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November 1, 2014 / 8 Heshvan, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘fra’

French Jewish Immigration to Israel Up 49 Percent

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

Jewish immigration from France to Israel has increased by 49 percent in the first nine months of 2013 compared to last year.

Through September, 2,185 French Jews have immigrated to Israel, compared to 1,469 immigrants during the same time frame in 2012, according to Jewish Agency for Israel figures. The number of immigrants who arrived from France to Israel during the whole of 2012 was 1,907.

On average, Jewish immigration to Israel from the rest of the world under the Law of Return showed an increase of 1 percent during the first nine months of 2013. In total, 13,905 people immigrated, or made aliyah, this year, according to the Jewish Agency.

But Jewish immigration from North America has dropped by 8 percent, to 2,524 new arrivals in 2013 from the 2,737 who came in January-September 2012.

September brought 148 French Jewish immigrants to Israel, compared to 90 who came in September 2012.

“September numbers are usually predictive of the total numbers for the year,” said Howard Flower, director of aliyah for the International Christian Embassy Jerusalem, a aliyah partner of the Jewish Agency.

Of the immigrants to Israel this year, 3,188 Jews arrived from Western Europe — a 26 percent increase from the same period last year.

On Nov. 8, the European Union’s Fundamental Rights Agency released results of a survey among 5,847 self-identified Jews from nine European countries in which approximately a third said they had considered emigrating in recent years because they did “not feel safe” living in their countries as Jews.

The figure for Jews contemplating emigration was particularly high in Hungary, France and Belgium, with 48, 46 and 40 percent respectively saying they had considered leaving.

Experts on the French Jewish community have said that many French Jews either have considered emigrating or emigrated for financial reasons since the 2008 financial crisis, as well as the increase in anti-Semitic violence since 2009 and after the second intifada in the early 2000s.

Hungary: Survey on Antisemitism in Europe Flawed

Saturday, November 16th, 2013

Hungarian officials questioned the methodology of a survey that showed greater fear of anti-Semitism among Jews in Hungary than in other European countries.

The head of the Hungarian delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, Gergely Prohle, raised “several questions with relation to methodology, strongly questioning its representative nature,” according to a Nov. 12 statement by the Hungarian Foreign Ministry.

The statement concerned a survey published Nov. 8 by the European Union’s Fundamental Rights Agency. Conducted online among 5,874 respondents who self-identified as Jews, it showed that Hungarian Jews were particularly worried about discrimination and that nearly half have considered emigrating.

In the statement, Prohle said the agency openly admitted to having methodology issues in its report. He quoted a statement from the report which reads: “This methodology is unable to deliver a random probability sample fulfilling the statistical criteria for representativeness,” and “the chosen survey mode is likely to have excluded some eligible members of the target population.”

In Hungary, where the anti-Semitic Jobbik party is third largest in parliament, 90 percent of 517 respondents said anti-Semitism was either a “fairly big problem” or a “very big problem.” The average rating for the statement in all countries surveyed was only 66 percent.

Hungary, which is believed to have 100,000 Jews, also led in the number of Jews who said they had considered emigrating because of anti-Semitism, with 48 percent of Hungarian respondents replying in the affirmative compared to 18 percent in Britain and a 29-percent average overall.

“The survey was negative about Hungary,” Ferenc Kumin, Hungary’s deputy state secretary for international communication, said at a Nov. 13 press conference with Prohle in Budapest.

At the conference, Prohle said the survey was conducted in Hungary in 2012 and failed to reflect possible changes following steps by the Hungarian government to combat anti-Semitism.

“Having reconsidered the seriousness of the situation, the Hungarian government has since brought several important decisions designed to monitor and combat anti-Semitic phenomena,” Prohle said.

In addition, legislation has been introduced to regulate and sanction football hooliganism and anti-Semitic political statements, he added.

But Jewish community leaders said the elevated fear reflected in the report matched what they knew about the community.

“Members of our community already for a long time are aware of the existence and of the increase of anti-Semitism in Hungary,” Gyorgy Gador, the head of the Pava synagogue community, told the Nepszabadsag daily last week. “Many [Jews] left in recent years abroad, not only for existential-economic reason, but because of their uncomfortable political feeling here, at home,” he added.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/hungary-survey-on-antisemitism-in-europe-flawed/2013/11/16/

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