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Posts Tagged ‘Food’

Daf Yomi

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Soul Food
‘It Comes To Include A Fragrance’
(Niddah 52a)

One must recite a berachah prior to eating (berachah rishonah) and another one after eating (berachah acharonah). The mishnah on 51b states that there are some instances where only a berachah rishonah is required.

The Gemara explains that the mishnah is referring to someone who smells a pleasant fragrance. He should recite a berachah (“borei minei besamim”) prior to smelling the fragrance, but not afterwards.

Why not? Rashi (s.v. “reichani”) explains that one berachah is sufficient since smelling only provides a han’ah mu’etes, a limited amount of pleasure.

Quick And Immediate

Alternatively, the Kol Bo (cited by Sha’arei Tziyun, Orach Chayim 216, sk3) explains that there is a time limit within which a berachah acharonah may be recited. The berachah acharonah after eating must be recited before the food is digested. If a longer period has elapsed and a person no longer feels satiated from his meal, he may no longer recite a berachah acharonah. By the same token, a person does not recite a berachah acharonah after smelling a fragrance because the pleasure he derives does no linger. Thus the time limit to recite a berachah acharonahin the instance of a fragrance expires immediately.

No Bodily Benefit

The Me’iri (Yalkut Hame’iri citing Berachos 42b) offers yet another reason. He writes that smell is something that benefits the soul, but not the body. Therefore, one cannot say the berachah acharonah.

This week’s Daf Yomi Highlights is based upon Al Hadaf, published by Cong. Al Hadaf, 17N Rigaud Rd., Spring Valley, NY 10977-2533. Al Hadaf, published semi-monthly, is available by subscription: U.S. – $40 per year; Canada – $54 per year; overseas – $65 per year. For dedication information contact Rabbi Zev Dickstein, editor, at 845-356-9114 or visit Alhadafyomi.org.

The No-Potato Passover: A Journey of Food, Travel & Color

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Good news – having fun with your food is not just for silly kids! Skim the pages of this colorful funfest of food and count the low calories in these carb-lite delights. Even men who “don’t eat green” will probably want to try out the easy to prepare, hearty dishes.

Most of the No-Potato Passover recipes are as casual as the title’s spelling: some include only six ingredients and limited prep time – half to one full hour. They’re good for heart health and waistlines, too.

Full-color pictures in the No-Potato Passover: A Journey of Food, Travel & Color demonstrate the finished products. A graduate of the French Culinary Institute, author Aviva Kanoff blended her food prep knowledge with a degree in studio art from Hunter College. She took photos while collecting delicious, simple recipes native to specific spots around the world. The end result is your way out of the “rut” that Kanoff insists many cooks dig for themselves. Relying on a too-common standby of three to four meals, we tend to bore our taste buds and fellow diners even more at the 24 usually potato-heavy Passover meals. The No-Potato Passover provides an easy way out of the “Not this again?” and “Did we buy prunes?” problem.

Pomegranate Brisket

How much variety exists in this novel approach to Pesach dining? Think Passover Pesto, meaty matza balls, lavender mint chicken and no-bake chocolate mousse pie. Super foods that pack the power of high nutrition with few calories are included, too.

Pesto Chicken Pasta

If you’re like many Pesach cooks wondering what to do with Passover cake meal, you’re in for delicious delights with the desert section. Think “Viennese Crunch” or “Raspberry Shortcake Trifle” among other possibilities. Consider buying two copies of the cookbook so you and anyone looking over your shoulder won’t fight over who’s having more fun with it at any given time.

Chocolate Mousse Pie

The book has only problem: like many others, it doesn’t lay flat when you want to follow a recipe. With a clear plastic cookbook protector, though, this 168-page hardcover stays put without closing itself on the instructions you need. But bless her heart, Kanoff included such intriguing photos of faraway places that you’ll be tempted to flip through the pages. The No Potato Passover: A Journey of Food, Travel & Color is an education into cuisine as the result of topography and geography! Share it with friends and family for a delicious holiday on many levels.

Freeze With Ease

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

           I have received numerous inquiries asking me to revisit my freezer tricks.  It is really important for the homemaker, during this tough economic climate, to be able to stretch her/his food budget.

 

I meet many people who are simply “afraid” to freeze any food, simply because they have had bad “freezer-tasting” food in the past.  That is a false assumption because the food they ate was just frozen but stored the wrong way.  It’s like trying to make cholent in a frying pan!

 

You must learn the proper technique and correct storage containers to use for that exact purpose.  In my experience, I have found hundreds − if not thousands − of dollars a year are saved when you can cook, freeze and store food correctly.  Of course, I am not even mentioning the hours you will save in time because you do not have to “waste” time cooking fresh food every day of your life.

 

             Freezing is simple and the most time-efficient way to preserve foods at home.  It is important to note that freezing does not improve the quality of foods; but when properly done it can preserve most of the quality of the fresh product.  Food stored constantly at zero degrees will always be safe.  Also, if you have an electrical blackout, a full freezer will keep food frozen in your freezer for 72 hours.  Food in a half-full freezer will only stay for 12 hours.

 

One of my customers did an experiment with her family.  She did it to prove to her husband, who said he would never eat anything that was frozen. It seems he had bad experiences from his childhood years, when his mother would serve frozen, dried-out food to him and his siblings.  She was a working mother with no other choice. She used cheap plastic takeout containers and lots of foil and plastic bags to store the food in the freezer.  These cheaper quality containers are not meant for the vapors and low temperatures that exist in a zero degree environment.  The food would lose its quality and get a “freezer burn,” thereby robbing it of its good taste and appearance.

 

His favorite food was spaghetti and meatballs.  She prepared the recipe as usual, but instead of freezing the meatballs in cheap containers immediately with the sauce, she used my tricks and saved herself literally hours of time.  Here is the trick:  Separate the cooked meatballs from the sauce.  Line a cookie sheet or flat board with foil.  Foil acts as a conductor and will “quick-freeze” any food sitting on it in the freezer.  Place the meatballs side by side, like rows of cookies, on the foil – minus the sauce. 

 

Depending on your particular freezer, it may take an hour, more or less, to “quick freeze.”   Place the hardened meatballs in any Tupperware freezer container, tall or flat.  Container shape will not matter.  They will come out individually since there is no sauce binding them together.  Freeze the sauce separately.  Make sure to label the containers on the outside.  Frozen food can look alike.

 

I had a customer tell me she once prepared a meal using some of her frozen unlabeled stock.   She was sure she would remember what it was. Lo and behold, she said her “soup turned to fish” when it defrosted!

 

Sauce can be frozen in bulk or in individual, smaller 2-cup Tupperware containers.  (There is a big freezer container sale now in Tupperware until the end of December – so take advantage!)  If you do freeze in larger containers and only need a small amount of sauce for those six meatballs you removed for a child, just run some warm water from the sink over the container.  On a cutting board, slide out the “brick” of sauce. Run very hot water on a sharp serrated knife, and “slice” the amount of sauce you need.  The rest was not defrosted, so you may return it to the freezer safely for later use.  Remember, you cannot refreeze fully defrosted cooked food.

 

Now back to my customer and her doubtful husband.  She served her family about 85 meatballs over a period of four weeks with the sauce she made a month earlier – and no one knew the difference!  Of course, she cooked her spaghetti and other side dishes fresh each time.

 

She never told her husband what she did and still now freezes many of her food for her family.  She recently told me she feels like a “liberated” woman!  She has more time to devote to her other interests that she had put off.  Very important to remember: you must reheat the food properly as well.  Tupperware has the most efficient microwave line of products that heat your food evenly and completely. No one can tell it was previously frozen.

 

The above tricks are just some of the many tips I share in my cookbook, Not Just A Cookbook.   Some of my customers tell me that when they read the book, they “hear” my voice.  I also do “Freezer Class Demos” for my Tupperware customers. 

 

I will be having a “vendors” table, IY”H, at the upcoming Toras Emes Chanukah Boutique on motzaei Shabbos, December 6. It runs from 6:30-10 p.m.  Please come and say hello.  I will have lots of discounted items, plus copies of my book for purchase.  There will be raffle drawings from the event, and I will be giving a free gift with each purchase!

 

In my next column, I will continue providing more tips on the proper way to freeze fish, vegetables – and more!

 

Over 550 recipes and tips are featured in Rochelle’s humorous and entertaining cookbook, Not Just A Cookbook.  It also features many “multiethnic” recipes that were adapted for the kosher cook.  Rochelle’s book examines food around the year by month. What a great gift!  Check out www.notjustacookbook.com for free recipes and to order your copy online, or call 718-258-0415 for store information.  Rochelle has been a Custom Kitchen Planning expert, using Tupperware containers for over 30 years. She is available for cooking demo events, fundraisers, and Tupperware demos.   Go to www.my.tupperware.com/rochellerothman. Call to find out about the super sales for fall. Note: Special book sale − buy 6 get 1 free!

Freeze With Ease

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

           I have received numerous inquiries asking me to revisit my freezer tricks.  It is really important for the homemaker, during this tough economic climate, to be able to stretch her/his food budget.


 


I meet many people who are simply “afraid” to freeze any food, simply because they have had bad “freezer-tasting” food in the past.  That is a false assumption because the food they ate was just frozen but stored the wrong way.  It’s like trying to make cholent in a frying pan!

 

You must learn the proper technique and correct storage containers to use for that exact purpose.  In my experience, I have found hundreds − if not thousands − of dollars a year are saved when you can cook, freeze and store food correctly.  Of course, I am not even mentioning the hours you will save in time because you do not have to “waste” time cooking fresh food every day of your life.

 

             Freezing is simple and the most time-efficient way to preserve foods at home.  It is important to note that freezing does not improve the quality of foods; but when properly done it can preserve most of the quality of the fresh product.  Food stored constantly at zero degrees will always be safe.  Also, if you have an electrical blackout, a full freezer will keep food frozen in your freezer for 72 hours.  Food in a half-full freezer will only stay for 12 hours.

 

One of my customers did an experiment with her family.  She did it to prove to her husband, who said he would never eat anything that was frozen. It seems he had bad experiences from his childhood years, when his mother would serve frozen, dried-out food to him and his siblings.  She was a working mother with no other choice. She used cheap plastic takeout containers and lots of foil and plastic bags to store the food in the freezer.  These cheaper quality containers are not meant for the vapors and low temperatures that exist in a zero degree environment.  The food would lose its quality and get a “freezer burn,” thereby robbing it of its good taste and appearance.

 

His favorite food was spaghetti and meatballs.  She prepared the recipe as usual, but instead of freezing the meatballs in cheap containers immediately with the sauce, she used my tricks and saved herself literally hours of time.  Here is the trick:  Separate the cooked meatballs from the sauce.  Line a cookie sheet or flat board with foil.  Foil acts as a conductor and will “quick-freeze” any food sitting on it in the freezer.  Place the meatballs side by side, like rows of cookies, on the foil – minus the sauce. 

 

Depending on your particular freezer, it may take an hour, more or less, to “quick freeze.”   Place the hardened meatballs in any Tupperware freezer container, tall or flat.  Container shape will not matter.  They will come out individually since there is no sauce binding them together.  Freeze the sauce separately.  Make sure to label the containers on the outside.  Frozen food can look alike.

 

I had a customer tell me she once prepared a meal using some of her frozen unlabeled stock.   She was sure she would remember what it was. Lo and behold, she said her “soup turned to fish” when it defrosted!

 

Sauce can be frozen in bulk or in individual, smaller 2-cup Tupperware containers.  (There is a big freezer container sale now in Tupperware until the end of December – so take advantage!)  If you do freeze in larger containers and only need a small amount of sauce for those six meatballs you removed for a child, just run some warm water from the sink over the container.  On a cutting board, slide out the “brick” of sauce. Run very hot water on a sharp serrated knife, and “slice” the amount of sauce you need.  The rest was not defrosted, so you may return it to the freezer safely for later use.  Remember, you cannot refreeze fully defrosted cooked food.

 

Now back to my customer and her doubtful husband.  She served her family about 85 meatballs over a period of four weeks with the sauce she made a month earlier – and no one knew the difference!  Of course, she cooked her spaghetti and other side dishes fresh each time.

 

She never told her husband what she did and still now freezes many of her food for her family.  She recently told me she feels like a “liberated” woman!  She has more time to devote to her other interests that she had put off.  Very important to remember: you must reheat the food properly as well.  Tupperware has the most efficient microwave line of products that heat your food evenly and completely. No one can tell it was previously frozen.

 

The above tricks are just some of the many tips I share in my cookbook, Not Just A Cookbook.   Some of my customers tell me that when they read the book, they “hear” my voice.  I also do “Freezer Class Demos” for my Tupperware customers. 

 

I will be having a “vendors” table, IY”H, at the upcoming Toras Emes Chanukah Boutique on motzaei Shabbos, December 6. It runs from 6:30-10 p.m.  Please come and say hello.  I will have lots of discounted items, plus copies of my book for purchase.  There will be raffle drawings from the event, and I will be giving a free gift with each purchase!

 

In my next column, I will continue providing more tips on the proper way to freeze fish, vegetables – and more!

 

Over 550 recipes and tips are featured in Rochelle’s humorous and entertaining cookbook, Not Just A Cookbook.  It also features many “multiethnic” recipes that were adapted for the kosher cook.  Rochelle’s book examines food around the year by month. What a great gift!  Check out www.notjustacookbook.com for free recipes and to order your copy online, or call 718-258-0415 for store information.  Rochelle has been a Custom Kitchen Planning expert, using Tupperware containers for over 30 years. She is available for cooking demo events, fundraisers, and Tupperware demos.   Go to www.my.tupperware.com/rochellerothman. Call to find out about the super sales for fall. Note: Special book sale − buy 6 get 1 free!

Title: Nutrilicious: Food for Thought and Whole Health – Natural Whole Vegetarian Kosher Cuisine

Wednesday, October 10th, 2007

Title: Nutrilicious: Food for Thought and Whole Health – Natural Whole Vegetarian Kosher Cuisine

Author: Edith Rothschild
Publisher: Feldheim

 

         Vegans and anyone on a diet will appreciate Edith Rothschild’s appealing paperback sized as an 8-inch by 11-inch workbook.

 

         The author elicits her first giggles when readers notice her medical disclaimer on the first pages of the cookbook: “The author assumes no responsibility for the side effects that may occur when embarking on a healthier lifestyle, such as a feeling of buoyancy, a sense of being in control of your life” and other empowering consequences.

 

         Readers new to or still learning about nutritional cooking will appreciate the diagrams, color-coded charts and other suggestions presented throughout the easily turned pages. This self-service cookbook covers tables with good food and lots of insight. Stories, poems and jokes abound to add insight to the vegetarian take on life. You won’t go hungry after you take this book into the kitchen. The Pesach Without Panic chapter alone deserves to become a classic in even the homes of carnivorous Jews.

 

         The Chida’s prayer for health has the last word in this text, underscoring the benefits of Nutrilicious: Food for Thought and Whole Health – Natural Whole Vegetarian Kosher Cuisine. Buy this innovative cookbook for your school, seminary, yeshiva, restaurant and home. Diners will be glad you did.

 

 


Yocheved Golani is the author of It’s MY Crisis! And I’ll Cry If I Need To: A Life Book for Helping You to Dry Your Tears and Cope With a Medical Challenge (Booklocker Publishing).

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-nutrilicious-food-for-thought-and-whole-health-natural-whole-vegetarian-kosher-cuisine/2007/10/10/

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