency medical calls in Tel Aviv last Saturday night, getting a firsthand glimpse of the life-saving work the group does in Israel.

Joining founder and president Eli Beer and volunteer Elad Nissanholtz, Gould shed his business suit and donned street clothes and a helmet, riding to emergencies on the back of a Haztazlah “ambucycle” equipped to provide first aid at a moment’s notice.

Gould’s team responded to a severe car accident, a heart attack, and a 97 year old with breathing difficulties, a total of 6 responses in one shift.

Gould said he was impressed with Hatzalah’s quick treatment, its treatment of people of all races, religions, and nationalities, and its ability to coordinate with Magen David Adom emergency medical services.

Malkah Fleisher

Jewish Agency Provides Emergency Assistance to Netivot Families whose Homes Were Damaged By Rocket Fire

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The Jewish Agency for Israel will provide emergency financial aid to three families whose homes were severely damaged this week after they were hit by a Grad rocket fired from Gaza. The emergency funding is provided through the Jewish Agency’s Fund for the Victims of Terror and will be transferred before Rosh Hashanah in order to allow the families to complete their preparations for the festival.

The Jewish Agency’s Fund for the Victims of Terror, which is supported by donations to the Jewish Federations of North America, as well as foundations and individual donors across the globe, provides additional material assistance to victims of terror and their families. The Fund works in coordination with the Ministry of Defense and the National Insurance Institute and since its foundation has provided financial assistance of 10 million dollars to hundreds of families.

In addition to the Fund for Victims of Terror, the Jewish Agency maintains an emergency fund to provide immediate assistance to victims of terror who have suffered injury or damage to property, in order to help with their initial recovery.

Immediately after the attack, a representative of the Jewish Agency visited the families in Netivot in order to ensure that they received the necessary support. Immediately after the visit, a decision was made to transfer emergency assistance before the Jewish New Year.

Jewish Press Staff

Arabs Attacking Settlement. 6 Jews Injured.

Saturday, September 8th, 2012

Some residents of Eish Kadosh near Shiloh, were hiking on Shabbat in the vineyards belonging to the Gush Shilo at around 6 PM.

The hikers were attacked by hundreds of Arabs armed with clubs and stones from the village Kotzra. Three of the hikers were hurt with injuries all over their bodies from the stones and clubs.

The community’s emergency response team (Kitat Konninut) and the IDF were called up, while simultaneously, the Kotrza village mosque loudspeakers began calling in Arabic to the villagers to go up to the Aish Kadosh community.

When the emergency response team arrived they also came under attack by the Arab lynch mob, but without non-lethal weapons to handle the attacking mob, they found themselves under attack and unable to respond. The emergency response team suffered three injured members. All six wounded were treated by medics from the emergency response team.

After the IDF arrived at the attack, the emergency response team then returned to the settlement to protect it from rioters gaining entrance.

The IDF forces that arrived were then flanked by Arab rioters who attacked them from three directions. The IDF began responding with crowd dispersal tools

Clashes are still going on (8:40PM) and IDF is trying to push back the rioters from the settlement.

Aaron Katzuf, the Aish Kadosh community spokesman, said the, “community’s children are crying. They’s unable to sleep due to the shouts of ‘Itbach El Yahud‘ (Slaughter the Jews) and ‘Allah Akbar‘, as well as from the sounds of explosions and flares.”

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Mt. Carmel Tunnels to Be Used as Bomb Shelters Should Iran Attack

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

The idea of using the Mt. Carmel tunnels as public shelters already came up 2 years ago when they were initially opened for traffic, but now the idea is being considered as a practical solution should a war break out.

Haifa Mayor Yona Yahav has already approached Home Front Command and National Emergency Council officials asking to coordinate the use of the tunnels as public shelters. This is accompanied by a request from officials involved to organize adequate parking space for the thousands of cars belonging to the people who will arrive at the tunnels seeking protection.

Yahav also asked the Ministry of Industry and Trade and the Ministry of Transportation to declare the tunnels an essential emergency workplace, in order to prevent worker now-shows which could cause the closure of the tunnels.

The Carmel Tunnels (Minharot HaCarmel) are a set of road tunnels in and around Haifa, Israel. The tunnels’ purpose is to reduce road congestion in the Haifa area and to provide an alternative route of reaching the eastern and central parts of the city, Haifa Bay and the Krayot area to and from Israel’s central coastal plain without having to travel through traffic-congested downtown Haifa, having to drive up and across the Carmel Mountain or bypassing Haifa from the east, along the edge of the Jezreel Valley.

The tunnels cut the travel time from the Haifa South interchange in the west to the Checkpost interchange in the east from 30–50 minutes down to 6 minutes.

The tunnels were opened to traffic on December 1, 2010.

As part of the preparations for the worst case scenario, a map of the businesses in the city was recently completed by the Haifa Municipality, with the intention of ordering businesses to remain open in an emergency situation. Should the owner refuse, options are being examined for opening the businesses against their will and thereby forcing them to sell essential items. Cellular communication providers and gas stations are being targeted specifically by the municipality, to prevent their closure during an emergency situation.

Mayor Yahav told IDF Radio that since the day those tunnels have opened he had been contemplating using them as mass bomb shelters.

“I’ve been investigating for a long time the possibility of sheltering tens of thousands underground. But no one so far has been able to tell me how much oxygen would be required for, say, 30 or 40 thousand people.”

During World War 2, the bombing of London and especially the Blitz led to the use of many tube (underground train) stations as air-raid shelters. Closed stations and unfinished sections of new lines were also used. The shelters were well suited to their purpose, but some stations could still be breached by a direct hit, and, indeed, a few German attacks did result in serious loss of life, most notably at Balham and Bounds Green in October 1940 and Bank in January 1941. A still worse disaster was a crowd crush accident at the unfinished Bethnal Green in March 1943.

Jacob Edelist

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/mt-carmel-tunnels-to-be-used-as-bomb-shelters-should-iran-attack/2012/08/22/

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