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August 27, 2016 / 23 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘hacker’

US, Israel to Sign Super-Speed Cyber Info Sharing Deal

Monday, June 20th, 2016

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas is set to sign an agreement Tuesday on behalf of Washington with Israel to automate the sharing of cyber data between the two nations.

Mayorkas made the announcement Monday at a cyber conference at Tel Aviv University during an appearance with the head of the university’s cyber department, IDF Maj.Gen. (res.) Isaac Ben-Israel.

The new agreement will upgrade the speed of information sharing and help allies avoid hacker attacks with timely data at a time when cyber terror attacks threaten government resources, the two men said.

“The data about the attacks is on our computers,” Ben-Israel told The Jerusalem Post in an interview during the conference, “but sometimes we see it too late.” The problem of hackers rapidly replicating data is one that has programmers working hard to develop new defenses against cyber terror attacks.

Israel is engaged in developing new technologies that he said were, among other things, “using a much larger data set,” which could help to “defend against the next threat.”

Hana Levi Julian

Major Internet Firms Join ADL, European Jewish Groups to Battle Hate Speech Online

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

European Jewish students are teaming with the New York-based Anti-Defamation League to expand the organization’s Cyber-Safety Action Guide for European Internet users.

The European Jewish Congress and European Union of Jewish Students will work together to help expand the guide, and develop translations in French and German.

The news follows an agreement between the European Commission and Google, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft on creation of a “Code of Conduct” addressing online hate speech.

ADL CEO Jonathan A. Greenblatt said in a statement that the Code of Conduct “closely tracks ADL’s ‘Best Practices for Responding to Cyberhate” originally released in 2014.’”

The Cyber-Safety Action Guide includes tabs where visitors may access information on submitting complaints and reporting hate speech to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

It also provides quick links to each company’s cyber-bullying and harassment policies and terms of service, as well as links directly to online complaint forms. The guide is currently available in English and in Spanish.

Hana Levi Julian

Islamic Jihad Terrorist is Alleged ‘SuperHacker’ Into Israeli Aerial Systems

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

An operative with the Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ) terrorist organization has been indicted on a host of charges relating to his ability to hack into military and civilian computer systems.

Known as the “computer administrator” of the PIJ, the suspect was recruited by the terrorist group in 2001 while working as a radio broadcaster. According to a statement released Wednesday by the Shin Bet domestic intelligence agency, the alleged hacker was indicted on charges of “espionage, conspiracy to pass information to an enemy, hacking computer material, and more.”

The suspect also holds the position of chairman in the “Palestinian Talent Society.” He was arrested February 23 while traveling to meet with young candidates from the Palestinian Authority for a television vocalist competition.

He allegedly managed to hack into IDF drones flying over Gaza, according to the charges filed in the indictment. He also allegedly succeeded in accessing the data on unmanned aerial vehicles flown by the IDF over the region. In addition, the hacker allegedly gave the data and footage produced by the cameras on the drones to his handlers.

Moreover, the hacker was allegedly able to access footage from highway cameras inside Israel. Through his ability to access information, the terrorist was able to obtain data on deployment of Israeli security forces and civilian personnel during rocket strikes and wars in Gaza, according to the indictment.

The suspect also allegedly developed an application that compiled data on movement of aircraft at Ben Gurion International Airport. The application is said to have provided data on passenger lists, plane types and weights, and arrival and departures times.

Hana Levi Julian

Cyber Attack Strikes More US Govt Offices , 4 Million Affected

Friday, June 5th, 2015

Do you or any of your family work for the federal government? If so, prepare to change all of your computer passwords and consider doing the same at your bank.

At least four million current and former civil service workers have had their privacy violated by hackers who breached computer systems at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the Department of the Interior.

According to a report in The Washington Post, the attack was carried out by Chinese hackers, as have previous U.S. industrial breaches.

OPM notified those whose “personally identifiable information” may have been compromised, offering 18 months of credit monitoring for those who were affected.

OPM Director Katherine Archuleta told journalists at a news conference the government is working on trying to improve its cyber security. “We take very seriously our responsibility to secure the information stored in our systems,” she said.

The breach was first detected in late April and confirmed in early May. It is unclear when the attack began.

It is the Department of Homeland Security that is tasked with cyber defense. DHS officials said they were working with the FBI to get to the bottom of who was behind the current attack.

“DHS is continuing to monitor federal networks for any suspicious activity and is working aggressively with the affected agencies to conduct investigative analyses to assess the extent of this alleged intrusion,” DHS spokesperson Sy Lee said.

Congressman Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said “The cyber threat from hackers, criminals, terrorists and state actors is one of the greatest challenges we face on a daily basis, and it’s clear that a substantial improvement in our cyber databases and defenses is perilously overdue.”

Hana Levi Julian

Russian Hackers Break Into Pentagon Computer Network

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

Russian hackers allegedly broke into one of the computer networks of the Pentagon, according to a report broadcast Thursday on Fox News.

Cyber centers that guard unclassified networks reportedly detected the Pentagon security breach and kicked the hackers off “in a way that minimized their chances of returning,” according to the report. The breach apparently took place earlier this year, Defense Secretary Ash Carter told a group at Stanford University.

It’s not the first time the Russian government has been caught with its cyber snoops poking around in American networks.

Russian hackers broke into the unclassified networks of the White House itself last October. This past March, media revealed the networks at the State Department had also been breached.

There have also been numerous cases of Chinese government-backed hackers stealing technical data about the U.S. military’s newest war plane, the F-35, in addition to industrial cyber attacks by North Korea.

The Pentagon has also announced plans to launch its own cyber warfare division. It’s the first open admission by the Pentagon that the U.S. military intends to wage war via the Internet as well as through traditional means.

Thousands of hackers routinely attempt to attack Israeli networks hundreds of times a day. Jewish Press.com was recently the target of one such attempt, in fact, but fortunately the hackers managed to get themselves kicked off the site while trying to attack it.

Recognizing the growing threat several years ago, Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu ordered the creation of an entire government division and one in the military devoted to the development of cyber defense, intelligence and warfare.

Hana Levi Julian

Hackers Reportedly Infiltrate IDF Computer Network

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

Hackers reportedly penetrated a computer network associated with the IDF, according to a Reuters report.

The company who discovered the hacking, Blue Coat, did not disclose which network they claim was hacked, and they do not know if sensitive data was stolen.

Similar to the attack used against JewishPress.com last week, the hackers used easily downloadable, but sophisticated, hacking tools to do the job, rather than requiring any in-house technical knowledge.

In the case of the IDF, the hackers also used social engineering, or in plain language, tricking the users, to help them gain access.

The hackers sent emails to soldiers which some opened, with Trojan horse software embedded inside. Once opened the software embedded itself into the network and began sending out a beacon that it was inside.

The IDF said, according to the report, that they are not familiar with any successful hacking attempts on IDF operational networks.

Arab, Arab affiliated and anti-semitic hackers regularly target Jewish and Israeli websites in their cyber-warfare campaigns.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Plot Thickens in Sony Pictures North Korea Hack Attack Saga

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

The plot appears to be thickening in the Sony-North Korea hack attack saga.

A cascade of events has followed the FBI’s accusation that North Korea is behind the attacks – and threats – aimed at preventing Sony Entertainment Pictures from releasing its comedy film, ‘The Interview.’

North Korea now seems to be experiencing widespread Internet outages. An expert quoted by Associated Press said late Monday the country’s online access was “completely down.”

National Security Council spokesperson Bernadette Meehan said, “We have no new information to share regarding North Korea today. If in fact North Korea’s Internet has gone down, we’d refer you to that government for comment.”

The White House also had no comment. Referring to U.S. government responses to recent threats from North Korea, State Department spokesperson Marie Harf told reporters enigmatically, “Some will be seen, some may not be seen.”

On Friday, a government official quoted by The New York Times said the U.S. would ask China to block North Korea’s Internet access as a means of dealing with the threats emanating from Pyongyang.

“What we are looking for is a blocking action, something that would cripple their efforts to carry out attacks,” the official said. According to the report, virtually all of North Korea’s telecommunications run through Chinese-operated networks.

China has already condemned the movie, calling it an act of “senseless cultural arrogance.”

It is also hard to gauge China’s reaction to any U.S. request to rein in North Korea, given that five hackers working for the Chinese military were indicted by the Justice Department in May. They were charged with stealing sensitive information from U.S. companies.

Nevertheless, North Korean Internet accessibility appears to be down, at least for now.

Meanwhile, a hacker that might be associated with the well-known Anonymous hacker collective claimed on Twitter from an account that was suspended over the weekend, @TheAnonMessage, that i t would release the movie, “The Interview” this Thursday over the Internet anyway – just as a “Christmas present” to web surfers.

“We’re not with either side, we just want to watch the movie too… Banning movies only because North Korea’s dictator disapproves. What’s next, @RedDawnFilm?”

The sneers came in response to the latest nasty message sent to the FBI from the Guardians of Peace (GOP) hacker group, believed to be a front for North Korea.

(Yes I know it’s hard to keep all these threads straight – it may help to think of it as a war between the Crips and the Bloods.)

“Praising” the FBI for its investigation, the GOP hacker group sent a link to a video which repeats !”“You are an idiot,” over and over in animated lettering.

Enter Anonymous.

A message to Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton from that group was posted on the ‘Pastebin’ site (where GOP has been posting) this past Friday. This time Sony is being exhorted to “release The Interview as planned” or Anonymous will “carry out as many hacks” as possible to Lynton and Sony Entertainment.

Neither threat can be verified; they were both posted on the Pastebin website in plain text, and could have been written by anyone. Neither is traceable.

But as the Mashable website points out, members of the LulzSec hackers affiliated with Anonymous were convicted for involvement in a 2011 hack attack on Sony Pictures.

The current saga actually began in June when North Korea demanded the White House intervene with Sony and squelch production of The Interview, a comedy about assassinating North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un. It was scheduled for release this Thursday, December 25.

When the U.S. government did not stop producers, and the movie was completed, a massive hack attack was carried out against Sony. Emails containing information from company executives and employees plus other corporate data was released to the public along with a warning not to screen the movie, “The Interview” in any theater.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/plot-thickens-in-sony-pictures-north-korea-hack-attack-saga/2014/12/23/

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