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April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Hakan Fidan’

US Cancels Drone Contract With Turkey

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Everyone can try to pretend that relations between Israel and Turkey, and even between the United States and Turkey, are just as warm and fuzzy as they have been in the recent (recent for the U.S. is more recent than for Israel) past.

But once the U.S. starts packing up its toys and refusing to share (or sell) them with a former playmate – Turkey – there is no denying the rift.

The toys the U.S. will not be sharing with Turkey include 10 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), also known as Predator drones.

The reason for the rupture?

Most reports point to the the Turkish intelligence chief Hakan Fidan having disclosed to Iran the identities of 10 Iranians collecting information for the Mossad. But others see a deeper problem than one that just involves Israel. These theorists point to a more generalized problem of Turkey and Iran becoming closer collaborators, a dramatic about-turn given Turkey’s relentless campaign to unseat Syria’s president Bashar al-Assad, Iran’s primary puppet regime.

Yet another theory for the U.S. – Turkey rift – this one advanced by a Pakistani defense site – suggests that the drone contract cancellation was in response to Turkey’s rejection of bids from U.S. and other firms in favor of a Chinese defense firm for a $4 long-range air and missile defense system.  The Chinese firm which won that contract is sanctioned by the U.S.

Can NATO Member Turkey Ever Be Trusted Again?

Monday, October 21st, 2013

The Jewish Press has had the dubious honor of pointing the finger at Turkey’s chief intelligence officer Hakan Fidan and state flatly that his betrayal of 10 Mossad agents was the stuff that should get him something nice in his car in the morning. Yes, we don’t go for nice over here, but, as you’ll see, the rest of the world is coming around rather quickly to our position, and so, if I’m Hakan Fidan, I’d get me a bus pass.

An Eli Lake article in the Daily Beast has confirmations from U.S. officials of the David Ignatius initial Washington Post report. A CIA officer compared the loss to the betrayal of the Cambridge Five the network of Soviet moles (including the notorious Kim Philby), who provided invaluable intelligence to Moscow during the Cold War.

Danny Yatom, a former chief of Israel’s Mossad, told the Beast: “The fact those ten spies were burned by the Turks by purposely informing the Iranians is not only a despicable act, it is an act that brings the Turkish intelligence organization to a position where I assume no one will ever trust it again.”

Yatom said the Mossad has traditionally informed its Turkish counterparts about meetings with its spies on Turkish soil. He said if Turkey gave Iran any details about these meetings, it would compromise Israel’s intelligence operations against Iran.

Indeed, in April, 2012, the Tehran Times announced: “Iran has foiled Israeli terrorist plots.”

The Iranian Intelligence Ministry issued a statement on Tuesday announcing that it recently foiled several Israeli terrorist plots.

The statement was issued to provide more details about recent operations by Iranian intelligence forces that led to the arrest of 15 Mossad-linked spies and terrorists.

On April 10 [2012], the Intelligence Ministry announced that key members of an Israeli terrorist network had been identified and arrested in Iran.

Presumably, the blood of those 15 agents is on Hakan Fidan’s hands.

Omri Ceren, of The Israel Project, wrote today: “Turkey’s Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said that if the story is true, then Turkey’s intel chief Hakan Fidan was just ‘doing his job’ by ‘not letting other intelligence agencies operate in Turkey.’ That might be surprising to Turkey’s NATO allies, not to mention any country that does counterterror work with Ankara.”

And that is a problem well beyond the anger and betrayal anyone in the Mossad might be feeling today. Turkey has the largest army of all the European NATO members and it plays a central role in the alliance. Which means that if you’re a senior security official in any of NATO’s member countries, you’ll start reviewing your exchanges with the Turks. Remember, Turkey serves as a passageway not only for spies going into Iran, but also for terrorists coming out of Iran. If you can’t now trust the Turks to monitor that traffic reliably; if, in fact, you have to worry about them actually aiding and abetting those terrorists – what do you do?

This is far from being an Israel-only problem. I mentioned in an earlier article the similarity between Hakan Fidan’s despicable act and those Afghan soldiers who shoot their American fellows on patrol. If Turkey does not find a meaningful way of convincing its NATO allies that it is trustworthy—it could bring on a sea change in Turkey’s already eroding relationship with the West.

Is Erdoğan’s Turkey turning its back on its European aspirations, in search of a safe and familiar role as the Muslim world’s eternal second fiddle?

My Sincere Apologies to the Turkish Nation, Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

So, it appears that yours truly has gotten an entire country angry at him and that, as we speak, the Turkish high command, along with something they call “MIT” (it stands for Milli Istihbarat Teskilati, or National Intelligence Organization – nothing to do with brainy guys in Boston figuring out the universe) are up in arms over the threat I’ve been posing to Turkey’s national security. Well, kiss that trip to Istanbul good bye. I saw “Midnight Express,” I know the drill.

I’m a little excited, to be honest, I’ve never had a brawl with a country before. For the most part I fight with Jewish crazies who hate Muslims pathologically, with Reform Jews who insist anyone with a checkbook is a Jew, with the Women of the Wall who must have their piece of the rock, with a president who took my money and gave it to my banker – but never with an entire country. It’s strangely exhilarating, I have to say.

It all began about a week ago, with a story that was published in the Washington Post, the gist of which was that one Hakan Fidan, the head of the Turkish MIT, had knowledge of Israeli agents operating in Iran and, guess what, he turned over a list with ten of their names to the Iranians.

Considering the fact that no reputable refutation has been made available so far, and that the Israelis have not denied the story (since they were probably the ones who gave it to the Post in the first place), what Hakan Fidan did was bloody treacherous.

Indeed, last Friday the Turks stopped the denial campaign, which was coupled with accusations against Israel (naturally) and came around to admitting—in a roundabout way—that he probably had done it.

Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu told the Turkish Hurriyet: “When you read these articles, Hakan Fidan is accused of … not letting other intelligence agencies operate in Turkey. Therefore, he is being blamed for doing his job.”

Yet another good man being hunted down for his loyalty to his country and his faith.

Except that what Hakan Fidan has done was usurp a relationship that began in the 1950s between Israel’s and Turkey’s secret services, taking information he received as Israel’s ally and handing it over for execution to Israel’s worst enemies. Now, there’s a man doing his job and being blamed for it. What a victim.

And, according to The Wall Street Journal, Hakan Fidan was behind the arming of Muslim Brotherhood groups fighting in Syria. That’s one shade away from arming Al Qaeda. Also, the WSJ cited senior U.S. officials who said Fidan gave Iran sensitive intelligence collected by the U.S. and Israel.

A true friend, just doing his job. Lay off our Man Fidan, for he represents the highest values cherished by Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Turkey: love of country, love of the downtrodden and the Jews done it.

Now, none of the above stories of betrayal and murder-facilitation were anything I, personally, have gathered. I merely reported on the initial Washington Post expose regarding the folks Fidan most assuredly sent to their deaths. But if you google Hakan Fidan, both in regular and news flavors, you’ll get my Jewish Press story well above anything else in the world, including his Wikipedia profile and the original Washington Post column.

All of Turkey reads my article first, before they read anything else on the subject. I’ve been getting Turkish followers on my Twitter account, and Turks have been leaving hundreds of really angry comments on our Facebook page, comments we labor to remove every hour, because they’re not pleasant to read.

That’s because of a nasty note I, in the heat of opining, entered in the flow of my story: “If anyone deserves to find a special surprise in his car one morning, it’s Fidan, the Turkish spy chief.” You’ll have to admit, it’s not exactly a call to arms, it’s an expression of rage at what appears to be a lowlife reminiscent of those Afghani trainees who murder their American patrol fellows, or those Palestinian “security” folks who turned and shot their IDF patrol partners.

Surprisingly, the Turks are not angry at their own security chief for betraying the trust of a close ally—make that two close allies. They’re upset at me, for saying he deserves to be punished. I suppose some of it gets lost in translation. I also think the Turks, like those Muslims who kill people on account of their Muhammad cartoons (you don’t see Bugs Bunny worshipers doing that, now, do you?), should go shopping for a thicker skin. Seriously.

In any event, I am now a major star in Turkey, most likely because of the magical combination “Jewish Press,” which must be the final proof some Turks needed to the fact that whatever blood curdling fantasies they had harbored about Jews was totally true – look at the facts, this Yori Yanover said so, in the “Jewish Press” — that must be the communications organ for all the Jews.

Let’s face it, antisemites truly believe there’s a powerful Jewish cabal out there, and that if one of us Jews gives the word, immediately those trained, clandestine teams everyone knows so much about take off to carry it out. We can argue it ain’t so until we’re blue in the face, it won’t change their minds. Like I told you, they have the convictions of their deep seated antisemitism.

And so, instead of arguing, I will be the big man here, and announce officially that whatever surprises I may have been plotting for Hakan Fidan are now null and void. I order the Mossad to call the hit teams back; likewise the U.S. Seals which we Jews control with Rothchild’s gold must return to base. There will be no surprises for the Turkish spy chief as long as I’m running this cabal.

And tell David Duke his shorts are ready at the cleaner’s, we gave him the special gentile rate but he mustn’t forget the ticket. No tickie…

Great, now I went and started a war with the KKK and China, too.

Turkey Exposed 10 Israeli Agents in Iran

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan revealed to Iranian intelligence the identities of as many as 10 Iranians who had been meeting with their Mossad case officers in Turkey, The Washington Post’s David Ignatius reported Thursday.

The move was described by “knowledgeable sources” as causing a “significant” loss of intelligence and “an effort to slap the Israelis.” A Turkish Embassy spokesman had no comment.

Ignatius thinks this was the reason Netanyahu was waiting for so long to apologize to Turkey for the 2010 Gaza flotilla fiasco – he was furious. For more than a year, Bibi had resisted appeals from Obama and then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to say I’m sorry to the Turks and bring the feud to an end.

But regardless of the apology, there’s no love lost between Erdogan and Israel. In fact, Israeli intelligence sources have no doubt that Turkish intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, is basically an Iranian agent. They’ve described Fidan to CIA officials as “the MOIS (Iran’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security) station chief in Ankara.”

Nevertheless, the United States is still dealing with Fidan on sensitive matters, Ignatius reports. U.S. officials were so sorry to see ten good men die as a result of Erdogan’s treachery, but they didn’t protest to Turkish officials. Turkish-American relations continued warming last year, writes Ignatius, to the point that Erdogan was among Obama’s key confidants.

The practice of separating intelligence issues from policy issues is supposedly a long-standing U.S. approach. We keep our friends far and our enemies up close. It all makes sense when you think global.

Israeli intelligence had apparently run part of its Iranian spy network through Turkey, Ignatius speculates, saying Turkey has relatively easy movement back and forth across its border with Iran. The Turkish intelligence service, the Milli Istihbarat Teskilati, or MIT, was probably monitoring Israeli-Iranian covert meetings.

The Mossad is probably to blame here, say the Americans, who believe that after more than 50 years of cooperation with Turkey, the Mossad simply couldn’t imagine the Turks would “shop” Israeli agents to a hostile power. So, it turns out the Mossad can also be naïve.

If anyone deserves to find a special surprise in his car one morning, it’s Fidan, the Turkish spy chief. He is a key Erdogan man, who was handed him the MIT in 2010, after serving as a noncommissioned officer in the Turkish army and getting a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland and a doctorate in Ankara. After Fidan took over the Turkish service, “he rattled Turkey’s allies by allegedly passing to Iran sensitive intelligence collected by the U.S. and Israel,” according to a profile in the Wall Street Journal. The WSJ also mentioned that Fidan was arming jihadist rebels in Syria.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/turkey-exposed-10-israeli-agents-in-iran/2013/10/17/

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