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January 23, 2017 / 25 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘film’

Hollywood Movie Star Carrie Fisher in ICU After Massive Heart Attack

Sunday, December 25th, 2016

“Star Wars” actress Carrie Fisher, 60, was rushed to UCLA Medical Center on a respirator after suffering a massive heart attack Friday, just 15 minutes before arrival at LAX, on a United flight from London to Los Angeles.

United Airlines released a statement that was obtained by Variety, saying: “Medical personnel met United flight 935 from London to Los Angeles upon arrival today after the crew reported that a passenger was unresponsive,” the statement reads. “Our thoughts are with our customer at this time, and any requests for additional information should be directed to local authorities.”

A doctor and nurse who were on the flight immediately went into action, according to writer and actress Anna Akana, who was also on board the flight and who described what happened in a series of tweets. “Don’t know how else to process this but Carrie Fisher stopped breathing on the flight ho me. Hope’ she’s gonna be OK,” she wrote. “So many thanks to the United flight crew who jumped into action, and the awesome doctor and nurse passengers who helped… “

Actor Harrison Ford, who has co-starred with Fisher, also sent well wishes: “I’m shocked and saddened to hear the news about my dear friend. Our thoughts are with Carrie, her family and friends.”

Countless others tweeted well wishes as well.

The daughter of movie star Debbie Reynolds and singer Eddie Fisher, Carrie Fisher herself has been a Hollywood staple from her youth. But it wasn’t all roses: the actress has given interviews through the years in which she has discuss her diagnosis of bipolar disorder, ECT treatment (electroconvulsive therapy), which is sometimes used when medication has not proved helpful for depression or bipolar disorder, and her struggle with addiction to cocaine and prescription drugs.

Fisher is known for her portrayal of Princess Leia in the original “Star Wars” trilogy, which has become a cultural phenomenon and which spawned a series of spin-offs since the release of the first trio of films from 1977-1983.

“As if 2016 couldn’t get any worse… sending all our love to @carrieffisher” tweeted Mark Hamill, who plays her on-screen twin Luke Skywalker in the “Star Wars” saga.

Her brother, Todd Fisher, told Variety Magazine that his sister has been moved to the Intensive Care Unit, and later added on ABC7 Eyewitness News that she was getting “the best care she can receive. She’s obviously a very tough girl who’s survived many things,” he said. “I encourage everyone to pray for her.”

Fisher had just completed filming the third season of ‘Catastrophe’ – a comedy television series set in London, which airs on Amazon.

Hana Levi Julian

“Hate Spaces” Film Exposes Campus Intolerance

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016

{Originally posted to the IPT website}

A new documentary, “Hate Spaces,” exposes the epidemic of campus intolerance favoring Muslims and anti-Israel activists over Jews and Israel supporters when it comes to free speech, academic freedom, and protection from abuse.

The film is being released theatrically by Americans for Peace and Tolerance (APT), a Boston-based non-profit dedicated to raising public awareness about the increasingly hostile campus environment. “Hate Spaces” premiered Nov. 30 in New York, and will be screened at select locations around the country (contact info@peaceandtolerance.org for details). The film will also be available on DVD in early 2017 and eventually on YouTube. Click here to sign up for alerts.

The film’s title refers to the concept of “safe spaces” that has been used to silence unpopular speech on universities around the United States.

Executive Producer Avi Goldwasser, who also wrote and directed “Safe Spaces,” first noticed the extent of the campus problem in 2004, when he produced “Columbia Unbecoming.” That film documented the intimidation by Columbia University professors of Jewish students who supported Israel. “Jewish students were abused by faculty members and the administration ignored it,” Goldwasser told the Investigative Project on Terrorism (IPT). “The abusing professor got tenure.”

Indeed, anti-Israel lies, incitement, and hate speech are often tolerated under the banners of academic freedom and free speech. Last September, for example, the University of California, Berkeley reinstated a student-led course that presented a demonizing, one-sided history of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict after public outcry claimed that free speech and academic freedom were jeopardized by the course’s suspension. In contrast, pro-Israel speech is attacked by Israel critics who demand the right to have “safe spaces” free from “hate speech.”

“Any support of Israel is hate speech!” one protestor in the film proclaims.

Groups such as Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), the Muslim Student Association (MSA), and American Muslims for Palestine (AMP) leverage their politically favored status to exercise rights and protections that they try to deny their political opponents. At Northeastern University, SJP violated school policies over a two-year period, including “vandalism of university property, disrupting the events of other student organizations, not getting the appropriate permits when required, distributing unauthorized materials inside residence halls and sliding them under the doors of private rooms, not providing a ‘civility statement’ which was required after a previous sanction [and] not meeting with university advisers,” according to Northeastern spokeswoman Renata Nyul.

“We have zero tolerance for anti-Semitism, zero tolerance for racism or any kind of hatred,” Northeastern University President Joseph Aoun said in the film, defending his school’s decision to suspend SJP.

But SJP successfully reframed the school’s response as suppression of free speech and rallied public and media pressure until their suspension was lifted. Thus, in an SJP-dominated campus, speech that violates school policies and harasses Jews and Israel supporters is protected as “free speech” rather than punished as “hate speech.”

By contrast, critics of Islam have been silenced with accusations of “hate speech” and “Islamophobia.” In 2014, Brandeis University canceled a speaking invitation and honorary degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a campaigner for women’s rights and a fierce critic of Islam, after she was branded an “Islamophobe” by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). Around the same time, CAIR used similar accusations to stop the screening of a documentary on honor killings.

Meanwhile, Jewish students and organizations are targeted with impunity, as feckless college administrators hesitate to take remedial action (as happened at Connecticut College). One of the reasons for their reluctance, the film suggests, is fear of jeopardizing funding – collectively, over $1 billion over the last six years – from Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Through brazen lies – like claiming that Israel “commits genocide” and “apartheid” – SJP and MSA have created campus environments that are hostile to Jews and pro-Israel students, while suppressing support for Israel as “hate speech.”

“Hate Spaces” was a story that had to be told, Goldwasser said, because “most people do not realize how the hostility is being institutionalized, made fashionable by a combination of forces including radical faculty, radical student organizations, and an enabling university administration. While many anti-Jewish incidents and the BDS (boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel) campaign are reported by the media, few are willing to connect the dots and report on the underlying ideology and extremist organizations that are inciting the hostility.”

The film shows how such campus hostility can reach as far as student council meetings, events that should be focused on campus affairs and otherwise far-removed from Middle East politics. It features UCLA sophomore Rachel Beyda, who applied for a leadership position on the Undergraduate Students Association Council. She was challenged by an SJP-backed campaign that claimed her Jewish background would make her biased when deciding sensitive campus issues. For about 40 minutes, students questioned whether her Jewish identity would make her a less fair-minded leader, even though three other students deciding her fate had been similarly active in their respective communities (Iranian students’ group, the MSA, and the Sikh students’ group).

The film also highlights the extent of SJP’s infiltration into academia. The organization, which has ties to Muslim-Brotherhood-linked groups, has chapters on more than 600 campuses. “Hate Spaces” underscores how there is “sensitivity training” on many campuses for just about every group (including for bestiality and incest at Yale) but not when it comes to groups relating to Jews or Israel.

The film includes footage of SJP founder Hatem Bazian calling for an intifada in America during a 2004 San Francisco rally. In addition to heading the University of California, Berkeley’s Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project, Bazian is AMP’s founder and national chair. AMP provides funding, printed materials (including “Apartheid walls” for public demonstrations), and staff to SJP chapters.

“Hate Spaces” cites the IPT’s 2015 report about AMP support for Hamas and terrorism against Israel.

It includes footage from an AMP event with several disturbing quotes. “When I look at the people who fight with the Israeli Occupation Forces,” says AMP’s Munjed Ahmad in one example, “I don’t think we understand how many American Jews who were involved in the assault of Gaza the past summer were American…Of those people massacring those 500 children and those civilians, there were American Jews.”

Taher Herzallah asks: “What if as Muslims, we wanted to establish an Islamic State? Is that wrong? What if, as Muslims, we wanted to use violent means to resist occupation? Is that wrong?”

“Hate Spaces” attempts to explain how campuses became so hostile to Israel. By manipulating identity politics, SJP created an anti-Israel alliance of hard-left groups. They exploit the academically trendy concept of “intersectionality” – the idea that all injustices are interconnected – to demonize Israel and make common cause with activists from totally unrelated movements, like the campaign to address police violence.

SJP also attracts well-meaning students concerned about equality and social justice by portraying Palestinians as blameless victims of wholly unjustified Israeli attacks. “What drew me to SJP was my motivation to support equal human rights,” one student says in the film.I joined them because I felt that the Palestinian people were being oppressed.”

Another student explains how “SJP deliberately works with anti-Zionist Jewish organizations because working with those organizations helps to immunize them …against charges of bigotry and anti-Semitism. It gives SJP cover.”

“Hate Spaces” points out that student demographics have also helped SJP, because tens of thousands of students from Muslim countries that are traditionally hostile to Israel have arrived on U.S. college campuses in recent years. As noted by a former-SJP activist interviewed in the documentary, “There’s definitely a lot of ethnic solidarity between Muslims and Palestinians because [a] majority of the Palestinians are Muslims, so it’s almost like a brotherhood.”

Goldwasser describes the intended audience for “Hate Spaces” as “decent Americans, especially, those in leadership positions.” He believes that “once they are educated about this outrage on campus, there is a chance that changes will be made. All we ask is that Jewish students be treated equally, receive the same protection as any other minority on campus.”

The film notes that professors and administrators have only exacerbated the campus movement promoting BDS, through their indifference or open complicity with the movement’s campus leaders and tactics: “Many university officials are uncomfortable dealing with hatred that comes from a non-Western minority, preferring to selectively invoke the concepts of academic freedom and free speech instead of fulfilling their responsibility to Jewish students.”

Noah Beck

New Film Depicts Arab Queers as Bridge to Peace [video]

Monday, May 30th, 2016

Khader Abu Saif, Faddy Daim and Naim Girayes are three Arab homosexual friends living in Tel Aviv, a city where the last census counted 25% of the population as self declared gay. They’d like nothing more than to enjoy the gay life in the gayest city on the planet, and yet the term “Palestinian homo” conjures in the mind of most people they meet a kind of cartoon image, a stereotypical tag that has very little to do with them as individuals. “Oriented,” by Jewish British filmmaker Jake Wiesenfeld, is a new documentary making the rounds in festivals these days, examining their lives as they reject all these stereotypes, both as Arabs and as Israelis.

Khader Abu Saif is seen in one of the first scenes in the movie giving a lecture about his life as part of “a new Palestinian generation.” He relates an encounter with a British journalist who wanted to tell the world about Khader’s miserable life as a Palestinian homosexual and the daily suffering he must endure because of his two underdog identities. “So I told him, wait a minute, I think you reached the wrong person, because my parents know about me, they’ve accepted me and they totally love and support me. This things [you’re describing] doesn’t exist. So he tells me, ‘can you find me a gay Palestinian who is suffering?'”

His audience laugh, but soon enough Khader gets into a confrontation with a heckler over his identity. What kind of Arab is he, anyway? Does he carry the blue ID card or the orange one?

But the film leaves no doubt about the fact that in a region where gay people are thrown off rooftops, tied to chairs, Israel offers a paradise of equality and personal safety to Arab homosexuals, at least west of the green line and outside the Palestinian Authority and the Gaza Strip. But the film is not political, rather it examines everyday scenes in the lives of the three friends as they meet with family, and travel to a festival in Amman, Jordan, as well as the daily dialogue and existential conflicts they maintain with the Jewish and Arab society around them.

The three friends are far from being identical in their preferences and attitudes, especially when it comes to politics. Faddy Daim, who is depicted as the most anti-Zionist of the trio, refused to attend the gala screening of the film at the Tel Aviv Cinematheque, and refused to give interviews to Israeli media. Abu Saif explained that Faddy sees the film as “pink washing,” a term leftwing gays have coined to describe how Israel tries to cover up all its other “crimes” by showing how nice it is to gays, including Arab gays.

In the film, Faddy is tormented by the conflict between his ideology and his libido, when he falls in love with an Israeli man. “I’m feeling weak,” he says, “I’m in love with a Zionist.” He is not joking, he laments: “I’m in love with my enemy. I’m in love with everything against which I fight. I don’t have a problem with the fact that he is Jewish, I have a problem with the fact that he doesn’t think there’s such a thing as an Israeli occupation.”

The film depicts an Arab society which has gone a long way towards tolerating its gay members. It also offers criticism and praise of Israeli society from the Arab point of view. Which is why Khader Abu Saif is convinced both Arabs and Jews will hate the film, because it does not pander to anyone’s ideology. The three Arab characters appreciate the enormous advantages of living in a Western democracy, but are also angry at having to spend so much longer at the passport counter than their Israeli friends.

And because it doesn’t pander, and does not adopt either of the competing national narratives, the film can be the basis for real conversation between the two societies, never mind the politics.

The film “Oriented” will soon be available for downloading via iTunes, GooglePlay, and Amazon.

JNi.Media

Israeli General Counseling Police Protecting Cannes Film Festival

Sunday, May 8th, 2016

Cannes mayor David Lisnard commissioned from Anti-terrorism expert Brig. Gen. Res. Nitzan Nuriel a full security audit for the city of Canne as it prepares for this Wednesday’s opening of Europe’s most important and most glamorous film Festival, on the French Riviera. The mayor and French security forces are determined to prevent a repeat of last November’s murderous attack on the capital Paris.

The Cannes Film Festival which opens May 11 will run through May 22.

A spokesperson at the Alpes-Maritimes district headquarters which has jurisdiction over Cannes and Nice said Nuriel’s recommendations are being applied to strengthen control of every entry point to the town including maritime checks on Cannes bay.

Before going into business for himself, serving on the advisory boards of large scale companies such as World Patent Marketing, among other things, Nuriel had served as the Director of the Counter-Terrorism Board under the Israeli Prime Minister’s Office. He also served for many years as the Military Attaché to the Israeli Embassy in Washington DC, acting as the official liaison between Israel, the US Army, Marine Corps, Special Operations Command, FEMA, and Homeland Security.

According to The Local, French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve intends to supervise the Festival’s measures, promising “the highest level of security possible given the context of the terrorist threat.”

Hollywood stars Julia Roberts, Jodi Foster, Sean Penn, Robert De Niro, Kirsten Dunst, Charlize Theron, George Clooney and Jeff Bridges are expected to be in attendance for the festivities. And so police have been training to thwart a variety of scenarios. Last month police staged a simulated terror attack on the Palais des Festivals, which shows the films competing for the Palme d’Or. They also simulated a car bomb attack on a local school.

More than 500 security personnel as well as paramilitary gendarmes will patrol the Palais des Festivals area.

Mayor Lisnard said police were ordered to “randomly search people in the street. We are taking all measures so that the festival will be both safe and popular.”

David Israel

‘Son of Saul’ – Hungarian Film about the Holocaust Wins Golden Globe [video]

Monday, January 11th, 2016

“Son of Saul,” a 2015 Hungarian film directed by László Nemes and co-written by Nemes and Clara Royer, has won a Golden Globe award Sunday night at the Beverly Hilton. The film is about a Hungarian-Jewish Sonderkommando, burning the dead in Auschwitz, who one day finds the body of a boy he believes is his son.

Nemes told the audience in his acceptance comments, “The Holocaust has become, over the years, an abstraction. For me, it’s more of a face, a human face. Let us not forget this face.”

Nemes told reporters Sunday, “We see that genocides are still going on, they haven’t stopped. I think we have to look into the human soul, and cinema can do that in a very visceral way. I think that’s why I wanted to make this film.”

Nemes, who is Jewish, told Anthem Magazine last year, in Cannes: “We were tired of the usual representation of the Holocaust. We were just sick of it. We tried to design a story, a film, that doesn’t function the same way and we tried to break away from codes. The film was born out of the frustration and the need to talk about that. Then we came across the material and the Sonderkommando writings that sort of mapped out the inner thinkings of these workers. From that, we got the one-liner for the story out of the blue. This guy finds a body and there’s a moral dilemma: What is he supposed to do? That’s how the project started.”

JNi.Media

Farewell to Jewish Actor, Singer Theodore Bikel, 91

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

An icon of the stage, the silver screen and the Land of Israel has gone home.

Jewish actor, singer and philanthropist Theodore Bikel has passed away of natural causes at the age of 91. Bikel drew his final breath Tuesday morning at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, his agent Robert Malcolm told The Associated Press.

Bikel was the symbol of a generation – several generations, in fact.

Jews remember the songs of Theodore Bikel when he was still singing them in Yiddish on a 78 rpm record, spun on my parents’ record player. When he was Tevye, in Fiddler on the Roof. When he was a Jewish folk singer.

Born in Vienna in 1924, the young Bikel moved with his family to Palestine as a teenager.

He spent much of his youth there, discovering his passion for drama while living on a kibbutz. By 1943 was acting in Tel Aviv’s HaBima Theater. He moved on to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London in 1946.

Bikel sang in 21 languages, recording more than 20 contemporary and folk music albums, in addition to albums in Yiddish. He helped found the Newport Folk Festival in 1959.

His repertoire was endless. He appeared in opera productions, on television shows, on the Broadway stage and on the silver screen.

Bikel received an Oscar nomination for his 1958 portrayal of a Southern sheriff in “The Defiant Ones,” and played the grumpy Soviet submarine captain in the Oscar-nominated 1966 Cold War comedy “The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming.”

A fierce supporter of Jewish causes, the Democratic Party and human rights groups, Theodore Bikel was one of six American Jewish Congress leaders arrested in 1986 while protesting outside the embassy of the Soviet Union, demanding “Let My People Go!”

Bikel is survived by his wife Aimee Ginsburg, his sons Rob and Danny Bikel, stepsons Ze’ev and Noam Ginsburg and three grandchildren.

Baruch Dayan Emet.

Hana Levi Julian

Israel’s Human Rights and Historic Heroism

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai takes issue with statements made by former Iranian president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, who called Israel “forged and temporary.” Yishai says that while Iran is a repressed society in which democratic aspirations are quashed, Israel is a beacon of human rights with proven historic staying-power. But, he warns, Israel needs to keep hitting that concept home.

Then, Yishai is joined by Knesset insider Jeremy Saltan for a lightning news wrap: Six Arab-Israeli teachers in the Negev have been found to be ISIS-supporters; the budget is being delayed; IDF service is being shortened; and more.

Finally, Yishai is joined by super-IDF-soldier Shai Ish Shalom, who remembers the hostage-rescue operation at Entebbe in 1976, recalling the precision-fighting during the fateful moments of the raid. VOI’s Judy Balint joins in to recount the last official commemoration ceremony of the raid, called Operation Thunderbolt/Yonatan, held in 2001.
Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
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Moshe Herman

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/multimedia/radio/yishai-fleisher-on-jewishpress/israels-human-rights-and-historic-heroism/2015/07/08/

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