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Posts Tagged ‘Golan Heights’

This Sunday Tell Kerry: We’re Keeping Samaria for the Wine

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Quality Israeli wines used to only come from the Golan Heights, an area reminiscent of Sonoma County, California. But as different regions of the country have been busy developing their own unique brands and tastes, it appears that a renaissance of sorts has been taking place in the largest wine growing region, the Shomron, or Samaria, where Israelite kings and prophets used to roam the earth and, very likely, sample the local wines.

It turns out that, in recent years, the Shomron has produced a disproportionate number of award winning wines from its relatively young vineyards and abundance of boutique wineries.

The foundation of the Shomron wine taste comes down to the high altitude, the humid and warm climate and the heavy and limey soil. Ah, and there’s the breeze, blowing in from the sea and gliding off the Carmel Mountains.

Frankly, there are probably some secular Israelis, alas, who couldn’t care less whether this sacred land would go into someone else’s hands or stay Jewish. But giving up this amazing wine country—same as in the Golan—would be unthinkable to many of them.

Now, whatever your political views, if you wish to find out for yourself what’s the big deal about Shomron wines – they’re coming to New York, this Sunday.

Shomron Wine Tasting in New York City

Sunday, November 17, come taste award-winning wines from Samaria.

A Wine Tasting Reception is planned for 6:30 PM, following Sunday’s Israel Advocacy Conference at the West Side Institutional Synagogue (the original location was the Edmond J. Safra Synagogue—it’s been changed).

West Side Institutional Synagogue

120 West 76th Street

(212) 877-7652

Many of the featured wines have only limited availability in the U.S., because of politics—the boycotts on products from the wrong side of the 1949 armistice border also known as the “green line.” So Sunday’s reception is sure to draw enthusiasts of both great wines and of Israel, eager to taste and assortment of wines that consistently score at 90 and above.

Featured producers include Arnon, Mount Blessing, Psagot, Shiloh and Tura wineries, which have together brought attention and acclaim to this region by winning multiple high-level awards in the Vinalies, Zarcillo, Terravino, and Eshkol Ha’zahav competitions.

You can register for the conference and the wine tasting here. The cost for the wine tasting event is $100 per person, for an offering of a large variety of bottles priced in the $40-80 range.

The suggested donation fee for attending the conference is $18.

Two Mortar Shells from Syria Explode at Golan Heights Border

Monday, October 21st, 2013

Two more mortar shells fired by either Syrian rebels or soldiers exploded at the Golan Heights border Monday. The IDF said the shells apparently were stray fire in clashes between the two sides. No one was injured and no damage was reported.

The Golan Heights frequently has been under fire the past several months, sometimes intentionally.

UPDATE: IDF Attacks Source of Mortar Fire from Syria

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

The IDF attacked the source of mortar fire on Israel Wednesday afternoon and injured Syrian soldiers after two shells exploded in the Golan Heights and lightly wounded two Israeli soldiers.

The retaliatory attack knocked out the mortar launcher on the Syrian side of the Golan, and military spokesmen that an unknown number of Syrian fighters apparently soldiers of the Assad regime, were injured.

It was the first time Israeli soldiers were wounded from fire on the Syrian side during the civil war, and it was at least the second time the IDF retaliated. Two months ago, the Israeli army fired a missile on Syrian territory after artillery fire on the Israeli side of the Golan.

One of the Israeli soldiers suffered shrapnel wounds and the other was treated for shock. Both were evacuated to the hospital in Tzfat (Safed).

It is not yet known whether the fire from the Syrian side was errant or intentional, but preliminary estimates were that the soldiers were hit by stray mortar shells.

It was only a matter of time until there were injuries to Israeli soldiers. Residents of the Golan and soldiers posted near the border have become accustomed to mortars shells and occasional machine gun fire the past several months as the civil war continues to rage on the other side of the border.

Heavy fighting was reported on Wednesday between Syrian rebels and soldiers loyal to the Assad regime.

Syria and Israel have maintained a ceasefire since 1974, one year after the Yom Kippur War. It has held despite a cold war between Israel and the Assad regime, but the civil war has raised the threat that either side might jump at an opportunity to try to draw Israel into the conflict.

U.N. troops posted in the demilitarized zone were forced to evacuate the area several times this year because of battles, and in at least two instances, U.N. soldiers were kidnapped or detained.

Syrian Clashes Rage Next to Golan Heights Border

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

Mortar shells from pro and anti-Assad forces landed next the border fence at the Golan Heights Tuesday morning, forcing Israelis to halt maintenance work and vacate the area.

Ten Syrian civilians crossed the border where there is no fence to take refuge, and the IDF so far has not sent them back.

IDF Tests Soldiers with Surprise Drill near Syrian Border

Monday, September 9th, 2013

The IDF staged a surprise drill Saturday night on Mount Hermon, and Nahal Brigade soldiers used live fire and took over a mock outpost near the border with Syria. The exercise had been planned, and the IDF said it was not necessarily connected to the current tension in the wake of a threatened American military attack on Syria.

Two battalions were involved in the exercise.

“We believe that we have to be prepared whenever when we have an opportunity” to train, said Lt. Col. Oshik Azulai. “Soldiers have an obligation to the country and to the IDF to be ready for war…with the enemy, and we have a lot of them,” he added.

The surprise drill was part of a three-month training period that will conclude in November with a major exercise, assuming the soldiers are not needed earlier for action on the Syrian or Lebanese front.

Israelis to Munch 15,000 Tons of Apples this Rosh Hashanah Season

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

The apple and honey tradition on Rosh Hashanah has Israelis consuming 15,000 tons of apples during the month of September, an increase of almost 50 percent  from average consumption during the rest of the year.

Israel’s crop of apples is of a particularly high quality this year, according to Amos Levin, general manager of the Galilee Development Corporation and chairman of the apple division of Israel’s Plants Production and Marketing Board.

“This summer’s relative cooler temperatures, especially at night, helped produce a higher quality of crop,” he said. Levin noted that this year’s crop, harvested from August through November, is excellent for size, color and taste.

Nearly all of Israel’s apples are grown in the hills of the Galilee and the Golan Heights because apples require cold winters and cooler summer nights to grow best.

The northern apple orchards are located on hills that are more than 2,000 feet higher and cover approximately 10,500 acres.

More than 100,000 tons of apples are sold in Israel each year, with the apple market valued at more than $200 million, serving as the core for the local economy in the Golan Heights. Another 7,000 tons of apples are imported into Israel from the United States and Europe.

While Israel exports little of its apples abroad, this year, the country exported 18,000 tons of apples grown by Druze farmers living in the Golan to Syria, in coordination with the Plants Production and Marketing Board, the IDF and the Red Cross. The Druze apple growers of the Golan have been selling to Syria has for the past eight year, but the apple exports were stopped in 2012 when the war situation became too volatile.

This year the apple industry also drew a number of university students from across Israel interested in learning more about agriculture and helping out Golan apple growers.

Sapir college student, Yotam Eyal told Tazpit News Agency that he and his friends have been picking apples for the past month.

“We are college students from all over Israel – from the Negev, Jerusalem, and the north, who are interested in learning more about agriculture and connecting to the land,” Eyal explained. “There are projects that have been initiated in the past year which get students involved in these areas.”

“It’s good to see where a fruit like an apple that you buy in the supermarket comes from,” commented Eyal. “Picking apples all day in the orchard is hard work. But it has made us appreciate dipping the apple in honey that much more this Rosh HaShanah.”

Explosion Wounds 4 Soldiers at Northern Border; IDF Mum

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

An explosion wounded four Israeli soldiers at the Lebanese border overnight, but the IDF is not releasing any information on the incident and whether it was an attack or a result of a maneuver. An IDF statement said the soldiers “were wounded last night by an explosion during operational activity in the north.”

The soldiers suffered “light to moderate” injuries, but a spokesman told the Jewish Press the military would not even divulge to which hospital they were evacuated.

The IDF also not say where the explosion occurred and refused to answer if it was in the Golan Heights or at the border near the area of Metulla, in the Upper Galilee, or to the west towards the Mediterranean Coast.

The border area, especially on the Golan Heights, has been subject to mortar and rifle fire from Syria,  sometimes aimed intentionally at Israel and sometimes fire from both sides in the Syrian civil war.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/explosion-wounds-4-soldiers-at-northern-border-idf-mum/2013/08/07/

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