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October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Facebook page’

Palestinian Authority Hacker Posts on Zuckerberg’s Facebook Wall

Monday, August 19th, 2013

A Palestinian Authority hacker from Hevron posted a message on Facebook founder Marc Zuckerberg’s wall to show there is a bug in the social network’s security settings.

Khalil Shreateh posted information about the bug on Zuckerberg’s wall late last week following unsuccessful attempts to report the bug to Facebook security. The bug allowed Shreateh to post on the walls of other members despite security settings.

“Sorry for breaking your privacy … I had no other choice … after all the reports I sent to Facebook team,” Shreateh wrote on Zuckerberg’s wall.

Facebook security had denied that the flaw was a bug.

Shreateh, who is unemployed, had hoped to win a $500 reward paid out to hackers who discover bugs on Facebook. Instead, his Facebook account was frozen, since he violated Facebook’s terms of service by posting illegally on Zuckerberg’s page. His account has since been reinstated.

Double Standards on Facebook

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Some things, you have to see to believe.  I was alerted by a friend, a couple of days ago, to the existence of a truly revolting, anti-Semitic Facebook page called “The Untold History,” which, according to Facebook, does not violate Facebook’s standards.

We practice link hygiene here at TOC, so I offer this write-up from the Online Hate Prevention Project (OHPP) website, which contains a link to the offensive Facebook page.  If you can stomach another round of anti-Semitic imagery, cast a glance at the image copied in this post from the Facebook page – one of quite a few.  The page has 833 “Likes” as of this writing.

We don’t know how many users have reported this page for “hate speech,” against which Facebook has a policy.  But several of those who have reported the page have posted in the comments at OHPP’s Facebook page that the response they received was like this one (posted by OHPP):

fb-response

The text reads:

Thank you for taking the time to report something that you feel may violate our Community Standards.  Reports like yours are an important part of making Facebook a safe and welcoming environment.  We reviewed the page you reported for containing hate speech or symbols and found it doesn’t violate our community standard on hate speech.

(This is the response I received as well.)

I tend toward the libertarian when it comes to freedom of expression; as long as Facebook is a private company, I believe it has the right to host or not host what seems proper to its leadership and shareholders.  Facebook can afford its users the latitude of expression it prefers, even when the expression in question is really offensive; the customer base can then decide to participate or not accordingly.

But since Facebook has a policy on hate speech, what is the company’s standard for latitude in freedom of expression?  What doesn’t get to remain on Facebook?  Where does the arbiter make the cut-off, and can users trust that it’s being done fairly?  This week, we have been given a unique opportunity to do a comparison with what did get banned at Facebook – if only for a few days.

On 9 August, author and columnist Ruthie Blum posted a column in which she recounted her recent adventures in being banned by Facebook:

For the past two months, I have intermittently been barred from Facebook.

The first time it happened was in June, when I tried to post my Israel Hayom column. Suddenly, a window popped up, telling me that inappropriate material had been found on, and removed from, my page. I was warned that if I continued violating Facebook’s “community standards,” I would be banned from the social network for good.

The notice included a link specifying these standards, and a demand that I click to acknowledge I had read and understood them. Failure to do so, it said, would result in my inability even to open Facebook to read my newsfeed. I complied.

Ms. Blum worked through the wickets Facebook set up for restoring her account to its good graces, but was unable to determine what, exactly, had violated its standards.  She was barred from Facebook for 24 hours at one point, and then for three days.

Her columns, she observes, are political in nature.  (Ms. Blum was formerly an editor at The Jerusalem Post.)  I append links to samples of them from the relevant timeframe here, here, here, here, and here.  She writes responsibly, in measured tones, and with reason and documentation; there is nothing intemperate or inflammatory about her content.  You might disagree with its political perspective, but you could not reasonably consider it “hate speech,” violence, threats, or bullying.  One thing it is completely free of:  graphics depicting anyone, or depicting anyone’s ethnic or religious symbols, surrounded by dead bodies and blood.

Here’s a screen cap from one of her recent columns at Israel Hayom:

blum-1

Contrast the tone and presentation of the type of content she was trying to link to with a random sampling of the content at The Untold History’s Facebook page:

Bennett and Livni in Facebook Fight over Women of the Wall

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Justice Minister Tzipi Livni and Religious Affairs Minister Yair Lapid, who doubles as Finance Minister, are arguing via Facebook over the issue of a women’s minyan at the Western Wall.

Jewish Agency chairman Natan Sharansky has proposed that a Women of the Wall demand for the minyan be allowed at the southern part of the Kotel, called Robinson’s Arch.

Lapid said he is working to approve new regulations but charged Livni with grandstanding. She wrote a letter to Bennett’s office on Shavuot.

Her beef does not concern her views, which are similar to Sharansky, but that no change in the law can be made without her approval.

“I’ll admit that I pray in an Orthodox synagogue…, but I believe that the time is ripe…to apply a pluralistic and tolerant approach at the Western Wall, allowing women to pray according to their customs, mostly because they do so in an area that is intended for women only,” she wrote.

Lapid took to Facebook after the holiday and wrote, “Tzipi Livni, come on.” He chastised Livni for a “provocative spin” and “media trick” by informing Israeli media that she had sent him a letter to his office on the Shavuot holiday, when he could not respond since he was not in his office.

Bennett wrote he has meet with women wanting to pray at the Western Wall with prayer shawls and tefillin that are worn by orthodox men but not women. The meeting was “the first time a religious services minister held talks with the Women of the Wall. And then came Tzipi Livni,” according to Lapid.

Livni wrote back on her Facebook page, “Naftali Bennett, come on. Minister Bennett is upset. He claims that I didn’t consult him before writing him a letter clarifying my stance on women’s prayer at the wall.”

“Since the Women of the Wall controversy broke out, Minister Bennett hasn’t called me a single time to update me on the compromise attempts that he claims he’s trying to reach on the matter, even though the law requires us both to sign the regulations, so he has no one but himself to blame.”

New Finance Minister Lapid: Economy in Monstrous Straits

Sunday, March 24th, 2013

A week into his new job, Finance Minister Yair Lapid says that the picture that unfolds before him regarding the state of Israel’s economy is much worse than he expected, and that he intends to reduce spending and make painful cutbacks.

According to Lapid, Israelis who will be feeling this year that their situation has worsened should know that it’s only temporary.

On his Facebook page, Minister Lapid wrote that Israel’s deficit is monstrous, ominous and growing worse. “The reason the deficit – wasting of money we didn’t have and making commitments that we shouldn’t have made.”

The Finance Minister stressed that his first year in office will be devoted to reducing the deficit, so that next year it will be possible to reduce housing prices, pursue burden equality, help small businesses, and improve education.

Lapid, who initially pressed for the Foreign portfolio, was aware that becoming minister of finance could become a career ender for him. Practicing fiscal responsibility in government is not the type of task that makes for great popularity – have a look at Greece and Cyprus these days, or review Israel’s 2011′s summer of social protests. Undoubtedly, it would have been easier for the flashy television journalist to strut his right stuff as foreign minister.

Indeed, some have suggested that Prime Minister Netanyahu has lured his younger challenger into the finance ministry trap precisely so that the youthful Lapid age fast and lose his shin trying to deal with the $15 billion plus deficit left him by his predecessor.

But from his first statement on the state of the economy, it appears that Lapid continues to understand communications better than the prime minister, and, in fact, could turn his stint at his troubled office into an even more meteoric rise to the premier’s seat.

By describing Israel’s economy in the worst possible details, Lapid is laying the ground for his own eventual role as the savior of the same economy. Israel’s economy remains robust, but could stand to improve in terms of a more equal distribution of jobs, goods and services.

On April 25, 2012, Fitch Ratings affirmed Israel’s credit rating at ‘A,’ with an outlook of ‘stable.’ The agency predicted 3.00 percent growth for 2012 and 3.50 percent growth for 2013. The “monstrous deficit” Lapid describes can be attributed to the fact that, with a poorer Europe’s appetite for Israeli goods diminishing, Israel’s tax revenues have not hit the anticipated mark. It shouldn’t have been allowed to slide and accumulate as it has done, but it remains more robust than most.

Politically, Prime Minister Netanyahu may rue the day he invited his arch nemesis to get his hands on the state books – because Lapid could actually improve them, or at least look really good trying.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/new-finance-minister-lapid-economy-in-monstrous-straits/2013/03/24/

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