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June 26, 2016 / 20 Sivan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘foreign’

Bereaved Mother at Knesset NGO Law Debate: ‘Foreign Countries Are Funding Terror’

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

Devorah Gonen, whose son Danny was murdered by a terrorist while he was hiking near Dolev in Judea and Samaria, told the Knesset Constitution, Law and Justice Committee on Wednesday that the attorneys for her son’s killer were funded by foreign countries. “These funds encourage murder,” she said. “The terrorist knew he would be defended [in court] and that his family would receive funding. The terrorist is still alive, and his family will get a generous support, and I am left with the ‘privilege’ of being a bereaved mother. Foreign countries are funding terror. You must take the consequences of the foreign funding into account.”

The Committee debated a bill requiring NGOs that receive more than 50% of their funding from foreign governments to declare this fact in every publication and at meetings with public officials. The government-sponsored bill had been returned to the committee for hearings and amendments after passing a first reading in the plenum.

During the meeting, MK Yael German (Yesh Atid) argued that an NGO may receive small donations from a number of countries and one large donation from one country, so the legislation “would not help us know how the donations are distributed.”

MK Zouheir Bahloul (Zionist Camp) told the bereaved Gonen: “I sympathize with your feelings and feel the pain of the tragedy you experienced. However, the State of Israel receives billions from foreign countries, and it uses these funds to wage wars which kill people.”

MK Tamar Zandberg (Meretz) added that “government funds are transferred to NGOs for the purpose of building [Jewish] outposts from which terrorist operations emanate. This money is not transparent, and it is kept confidential in the Registrar of Non-Profit Organizations.”

Committee Chairman MK Nissan Slomiansky (HaBayit HaYehudi) said representatives from foreign embassies in Israel had asked to participate in the meeting, but he requested that they take part in next week’s debate instead. However, a representative from the Dutch embassy was allowed to audit the meeting nevertheless.

David Israel

Polish Foreign Minister to visit Yad Vashem Wednesday

Monday, June 13th, 2016

The Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland, Witold Waszczykowski will, visit Yad Vashem on Wednesday.  The Minister will tour the Holocaust History Museum, participate in a memorial ceremony in the Hall of Remembrance, visit the Children’s Memorial and sign the Yad Vashem Guest Book.

David Israel

Justice Ministry Issues List of 27 NGOs that Must Disclose They Work for Foreign Entities

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

The Justice Minsitry NGO Registrar on Thursday published the official document detailing the 27 NGOs and Associations which would be compelled to mention in all their official literature that the bulk of their funding comes from foreign countries, and their representatives would have to wear special ID tags while visiting the Knesset — should the “NGO Law” be passed. The law was initiated by Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked (Habayit Hayehudi).

The list was published upon request by five opposition members of the Knesset Constitution Committee of the Knesset legal adviser Eyal Yinon, after the Committee Chair, MK Nissan Slomiansky (Habayit Hayehudi), had refused to reveal the list. The opposition members were concerned that Slomiansky refuses to share the list because it proves that the law affects primarily leftwing organizations.

The list notes the names of the NGOs, next to their annual turnover, the amount they received from foreign entities and the percentage of their income those foreign funds constitute.

Attorney Talia Sasson, President of the New Israel Fund, said on Thursday that about half the NGOs on the list receive funding from NIF.

In 2005, Talia Sasson issued the Sasson Report, an official Israeli government report that concluded that Israeli state entities had been discreetly diverting millions of shekels to build settlements and illegal outposts in Judea and Samaria. The report was rife with inaccuracies and outright lies, including intentional misquotes of the dates when settlements had been approved so that they would appear illegal.

Here are a few choice NGOs who are, for all intents and purposes, foreign agents working to influence Israeli policy:

B’Tzelem | Annual turnover: $2,353,140.50 | Foreign donations: $1,615,337.99 | % Foreign donations: 69%

Breaking the Silence | Annual turnover: $984,838.30 | Foreign donations: $594,868.58 | % Foreign donations: 60%

Committee Against Torture in Israel | Annual turnover: $604,243.26 | Foreign donations: $606,809.34 | % Foreign donations: 100%

Akevot: Trace: Institute for the Study of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Annual turnover: $118,907.99 | Foreign donations: $118,909.79 | % Foreign donations: 100%

Hallo Trust Ltd. | Annual turnover: $1,099,469.33| Foreign donations: $1,019,386.18 | % Foreign donations: 93%

The NGO Ir Amim, which on Thursday appealed to the Supreme Court to ban Jerusalem Liberation Day flag marchers from entering the Muslim Quarter Sunday, has an annual turnover of $844,539.90, out of which 64%, or $537,405.17 come from foreign entities. It is the most current and vivid example of how the will of the majority of Jews living in Israel is being directly subverted using millions of dollars from groups which are often the declared or tacit enemies of the Jewish State.

It should be noted that US organizations that receive any of their funding—not 50% or more as the Shaked bill demands—from non-American sources must register as foreign agents in their dealing with any of the branches of government.

David Israel

Report: US Using Foreign Aid to Damage Israel’s Military Industry

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

The security agreement between the US and Israel is yet to be signed, and as time goes by it appears that the Americans are in no hurry to complete the deal, Walla reported on Tuesday. Sources at the defense ministry who expected the US aid package to be agreed on by the Passover holiday are seeing the weeks since that target date passing by with little movement from Washington. So far, the Obama Administration has decided to increase the security aid budget to Israel above the current annual $3.2 billion, but in addition they would like to reduce the portion of the budget which may be converted from USD to shekels for IDF purchases from Israeli security manufacturers. That last part would be the most painful, with long-term consequences for Israel’s security.

As part of the US aid package in the past, Israel was allowed to convert a quarter of the money into 3 billion shekel ($786 million) for purchases from Israeli companies. The Israelis object to the American decision to bite into that part of the package, because it would result in a long-term effect on Israel’s defense budget and its military industrial complex.

A former senior defense apparatus official told Walla that “the US plan to cancel the conversion to shekels, even if it’s only a reduction, would have a significant effect on the attractiveness of the entire US security aid package.”

The aid budget offer as it stands today is far lower than Israel’s stated ambition at the start of negotiations with the US. Congressional sources have said that Israel was asking for $4 to $5 billion a year, which over the span of the deal, from 2019 to 2028, could total $50 billion — compared with $30 billion for the 2009 to 2018 package signed with President George W. Bush. The final deal will likely fall between $37.5 billion—the US position, and $40 billion—the amount Israel has come down to. Even at the minimalist, US version, Israel still receives a bump of $750 million over 10 years.

Today the US pays for $3 billion out of Israel’s $15.6 billion defense budget.

The defense source speaking to Walla said an American decision to keep the entire aid package in dollars, to be spent only with US manufacturers, could mean serious out-of-pocket costs for Israel. “For instance,” he explained, “when we purchase the F-35 from the US, it comes with additional derivatives paid for in shekels: we are expected to build an advanced infrastructure for the new squadron, as well as specialized maintenance and special takeoff lanes—for which the US budget converted part would have paid. Cutting it would directly harm the defense budget as well as the military industries.”

Incidentally, as Defense News reported in April, Israel is demanding of Lockheed Martin and the F-35 Joint Program Office to maximize its autonomy over its new stealth fighter force, including its own command, control, communications and computing (C4) system, indigenous weaponry and the ability to perform heavy maintenance in-country rather than at predetermined regional overhaul facilities. No other buyer has asked or received these exceptions for a system that’s considered the most advanced and secret in the US’ possession.

Brig. Gen. Tal Kalman, IAF chief of staff, told an audience in Tel Aviv this year that Israel’s “unique requirements” demand independence in maintaining the stealth fighters. Speaking on Sunday at a conference of Israel Defense and the Fisher Institute for Strategic Air and Space Studies, Kalman said the IAF is going for a “phased and coordinated process” to establish an F-35 logistics center at squadron headquarters at Nevatim Air Base in southern Israel.

JNi.Media

Why I’m Still Nervous About Trump’s Foreign Policy Rhetoric

Sunday, May 15th, 2016

Last fall, as the presidential primary season was about to begin, I was concerned about what the Middle East policy of a Trump administration might look like. Trump’s failure to address Iran’s hegemonic ambitions, along with his deference to Russian autocrat President Vladimir Putin, was perilously similar to the approach taken by President Obama.

Six months later, Trump has emerged as the Republican nominee but his achievement hasn’t altered my worries about how he would shape American foreign policy. Before explaining why, I think it’s worth making some general observations about Trump’s approach to politics, so as to put all this in context.

First, one has to distinguish between Trump’s sensibilities and Trump’s abilities. He is not a stupid man (far from it) and he flourishes when his rivals underestimate him. But he clearly distrusts intellectuals, cares little for history, and disdains the kinds of political speeches that are peppered with literary and philosophical references.

For all his bombast about making America great again, references to the Founding Fathers, the U.S. Constitution, and the endurance of the American republic across nearly three centuries all are conspicuous by their absence from his podium addresses. All we are told is that “it’s gonna be fabulous.” We just don’t know quite how.

Yet when it comes to the operational aspects of his campaign, Trump has shown himself to be a master communicator in terms of the timing of his messages. In every tussle and confrontation he has proved that whatever doesn’t kill him makes him stronger. Trump’s insertion of TV reality show values into the presidential contest is jarring and crude, but it has worked for him so far.

Season 1 of “Trump” just ended with his assumption of the GOP nomination. Season 2, his contest with Hillary Clinton, is just beginning. If we get to a Season 3, it’s because Trump is in the White House. Season 4? That means a further presidential term. We have to hope that Trump has enough respect for the two-term presidential limit for there not to be a Season 5.

I make that last point because, in studying Trump’s style and discussing his campaign with friends and political contacts, I’ve noted a couple of observations that are regularly made. First, that it is pretty much impossible to find a proto-Trump among the individuals who have already served as president of the world’s greatest democracy. Second, that therefore leads to comparisons with foreign leaders, none of them remotely encouraging.

I’ve seen or heard Trump invoked alongside Hugo Chavez, the late Venezuelan tyrant; Juan Peron, the former Argentine dictator; and Jean Marie Le Pen, the former leader of France’s National Front party and the most prominent of Europe’s postwar neo-fascists.

Indeed, the respected political analyst Daniel Pipes, a conservative, has made a persuasive case that Trump is deserving of the neo-fascist label.

Trump has done little to allay these anxieties. Even though some of his advisers want him to be more “presidential,” which in his case simply means not tossing out bizarre conspiracy theories and puerile insults, he is not at this point prepared to transform his rhetoric. Nor is he willing to disavow the ravings of his supporters on social media, many of whom have descended into open anti-Semitism in attacking the their guru’s critics.

One such target was Julia Ioffe, a Jewish journalist who recently penned an unflattering portrayal of Trump’s wife Melania for GQ magazine. Ioffe quickly found herself receiving threats in the form of Nazi imagery and anonymous phone calls consisting of recorded Hitler speeches. When CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asked Trump about the baiting of Ioffe by his supporters, his response was, “I don’t know about that. I don’t know anything about that…You’ll have to talk to them about it.… I don’t have a message to the fans.”

This is exactly the Trump many of us have come to know and dislike and even fear. In a purely abstract sense, it is conceivable that a President Trump could be more of an international statesman than seems possible at present; as in sports, nothing in politics should ever be discounted. Nevertheless, there is precious little evidence for the moment to back up such an assertion.

When it comes to relations with America’s allies, it is deeply troubling that the only foreign leader of whom he speaks with consistent respect is Putin. Trump is still smarting from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s rejection of his unconstitutional proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States. Ditto for British Prime Minister David Cameron, who called Trump’s demand “stupid and wrong.”

Entering office with a record of contemptuous remarks about the leaders of our traditional allies is hardly a solid foundation on which to build the relationships a neophyte like Trump will need – and need them he will – in order to conduct foreign policy.

While I believe we need to prepare ourselves for the possibility of a Trump presidency, I cannot find even a grain of comfort when it comes to projecting what his foreign policy will involve. One of his advisers recently told the journalist Ruthie Blum, with regards to negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians, “I can’t think of a better guy who can sit at the table and try to bring everybody together.”

This mantra from the Trump camp, and its underlying hubris, will be sorely tested should he be inaugurated in January.

(JNS)

Ben Cohen

Norwegian Foreign Minister Tells Abbas Paying Killer Prisoners ‘Unacceptable’

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

On Tuesday, Norwegian Foreign Minister Børge Brende, who is touring the Middle East, met with PA Chairman Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah, and told him that the “extensive support program” of his government, making payments to security prisoners (terrorists) in Israeli jails, is unacceptable and should stop, Dagen reported Wednesday.

The payment program was first exposed by PMW in 2011.

Ignoring the basic financial concept of “fungibility”, Abbas responded that the program is not using Norwegian funds, which Brende confirmed, but reiterated that, nevertheless, the PA must stop the payments, “for their own good.”

As PMW has pointed out in the past, Abbas’s response inadvertently confirmed that it is the Palestinian Authority and not the PLO, as they previously claimed, who is paying the jailed terrorists.

The issue had been raised in the Norwegian parliament by Hans Olav Syversen (Christian Democrati), during last week’s oral question period, and Brende promised then to put further pressure on Abbas at the next opportunity. Brende now confirmed that the security prisoners’ salaries were discussed during his meeting in Ramallah.

Syversen alleged that for years, the Palestinian Authority has been paying wages to terrorists sentenced to prison, and the worse their crime, the more money they get. In reality, the payment amounts may be directly tied to the amount of time the terrorist spends in jail as opposed to the actual crime.

Brende met with Prime Minister Netanyahu earlier on Tuesday, in Jerusalem.

David Israel

US Investment in – NOT Foreign Aid to – Israel

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

In 2016, Israel is a major contributor to – and a global co-leader with – the USA in the areas of research, development, manufacturing and launching of micro (100 kg), mini (300 kg) and medium (1,000 kg) size satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), as well as joint space missions, space communications and space exploration sounding rocket and scientific balloon flights. According to NASA Administrator, Charles Bolden, “Israel is known for its innovation. The October 15, 2015 joint agreement gives us the opportunity to cooperate with Israel on the journey to Mars, [highlighting Israel’s unique, extremely lightweight technologies, which conserve energy]….”

Israel is no longer a supplicant – as it used to be in its early years of independence – transformed from a net-national security and economic consumer to a net-national security and economic producer, generating substantial, military and commercial dividends to the US, which exceed the highly appreciated $3.1 BN annual investment, in Israel, by the US.

The annual US investment in Israel – erroneously defined as “foreign aid” (Foreign Military Financing) – has yielded one of the highest rates of return on US investments overseas. Israel is neither “foreign,” nor does it receive “aid.”

From a one-way-street relationship, the US-Israel connection has evolved into an exceptionally productive two-way-street, mutually-beneficial alliance. The US is the senior partner, and Israel the junior partner, in a win-win, geo-strategic partnership, which transcends the 68-year-old tension between all US presidents (from Truman through Obama) and Israeli prime ministers (from Ben Gurion through Netanyahu) over the Arab-Israeli conflict and the Palestinian issue.

According to the former Supreme Commander of NATO forces and Secretary of State, the late General Alexander Haig: “Israel constitutes the largest US aircraft carrier, which does not require a single US boot on board, cannot be sunk, deployed in a most critical region to the US economy and national security. And, if there were not Israel in the eastern flank of the Mediterranean, the US would have to deploy – to the region – a few more real aircraft carriers and tens of thousands of troops, which would have cost the US taxpayer some $15 BN annually. All of which is spared by the existence of Israel.”

Israel has been the most cost-effective, battle-tested laboratory of the US defense industries; the most reliable and practical beachhead/outpost of the US defense forces; sharing with the US unique intelligence, battle experience and battle tactics.  Thus, Israel extends the US strategic hand, at a time when the US is experiencing draconian cuts in its defense budget, curtailing the size of its military force and the global deployment of troops, while facing tough international industrial-defense competition and dramatically intensified threats of Islamic terrorism overseas and on the US mainland.

For example, in 2016, Israel’s Air Force, which flies US-made aircraft shares with the US Air Force and the US manufacturers of the F-16, F-15 and additional US aircraft systems, real-time online, daily operational, maintenance and repair lessons, derived from Israel’s daily battle experience, which upgrades US national and homeland security, as well as enhances research and development, global competitiveness, exports and employment base of the US defense industries (e.g., Lockheed-Martin, McDonnell Douglas, Bell Helicopter, Boeing Defense, Northrop Grumman, etc.).

The plant manager of Fort Worth, Texas-based General Dynamics (Lockheed Martin), which manufactures the F-16, asserted that Israeli lessons have spared the manufacturer 10-20 years of research and development, leading to over 700 modifications in the current generation of the F-16, “valued at a mega-billion dollar bonanza to the manufacturer.”  One may conclude that St. Louis, Missouri-based McDonnel Douglas, the manufacturer of the F-15 benefits in the same manner.

Similar lessons have been shared with the US Army, Navy and Marine Corps and the US manufacturers of tanks, armed personnel carriers, missile launchers, missiles, night navigation systems and hundreds of additional military and homeland security systems, manufactured by the US and utilized by Israel. For instance, the Chattanooga, Tennessee-based Northrup Grumman plant, which manufactures explosive-neutralizing robots has increased its exports since Israel’s decision to employ its product, benefitting from weekly telephone conference calls with Israeli experts, who have shared with Northrup Grumman their operational lessons. Israel is to the US defense industry what a triple-A tenant is to a shopping mall – enhancing value and drawing clients.

According to General George Keegan, a former US Air Force Intelligence Chief, the value of intelligence shared by Israel with the US – exposing the air force capabilities of adversaries, their new military systems, electronics and jamming devices – “could not be procured with five CIAs…. The ability of the US Air Force in particular, and the Army in general, to defend whatever position it has in NATO, owes more to the Israeli intelligence input than it does to any other single source of intelligence, be it satellite reconnaissance, be it technology intercept, or what have you.”

A similar assessment was made by the late Senator Daniel Inouye, who was the Chairman of the Intelligence Committee and the Appropriations Committee: “Israel provides the US with more intelligence than all NATO countries combined.”  In July 2003, Brig. General Michael Vane, Deputy Chief of Staff at the US Army Training and Doctrine Command stated that Israel’s counter-terrorism experience shaped the US war on terrorism.

Moreover, US Special Operations units on their way to Iraq and Afghanistan are trained by Israeli experts in tackling suicide bombers, car bombs and the deadly Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). Upon arrival at the front, they are assisted by Israeli-developed (and co-developed with the US) unmanned aerial vehicles. Moreover, an Israeli armor plating technology, installed on U.S. military vehicles minimizes US fatalities, and the innovative “Israeli bandage” is employed to stop severe bleeding of injured US soldiers. US bomb squads leverage Israel’s unique counter-terrorism experience, improving their explosives neutralizing capabilities abroad and on the US mainland.

Israel has shared with the US its battle tactics and urban warfare experience, gained during wars against conventional Arab armies and Islamic/Palestinian terrorists.  In 2014, General (ret.) Chuck Krulak, former Commandant of the US Marine Corps, stated: “The US battle tactics formulation, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas – the intellectual Mecca of the US Army – is based on the Israeli book.”  In 1991, during the First Gulf War, General Krulak fought Russian tanks operated by Saddam Hussein, by applying the 1973 Israeli battle tactics against Soviet tanks employed by Egypt.

In November, 1952, following Israel’s 1948-49 War of Independence, General Omar Bradley, the US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, proposed to expand strategic cooperation with Israel, only to be rebuffed by the Department of State, which opposed the establishment of the Jewish State.

However, Israel has evolved into the most effective US strategic beachhead/outpost in the Middle East and beyond, as demonstrated during the 1967 Six-Day-War, when Israel obliterated the Egyptian military, aborting the pro-Soviet Egyptian attempt to topple the pro-US Arab oil-producing regimes, which would have devastated US economic and military interests at a time of high-dependency on Persian Gulf oil.  In 1969, Israel shared with the US its own flare system, which diverted anti-aircraft heat-seeking missiles away from their targets, saving the lives of many gunship pilots during the Vietnam War.

In 1970, Israel’s power projection forced a rollback of the Soviet-backed Syrian invasion of pro-US Jordan, which aimed at toppling the Hashemite regime, and then surging into Saudi Arabia, which would have triggered an anti-US geo-strategic avalanche.

Following Israel’s October 1973 War against the Soviet-armed Egypt and Syria, some 50 US military experts, headed by General Donn Starry, spent six months studying Israel’s battle experience and tactics and the captured Soviet military systems, producing eight thick volumes, which tilted the global balance of power in favor of the US, upgraded the US defense of Europe during the Cold War, enhanced the US air and land battle doctrines during the 1991 Gulf War, and improved the global competitiveness of the US defense industries.

In 1989, 1969 and 1966, Israel snatched a Soviet Mig-23, a most advanced P-12 Soviet early warning radar and ELINT (electronic signals intelligence) system, and a Soviet Mig-21 from Syria, Egypt and Iraq, respectively. All were transferred to the US, evaluated and integrated into the US battle tactics, counter-measures and the defense industrial competitive edge, tilting the global balance of power in favor of the US.

On July 4, 1976, Israel’s Entebbe hostage-rescue operation was a turning point in the battle against anti-US, pro-USSR Islamic terrorism.  In 1981, in defiance of the US Administration, Israel devastated Iraq’s nuclear reactor, sparing the US a nuclear confrontation against Iraq in 1991, and snatching the pro-US Saudis from the jaws of pro-Soviet Iraq.  In 1982, Israel destroyed twenty advanced Soviet surface-to-air missile (SAM) batteries, deployed in Lebanon/Syria and throughout the world, downing 89 Soviet Mig-21s, Mig-23s and Su-20s in the process. Israel proved that the most advanced mobile Soviet SAMs could be jammed, penetrated and destroyed, promptly sharing the battle tactics and electronic warfare innovations with the US Air Force and defense industrial base, providing the US with a significant geo-strategic and industrial game-changing edge over Moscow.  In 2007, Israel destroyed a Syrian-North Korean-Iranian nuclear plant, dealing a blow to global terrorism, sparing humanity the trauma of a nuclear Assad in 2016.

In March, 2007, General John Craddock, the Supreme Commander of NATO, told the House Armed Services: “In the Middle East, Israel is the closest ally of the US, consistently supporting our interests through security cooperation.” Even CNN – which is generally critical of Israel – agreed that Israel’s war against Hamas terrorists advanced homeland security in pro-US Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States.

A June 2015 strategic agreement intensified cooperation between the air forces of both countries, establishing twelve teams of officers and codifying a widening range of joint annual agendas: operations, battle tactics, training, maintenance, repairs, airborne medicine, flight safety, etc., in the face of mutual threats, joint interests and constrained budgets.  US combat pilots benefit uniquely during joint drills with their Israeli colleagues, who always fly in a “do-or-die” state of mind – a result of Israel’s narrow geographic waistline – which stretches the capabilities of the aircraft to new dimensions and generates more daring and innovative maneuvers, shared with their US colleagues. Recently, Israel’s Air Force developed a ground-breaking method of identifying, repairing and preempting cracks in old combat planes, such as the F-16, and promptly shared that information with the US Air Force and manufacturer. Instead of grounding planes for six months and preoccupying hundreds of mechanics, the Israeli-developed system requires two weeks and only a few mechanics, yielding significant economic and national security benefits.

In 2016, against the backdrop of mounting conventional and terrorist threats, the proliferation of Islamic terrorist cells in the US, the collapse of Europe’s military power projection, the Islamization of Turkey’s national security policy, the erosion of the Western posture of deterrence, and the growing instability, fragmentation, unpredictability and doubtful reliability of pro-US Arab regimes, Israel is the only stable, reliable, predictable, capable, democratic and unconditional ally of the US. Israel constitutes a critical obstacle to the megalomaniacal, Islamic imperialism, enhancing the national and homeland security of the US and its Arab allies. Unlike Europe, Israel is able and willing to flex its muscles.

An Israel-like ally in the Persian Gulf might have dramatically reduced the US military involvement in the Gulf and the Indian Ocean.

The raging, anti-US Arab Street, the melting UN-minded European Street, the commercially and militarily innovative pro-US Israeli Street, and the intensifying threats to global sanity and the US national and homeland security, all highlight Israel’s role as a special strategic partner of the USA – and not a member of the “foreign aid” club of supplicants – increasingly contributing to mutually-beneficial geo-strategic US-Israel joint ventures.

{Yoram will be in the US during May and September, 2016, available for speaking engagements (http://bit.ly/1W5CrSr)}

Yoram Ettinger

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/us-investment-in-not-foreign-aid-to-israel/2016/05/02/

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