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September 28, 2016 / 25 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Grandparents’

Police Harass Grandparents of the Minor from Yitzhar

Monday, July 4th, 2016

The bizarre saga of the minor from Yitzhar continues, this time with the police harassing the young boy’s elderly grandparents in Petach Tikva as well as others who helped the boy comply with the IDF’s administrative expulsion order, according to the Honenu legal aid society.

For reasons unknown, the IDF gave an administrative distancing order to a 15-year-old minor from Yitzhar, requiring that he leave his parents’ home and all of Judea and Samaria. They claim he is a danger to the state, but there’s been no trial, no evidence, and they only arrested the boy for not leaving his parents’ home as ordered and not for any criminal actions they imagine he’s done.

The family has been trying to fight the secretive order. The other week the police arrested the boy at 3 AM in his parents’ home and tried to send him to some unknown farm in the south of the country, apparently for reeducation.

The family fought it.

In part because the police couldn’t even provide basic details on the facility and they didn’t follow procedures and bring in child welfare services, the court decided to free the boy to return home. The court strongly criticized the police for their actions.

But the police immediately appealed to a different judge who threw the boy back in jail over Shabbat.

After Shabbat the first court released the boy again, but he could not return to Judea and Samaria, so he has been going to different homes each night to sleep, to comply with the anti-democratic distancing order.

The Petach Tikva Magistrate’s court is expected to make an interim decision on Tuesday, and until then, the expelled youth has been living part of the time with his grandparents, despite their protests to the court that it would be too difficult for them to take him in because of the police expectations from them.

And the police are making sure that it is very difficult on the grandparents.

The police decided to visit and harass the grandparents in the middle of the night, despite promising the court it wouldn’t do that.

This week the police began loudly banging on the grandparents’ door at 4 AM, screaming at the couple, demanding the elderly couple immediately open up the door so they could check if the minor was sleeping there.

When the elderly couple asked the police how they can show up at that hour and act that way, one policeman answered they can show up whenever they want.

Nor is this a one-time occurrence by the police.

At a different home the boy had stayed at previously in Givatayim, the police showed up at 11 PM with their walkie-talkies on at full volume. They began ringing the intercom of different neighbors, despite the family’s name being clearly posted on the intercom, and worse, despite knowing the boy wasn’t even there anymore, as he had informed the police he was sleeping at a different address that night.

The host family said the police woke up the entire street with their actions.

The boy’s former host asked, “Why are the police punishing them?” They were helping the family comply with the judge’s order.

Unfortunately, similar stories of police abuse are not unknown in Israel.

The family continues to protest, and other youths have begun protesting in front of the home of Central Command chief Ron Numa who signed the bizarre IDF expulsion order of the young boy from his home.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Rabbis Denied My Daughter a Jewish Education

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

Tomorrow I will be registering my 14-year-old daughter in public school. I never in my wildest dreams believed I would be doing something like this, but we have been left with no other option.

My oldest child, a son, graduated from the local all-boys yeshiva and my 17-year-old daughter recently graduated from the all-girls yeshiva high school. While both of them were never more than adequate students, and my daughter had her share of academic difficulties, they were able to complete their Jewish educations.

My 14-year-old daughter’s school career was much more difficult, especially when she transitioned from elementary school to middle school. She suffered from Attention Deficit Disorder, and though we tried almost every medication available, none of them seemed to work.

She received some support the first year of middle school, and more support the next, but after the first year her self-esteem suffered a severe blow and she ended the year anxious and depressed.

I tried to give her as much outside support as I could. I hoped the school would be supportive, and though the teachers were wonderful, the administrators made it clear they did not feel their school was the right place for her.

I hoped things would change, that the school would decide it would continue to support her and help her through, but that was not to be. I had sent my children to the same school for 17 years, but the school decided it was not worth the effort to educate my third child.

I turned to the local yeshiva day school for help. Though I had not opted to send my children there from the beginning, I thought the high school might be a better fit for my daughter. I worked at the school as an outside consultant and was intimately aware of the services the school offered and the level of student they were able to accommodate.

I took my daughter to visit the school, and after spending a day there she asked if she could go back. She felt comfortable in the classes, was treated kindly by the other students, and felt this was a place where she fit in.

Much to my dismay, however, the principal informed me that his school did not accept students who had been rejected by other schools. I had not heard of this policy and told him that if she could not go there she would most likely end up going to public high school. He agreed to consider her application, but after a few weeks I received yet another rejection.

My local rabbi, when informed of the situation, was very disturbed. He agreed to speak with the school’s principal, who in turn agreed to reconsider my daughter’s application. I gave them the numbers of the various individuals who work with my daughter, and allowed them full access to all her information. (These professionals later informed me they told school personnel they felt my daughter could be successful in a mainstream curriculum with support.)

After several weeks I received a phone call from the principal, who once again told me my daughter would not be able to attend his school as he felt the school could not accommodate her needs. I respectfully disagreed with him, telling him I was fully aware of my daughter’s cognitive and emotional issues but I also knew very well the services the school provided. I told him I felt the school could, in fact, accommodate her needs. And I told him once again that if he would not accept her, she would have to attend public school. His answer was still no.

I tried other schools farther outside my local area but still within busing distance. One school was not dismissive and truly appeared to care about the welfare of my daughter; their program, however, was full and there was a waiting list. I tried two other schools outside my area but neither one seemed interested in trying to help us, citing the by now familiar reasoning that my daughter would not be successful there.

Our only other option would have been to send her out of town, but she did not want to leave her home and her parents to go to school, and I did not feel that forcing her to do so would be in her best interests.

When I was a child, I lived with my grandparents and attended the local public school. I don’t remember every detail or how it all took place, but I know that a group of local rabbis contacted my grandparents and had them enroll me in a Talmud Torah, an after-school Jewish learning program.

After a few months in the program, the rabbis again contacted my grandparents. They told them that a Jewish girl belonged in yeshiva, not public school. When my grandparents, who lived on a fixed income, told them the cost made it prohibitive, the rabbis told them it would all be taken care of.

From third grade on, I attended yeshiva and graduated from a yeshiva high school, all because a few rabbis cared enough to make sure a Jewish child was able to receive a Jewish education.

I wish I knew where those kindly rabbis are today, so I could thank them. I am sure I would not be the person I am now, with the Jewish values I have, if it was not for the fact that they cared. I am also sure they would be astonished at the behavior of the rabbis who are denying my daughter a Jewish education.

Now that we’re in the month of Elul, perhaps the rabbis who have caused us so much distress should take notice, think about their actions and the consequences of those actions, and pray for forgiveness.

I hope God will be watching over my daughter as she begins her high school career in an environment that is foreign to everything she has been taught and exposed to thus far, with no Jewish atmosphere, no Jewish learning, no Yiddishkeit.

I will be praying that her Jewish identity and her Jewish soul remain intact.

Michelle Gross

For These We Weep

Monday, July 29th, 2013

I have been searching for the answer to this question…who did they kill…those 104 we are about to release? I know of a mother and her three children; I know of a grandfather stabbed in the back. I don’t know all the names but it is for these we weep today – once killed by Palestinian terrorists, today betrayed again by the government and the justice system in Israel.

Today, for these we weep…knowing that tomorrow…there will be…there will be…others.I got this on Facebook with the following note:

Look Into These Eyes….Men, Women, Parents, Grandparents, Children, Grandchildren, Infants, Soldiers, Asheknazi, Sefardic, Jews and Non Jews, Religious and Secular.

These precious faces haven’t smiled since vicious murderers stabbed, shot, kidnapped and murdered them. The Government has just agreed to release the spineless animals who murdered the people you are looking at. The Israeli Government did this as a prerequisite to have the ‘privilege’ to sit and discuss ‘peace’ with a people who continues to call for our destruction.

Who could demand such an insane request from us? I don’t forget all the good America has done for me and my people, but today… today is a brand new day. Yesterday doesn’t exist and tomorrow isn’t here yet. Today I live in a country that feels humiliated, confused and betrayed.

Look into their eyes… and imagine the agony of those who love them still and forever…

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Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Paula Stern

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/a-soldiers-mother/for-these-we-weep/2013/07/29/

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