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December 19, 2014 / 27 Kislev, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘European Jewish Congress’

‘EU Must Condition Aid to PA on End of Incitement’

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

The European Jewish Congress has called on European leaders to condition future aid and cooperation between the European Union and the Palestinians on the end of rampant incitement against Israel and Jews in the Palestinian Authority in the wake of the terror attack against worshipers in a synagogue in Jerusalem this morning.

“The European Union, as was seen in the Foreign Ministers statement yesterday, has placed too much focus on Israeli actions and have completely ignored far more important issues like incessant Palestinian incitement which directly leads to massacres like the one we saw at the synagogue this morning and over the last couple of weeks,” Dr. Moshe Kantor, EJC president said.

“The Europeans have an ability to influence and a tool with which to pressure the Palestinians to end the daily incitement emanating from its leaders, education system, media and religious institutions, and that is the financial assistance which is helping aid this system,” he added.

“There should be a massive rethink in Europe about the best way to achieve true peace, because while there has been an obsessive focus on settlement building, incitement to hatred and violence, Anti-Semitism and religious hatred, is by far the greatest obstacle to any lasting peace. The Europeans should demand that this ends immediately and threaten to withdraw all aid and cooperation until it does, before we see more massacres like the one this morning in Jerusalem….

“By ignoring Palestinian incitement to hatred and violence. the international community has allowed for the creation of a culture of immunity and impunity in the Palestinian Authority and its official institutions.”

“Ignoring all Palestinian offenses and focusing only on Israel’s perceived infractions is a soft bigotry of low expectations and should end immediately.”

Sweden to Officially Recognize the State of ‘Palestine’

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

Sweden’s incoming prime minister Stefan Löfven announced to his cabinet on Friday, Oct. 3, that the Scandinavian country is about to become the first nation to officially recognize the state of ‘Palestine.’

In his inaugural speech to the Swedish parliament, Löfven insisted that the only way to end the conflict is for there to be a two-state solution. Bizarrely, he insisted that the solution had to be “negotiated in accordance with international law,” and “requires mutual recognition and a will to peaceful co-existence.” And with that, he announced, “Sweden will therefore recognize the state of Palestine.”

Huh?

Not sure what magic wand he was waving (or magic mushrooms he was chewing) when Löfven concluded that Sweden’s recognition of a ‘Palestinian State’ was the equivalent of international law or would result in the necessary “mutual recognition and will to peaceful co-existence.”

The United Nations General Assembly voted to approve the recognition of ‘Palestine’ as a sovereign state in 2012, but the European Union and most EU countries have not yet given their official recognition.

Nael Touqan, Chairman of Palestinian Association of Stockholm told  Sweden’s  English-language paper The Local:

“We like this news so much. This is what we have been fighting for. Our religious festival Eid starts tomorrow and we consider this as a present for all Palestinians.”

“Sweden has great respect in Europe so we hope this means that other nations will follow its lead,” he added. “This is the only way to pressure Israel.”

Phil Carmel from the European Jewish Congress which represents Jews in 40 countries including Sweden told The Local:”This is a token move by Sweden’s new government and it is ironic that Sweden recognizes a Palestinian state at a time when even Palestinians can’t agree on what its borders will be.”

He added: “A key principle of the European Union is to recognize future states based on negotiations and it is very sad that Sweden appears to have cast these negotiations aside and wants to label Palestine as a state before any formal agreement on its borders.”

Tundra Tabloids, a pro-Israel media site based in Finland, described Sweden’s decision as one made by “the Marxist-led Swedish government.”  It vowed to refer to the Swedish government from here on as “the radical Marxist regime.”

This past July in Malmo, a city in Sweden, a man was badly beaten by a Swedish mob for flying an Israeli flag outside his window. The man was assaulted with metal bars after a stone was smashed through the window of his home.

In August of this past summer, a Jewish woman in the Swedish town of Upsalla was badly beaten for wearing a Star of David necklace.

Polish Prosecutors Clear Auschwitz Soccer Chanters

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Several Jewish organizations have criticized a Polish prosecutor’s decision not to try soccer fans who chanted about Jews and Auschwitz.

A spokesperson for the prosecutor’s office of Poznan in central Poland said last week that no charges would be brought against the fans because they did not mean to offend Jews when they chanted the slogans, according to the Glos Wielkopolski daily.

The spokesperson, Magdalena Mazur-Prus, was referring to chants at a match in September between the Lech Poznań team and Widzew, a club from the city of Lodz whose population was one-third Jewish before the Holocaust.

The Poznan fans shouted to the Lodz fans: “You belong in Auschwitz,” “ride on, Jews,” and “into the ovens,” according to the daily. It also reported the Poznan fans shouted: “Go to the gas, RTS,” an acronym which refers to the team from Lodz.

But the Poznan prosecutor’s office decided to drop charges because the chants were directed at fans, not Jews, and therefore were not intended as incitement to racial hatred, according to Mazur-Prus. “Of course, such cries are reprehensible and unacceptable, but not every wrongful conduct is a crime,” she said.

In a statement Tuesday, the president of the European Jewish Congress, Moshe Kantor said that he was appalled by the decision.

“Unfortunately, extreme anti-Semitic chants like those in Poznan are regularly heard in many European stadiums, including in England and Holland, and the reaction of the authorities is minimal,” Kantor said, adding that this case and others “demonstrate that anti-Semitism has become the last acceptable prejudice in football.”

Abraham Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, urged the Polish government to intervene and overturn the municipal prosecutor’s decision.

Survey: 29% of European Jews Considered Emigrating due to Antisemitism

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Nearly a third of respondents to a survey on anti-Semitism in Europe said they “seriously considered emigrating” because of perceived anti-Semitism.

In the survey among 5,847 Jews from nine European Union member states, 29 percent of all respondents said that they considered emigrating in recent years because they did “not feel safe” living in their countries as Jews, according to Morten Kjaerum, the director of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights which conducted the research among Jews from Sweden, France, Belgium, Britain, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Romania and Latvia.

The figure for Jews contemplating emigration was particularly high in Hungary, France and Belgium with 48, 46 and 40 percent respectively, according to the report which Kjaerum presented Friday at a press conference in Vilnius.

Asked about their definition of an anti-Semite, 34 percent of all respondents indicated that it applied to “a non-Jewish person if he or she criticizes Israel.” In Sweden, only 21 percent of 703 respondents said non-Jewish critics of Israel were anti-Semitic compared to 42 percent of 1,137 French respondents. Nearly 90 percent of respondents said that people who did not consider Jewish citizens of their country as compatriots were anti-Semitic.

On average, 76 percent said anti-Semitism has increased over the past five years. One in five respondents said they had personally experienced at least one incident of anti-Semitic verbal or physical assault in the year before the survey.

Twenty percent of respondents said they avoided wearing, carrying or displaying things that might help people identify them as Jews in public. That figure was 34 percent in Sweden; 29 percent in France; 20 percent in Hungary and eight percent in Britain.

European Jewish Congress President Moshe Kantor said the survey was “of great importance,” adding that the fact that “Jews are not able to express their Jewishness because of fear should be a watershed moment for Europe. He called on E.U. governments to study the survey’s results.

Overall, four percent of respondents said they had experienced physical attack or threats of violence in the year before the survey because they were Jewish.

Sixty-four percent of respondents who said they had experienced physical attacks also said that they did not report these incidents because they considered doing so ineffective.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/survey-29-of-european-jews-considered-emigrating-due-to-antisemitism/2013/11/08/

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