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November 28, 2015 / 16 Kislev, 5776
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Fifth Avenue’

LIVE: New York Celebrates the Israel Day Parade [video]

Sunday, May 31st, 2015

New York is celebrating for one of its largest, most popular – and possibly more controversial – parades of the year: the Israel Day Parade. More than 30,000 marchers are parading down the city’s most famous street — Fifth Avenue — from 11 am to 4 pm ET.

Hundreds of thousands of spectators began gathering early Sunday as organizations prepared their floats and schools brought their students on the buses to designated step-off sites. Random groups of protesters hoping to express their thoughts tried to break into the area of the march to reach spectators and marchers but failed miserably — New York’s finest had already blocked off the area long, long before.  Security is tight and the area is well-protected with both uniformed and undercover personnel.

Millions of others around the world who are unable to attend can participate virtually via the Internet as well: the Nachum Segal Network begins its live feed of the event at 11 am ET, and CelebrateIsraelNY.org — the official website for the parade and all Israel Day Parade events in New York today — kicks off its official live feed at 12 noon.

This year, popular Israeli vocalist “Rita” will be performing, as will: Miri Ben-Ari, a Grammy Award-winning violinist, Golem, SoulFarm, The Shul Band, The Ramaz Band, The Israel Dance Institute, The Areyvut Mitzvah Clows and many others. The NYPD Shomrim Society – the organization of Jewish New York City Police Officers – will also be marching, along with the city’s Fire Department and many local and state officials as usual. Hundreds of Jewish schools and community organizations will be joining them on foot and on floats as well.

Also marching in the parade this year are several controversial groups, including the Americans for Peace Now and the New Israel Fund, both of which carry out activities against Israeli development and in support of the Palestinian Authority. There has been a great deal of debate over their participation in the parade, which was established to express pride in the rebirth and continued life in the State of Israel.

Other Israel Festival activities are continuing in various locations around the city, including Central Park and at Pier 94, until 7 pm.


Members of the Bukharian Jewish Community Supporting Israel

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Possibly the most colorful group of Israel-loving Jews parading on Fifth Avenue Sunday.

Max Ferguson’s Portraits Of His Father

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Max Ferguson: Painting My Father April 15–June 29, 2012 Hebrew Union College Museum One West 4th Street (between Broadway and Mercer) http://maxferguson.com/

Max Ferguson’s 1993 painting Katz’s may be the second most iconic representation of the kosher-style delicatessen after the 1989 Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan film, When Harry Met Sally. Ferguson’s photorealistic painting depicts the deli from an interesting perspective, which is simultaneously inviting and hostile—in short, the dichotomy of deli culture. Viewers are literally obstructed in their attempt to “enter” the image, as Ferguson has cropped out the foreground and filled it with the deli counter. Yet every detail—from the hanging meats and the scales to the portrait of the man behind the counter and the ceiling tiles—is so carefully and lovingly rendered that one can’t help but want to linger despite the blocked entrance and lack of firm ground to stand upon.

Less well-known, but arguably even more visually arresting is Ferguson’s 2005 painting, My Father in Katz’s,which is part of his upcoming solo show at Hebrew Union College that opens next month. In the painting, Ferguson’s father, Richard (1912-2005), who wears a flat cap, sits alone at a table eating a sandwich. A Dr. Brown’s cream soda (with straw), ketchup and mustard containers, and a salt shaker look up at him from the table, and Ferguson, who cleverly scrawls his signature into the wall in the bottom left corner, captures an impressive array of textures. Ferguson finds common elements in the textures, though, and one of the wall patterns (which isn’t unlike a snake’s scaly skin) is echoed in the jacket Ferguson’s dad wears. It’s a cliché, to be sure, but the work is so realistic that one can practically smell the food.

Max Ferguson. “My Father in Katz’s.” 2005. Oil on panel. 16 x 20 inches. Private Collection/The Bridgeman Art Library.

Even from a cursory glance at Ferguson’s personal website, it’s easy to see that he takes Jewish images seriously, since one of his headings under “portfolio” is devoted to Jewish works. They include Ratner (1996), a deli which is no longer in operation; Schapiro (1996), the no longer operating wine store on Rivington Street; Bagel Bakery (1998); Schindler (1995),which shows the marquee of the since closed Art Greenwich theater; Yonah Schimmel (1992), a knish bakery that is still in operation; Torah Scribe (1993), which depicts a bearded scribe writing a Torah scroll; and Matzo Bakery (1992). Works in other sections of the site—such as the drawing Butcher Shop (2003) and the oil painting Jerusalem Fish Vendor (2004)—could also appear in the section on Jewish art.

“Despite spending so much time in Jerusalem, I continue to paint primarily New York-themed imagery,” the artist notes in the Hebrew Union College press release. “I don’t want anyone ever saying about me, ‘Oh, I didn’t know he was Jewish.’ With my Ellis Island name, people often assume I am not.” Ferguson adds that the exhibit, of 30 paintings he made of his father over three decades, coincides with what would have been his father’s 100th birthday.

Not all of the images of Ferguson’s father scream their faith as loudly as the other Jewish subjects. Saturday Night/Sunday Times, strictly speaking, has nothing Jewish about it, but the full-length portrait of Ferguson’s father receiving change from a street newspaper vendor after purchasing a New York Times certainly represents a New York ritual that will speak to many Jewish viewers. Ferguson often seems to treat props as seriously as he does figures, and this piece is no exception. The stacked copies of New York Daily News, Newsday, and New York Post are rendered with as much careful attention to detail as the texture of the figure’s skin.

Though it’d be a stretch (particularly in the absence of any indication on Ferguson’s part) to suggest that the artist was drawing upon a visual tradition of Annunciations or angelic appearances, it is interesting to note that the cropping of the newspaper seller’s arm—coupled with the spotlight that illuminates the two figures—conveys something more otherworldly than a simple monetary transaction.

Max Ferguson. “My Father on Fifth Avenue.” 2011. Oil on Panel. 9½ x 12 inches.

My Father on Fifth Avenue, by comparison, is hardly otherworldly. In the painting, Ferguson’s father, clad in comfortable shoes and a striped shirt, sits on a park bench reading the newspaper. Fallen leaves litter the ground at his feet, and the stone wall behind his back is an abstract mosaic of gray stones—perhaps the way one might envision the parted Red Sea. Many of Ferguson’s paintings, including this one, evoke the work of Edward Hopper, whose figures are often lonely and forlorn. But though Ferguson’s father sits alone without another soul in sight, he is so engrossed in his newspaper that he doesn’t seem to mind.

Parade route, Fifth Avenue, Manhattan

Wednesday, May 9th, 2007

Question: Impressed or disappointed with the turnout at this year’s Salute to Israel Parade?



It’s hard to tell because last year I was actually marching in the parade together with my university. This is my first year viewing the parade from the audience’s perspective. It seems about the same as last year. It’s a totally different experience participating in the parade on the other side of the gate.

– Anton Urenshtein, student


Impressed. This year had a nice turnout. It helps that the weather was very accommodating as well. I was impressed to see all the different groups marching and the different communities coming together. It’s clear that people still come here every year to show their support. People gather here from all different boroughs for a good cause.

– Avi Saks, businessman


Some people have commented that the crowd seems smaller than last year’s, but I don’t find that to be true. This year’s enthusiasm seems stronger than last year’s, and people seem more involved.

– Avi Laub, financial services


Impressed. I’m finding that each year schools are doing a better job of getting organized. The crowd seems to really be enjoying the parade.

– Tammy Pak, teacher


Impressed. It was a nice turnout. I come here every year and I find that every year it gets better and better. There’s a great ruach in this crowd.

– Tzippi Rosen, social worker

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/parade-route-fifth-avenue-manhattan/2007/05/09/

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