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October 21, 2016 / 19 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘hatikva’

You Never Thought You Would See this in the UN

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Video of the Day

Pres. Rivlin Understands Arab Students’ Dilemma on National Symbols, Anthem: ‘Must Be Addressed’

Monday, May 30th, 2016

President Reuven Rivlin is seeking a way to find the “shvil hazahav” – the golden mean – wherein everyone can find something to agree upon in Israel’s national symbols and anthem.

On Sunday, Rivlin acknowledged that the national anthem, ‘HaTikva,” stirs the hearts of the nations Jews but as such does not do the same for those in the country who were not born Jewish — and this issue must be addressed.

The president acknowledged while speaking with Jewish and Arab students at Jerusalem’s Himmelfarb High School that one “can’t expect loyal Israeli citizens who are not Jewish to say that they have ‘a Jewish spirit yearning deep in the heart’ (quoting from the lyrics on the anthem) because they are not Jews. Maybe their spirit is yearning for their country, but not as part of the Jewish People because they are not part of the Jewish People,” he acknowledged. But the dilemma is not one that is easily remedied, Rivlin said.

Rivlin made the remark in response to a question by an Arab student who asked if it was possible to change or add anything to the symbols of the state, so that Arab citizens can identify with it, and feel a part of the country.

The president deferred to Education Minister Naftali Bennett, who had accompanied him to the school along with Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat. “This dilemma must be solved by Israeli leaders, one of whom is sitting right next to me,” he said. “The question you are asking needs to be on the national agenda in the next generation or two. This is a dilemma we cannot ignore. It needs to be addressed by leaders, by members of Knesset who were chosen by the people,” Rivlin said.

“At this point, where we have to base the existence of the State of Israel on a Jewish State, and a democratic one, we have to hold on to and strengthen the Zionist dream which comes with and often causes friction with those citizens who are not Zionist,” he went on.

“I await the day that every Israeli citizen can identify with the State of Israel and not just the deep, important idea of the 2,000-year-old quest of the Jewish people to return to their homeland.”

Hana Levi Julian

Boy Arrested for Singing “HaTikva” on Temple Mount

Monday, February 8th, 2016

While Arab MKs and Arab Supreme Court Justices absolutely refuse to sing the HaTikva, Israel’s national anthem, a young Jewish boy was arrested today for daring to sing it on the Temple Mount during his visit to the Jewish Holy site, according to a TPS report.

He’ll will have a court hearing on Tuesday in Jerusalem, and is being represented by a lawyer for Honenu.

Will the boy dare sing HaTikva in the courtroom?

Read more.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Yom HaZikaron at the Gush Etzion Cemetery

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

More than an hour before the Yom HaZikaron ceremony was to begin at 11:00 a.m. in Kfar Etzion at the Gush Etzion Regional Cemetery this morning, hundreds of school children lined the streets, streaming towards the event.

Police and security personnel were stationed on the approach road, directing the cars and buses to park in such a fashion that there would be order going in, and an orderly departure.


The cemetery lies in a rolling series of hills, with various communities represented in plateaued graveyards, with gravel in between and lots of lush greenery and wildflowers sprouting in all the open spaces


Just recently a building was put up, until then, every memorial service and every funeral took place in the open. Israeli funerals, unlike those elsewhere, can take place any time of day or night, and they generally take place within just a few hours of death.

But for today’s Yom HaZikaron ceremony, all those in the Gush Etzion area touched by loss showed up, and here in Israel, that is almost everyone. Some family members were lost to illness, others simply to old age. But in this cemetery, as in so many cemeteries in Israel, there is a disproportionate number of graves of young people – those who fell in all the wars Israel has endured, and those who were murdered by terrorists.


For more than an hour people were milling around, visiting the various graves, placing stones of remembrance, saying tehillim.

And when the hour drew near 11:00 a.m., the small area near the speakers’ platform filled beyond overflowing. There were many dozens of soldiers in uniform, closely-cropped young men and young women with impossibly thick curls, most soldiers wearing their units’ berets, others with their berets neatly folded and pinned to their shirts.


When the sirens rang out at the stroke of 11:00, four jets in formation took off from nearby: “they’re buzzing the entire country,” a woman said, “it will take about a minute.”

And then the speeches – is it fair to call them that? The messages invoking the memories, the love, the devotion to those who had given their lives for the Jewish State, washed quickly over the crowd, interspersed with a few haunting songs including “Ani Ma’amin” (“I Believe”) and Hatikvah. Two boys from a nearby high school spoke about the loss of two graduates of the school who were killed during last summer’s war.

Israeli crying at Yom HaZikaron Ceremony at Gush Etzion Regional Cemetery, April 22, 2015.

Several speakers mentioned the abduction and murder of the three teenagers which touched off last summer’s war. Eyal Ifrach, Gilad Sa’ar and Naftali Frenkel were kidnapped just down the road from where the ceremony took place.

A chazan sang out the names of all the soldiers and the victims of terror who are buried in this cemetery, as pain crossed the faces of so many who stood listening.

A representative of the Israel Defense Forces spoke, as did two representatives of the Knesset. One, MK Ze’ev Elkin, reminded those in the audience that David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s first president, famously recognized Gush Etzion as the savior of Jerusalem.

MK Zeev Elkin at Yom HaZikaron Ceremony at Gush Etzion Regional Cemetery. April 22, 2015.

MK Zeev Elkin at Yom HaZikaron Ceremony at Gush Etzion Regional Cemetery. April 22, 2015.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Why We are Here: Israel at 66

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Jews all over the world celebrate Israel’s Independence Day – even those who have no intention of ever

coming on ‘aliya’, and many of whom have never even visited Israel. “It’s a kind of insurance policy” one

overseas friend told me. “By supporting Israel financially and emotionally, I know that its sanctuary is

available to me or my children or grandchildren should the need ever arise.”

I find this kind of thinking very sad, because Israel is so much more than a refuge for persecuted Jews.

Not every immigrant who has built a life here was escaping from the horror of the Holocaust, the tyranny behind the Iron Curtain or the cruelty of life in an Arab country.

Many of us (the ones Israelis refer to as “Anglo-

Saxim) lowered their standard of living significantly when they settled in Israel,

yet found something here that

enhanced their quality of life

even as they struggled with inflation, mortgages and trying to make miniscule

salaries stretch to the end of the month.

We found here a family – our own people.

Of course, just like any family, we fight … about religion, politics,

,the settlements – the fights can be very bitter.

Yet at bottom we care about each other and bond together when

we face a common enemy.

We celebrate together and sometimes even have to grieve together.

Basically,when the going gets rough, we are on the same side.

We express our identity as Jews in different ways, but it is

the same identity.

We found here a beautiful country,

unique in the variety of its scenery and climate.

Meditteranean beaches banded by azure and indigo water

and pure white sand; coral reefs; dense forests; wooded mountains;

deserts and rivers and waterfalls; the shimmering mirrored glass of the Dead Sea;

fields carpeted with wildflowers –

and Jerusalem, the priceless jewel.

Some of us found here a spirituality that we’d never been able to achieve abroad.

Anyone who has been in Israel on Yom Kippur

when the whole country comes to a standstill for one day,

cannot doubt the “kedusha,”the holiness of Eretz Israel.

It is intangible, yet it is an undeniable presence.

We found here a pride in the remarkable achievements of this tiny country.

We can match, and surpass,

the high-tech of much bigger, richer and better developed nations.

We teach agriculture to the world.

Many of our scientists have won the Nobel Prize.

When any new Israeli invention captures the world’s imagination,

somehow we all bask in the reflected glory.

Israelis have always been compared to the Sabra –

the cactus with the thorny exterior but the soft heart.

We celebrate Yom HaTzma’ut in many ways –

campfires and singing, picnics, a Bible Quiz,

concerts, music and dancing in the streets.

We spend the day with family and friends and relish every moment of it.

But it is more than just enjoyment.

On every building, the Israeli flag flies.

Almost every balcony in every city flies

the white flag with the blue Magen David, the Shield of David.

And for days beforehand and a week afterwards,

the Israeli flag flies from every car on the road.

Every ceremony opens with the singing of

“HaTikva” – the Hope – Israel’s national anthem.

We sing it standing straight and proud,

and usually with tears

in our eyes

as we remember the broken people who found a safe haven here,

and those who never managed to

reach its shores and died with the dream of Zion in their hearts.

And we also remember the brave men and

women who gave their lives in all of Israel’s wars,

and in the pre-State days, the fighters and pioneers who

fashioned this wonderful land that we have inherited.

Shin Shalom, one of Israel’s greatest poets,

expressed it for all of us in his “Mother Jerusalem Singing”,

which he wrote a day after the Yom Kippur War in 1973:

“Love forever, glow forever,

cherish, yearn, preserve the kernel

of an everlasting nation, of a heritage eternal.”

Dvora Waysman

#ZionistHackers Defeating #OpIsrael

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

Last week ago I wrote about #OpIsrael the “planned new cyber attack against Israel”. My article ended by noting that “there will be plenty of Israeli geeks looking forward to the challenge – and quite capable of coming out on top”. I also tweeted my article to one of the Iranian backed anti-Israel hacker groups I mentioned and to one of the Anonymous news services. #OpIsrael was tagged as well. So to the anti-Israel hackers, don’t say I didn’t warn you that #OpIsrael was a really bad idea.

Sure enough, as #OpIsrael got underway, the official #OpIsrael site, www.opisrael.com, was hacked and is now playing Hatikvah.

The page was hacked by EhIsR and also contains a 20 point list of arguments in support of Israel (see below). Unlike the simple defacements that have typically targeted Israeli sites, this hack claims to have also destroyed all the data on the targeted server. This makes it a more serious attack, but in EhIsR’s defense  this was effectively an attack on an enemy infrastructure in a war like situation where as the attacks on NGOs and civilian infrastructure are more akin to targeting civilians.

EhIsR is not the only pro-Israel hacker, let’s call them Zionist Hackers, having a field day today. Not all are taking such an ethical approach to choosing their targets.

On the Israeli side as well, some hackers are going after soft targets or sites that for humanitarian reasons should be left out of any online war. As part of the pro-Israel response sites like the Palestinian Authority’s Medical Service website and a commercial site in Egypt have been hacked. A group called ‘Israel Elite Force’ claim to have taken down a range of sites in Pakistan. There are no doubt many more, and the day is still young.

While the Israeli hackers clearly have the technical skills that match or surpass those targeting Israel, the public diplomacy skills are still somewhat lacking.

A 20 point list of reasoned arguments shared in a defacement of a site that will be visited by those seeking to attack Israel, is not likely to convince anyone. Anti-Israel defacements typically use images, often fake or from different conflicts entirely, that display blood, guts, and gore and claim Israel is responsible for it. In other words, they use not just a technical means of sharing a message, but also demonization of Israel and a strong dose of victim-hood to spread their message.

The Zionist hackers like EhIsR are responding not with hate but with reason. It’s a shame that for most of the world such an approach is unlikely to be effective.

A better approach may have been to set off code red sirens and pictures of school children rushing for cover. More effective still, ethically more questionable, would have been a focus on the impact of terrorism. Israel avoids the publication of highly graphic images showing the aftermath of violence. An effort is made to get on with life. Perhaps not sharing this side of the conflict is a mistake. It promotes Israel’s toughness and resilience, but in the international community that simply makes Israel a legitimate target for further abuse.

The message that these Zionist hackers are ultimate projecting is the same message Israel has always gives in conventional warfare. The message says, “we’re tougher than you think, and attacking us is a really bad idea”. It may help security, but more is needed to win hearts and minds. For now though, I’m sure they’re celebrating their success… or at least they will be when they are finally done.

Here are EhIsR arguments:

1. Israel became a nation in 1312 BCE, two thousand years before the rise of Islam.

2. Arab refugees in Israel began identifying themselves as part of a Palestinian people in 1967, two decades after the establishment of the modern State of Israel.

3. Since the Jewish conquest in 1272 BCE, the Jews have had dominion over the land for one thousand years with a continuous presence in the land for the past 3,300 years.

4. The only Arab dominion since the conquest in 635 CE lasted no more than 22 years.

5. For over 3,300 years, Jerusalem has been the Jewish capital Jerusalem has never been the capital of any Arab or Muslim entity. Even when the Jordanians occupied Jerusalem, they never sought to make it their capital, and Arab leaders did not come to visit.

Dr. Andre Oboler

Peace Now: MKs Protesting Illegals Promoted Racism, Violence

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

The general director of Peace Now, Yariv Oppenheier, has urged Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein to open a criminal investigation into MKs Miri Regev (Likud), Danny Danon (Likud), and Michael Ben-Ari (National Union), for making speeches Wednesday in Tel Aviv he says incite racism and violence.

The speeches were made to approximately 1,000 protesters in South Tel Aviv’s Hatikva neighborhood, in response to a wave of illegal immigration and associated surge in crime in the area.  While some illegal immigrants have made the trek to Israel from Sudan and Eritrea to escape persecution, others have taken advantage of Israel’s high level of humanitarian aid and labor opportunities.

In her speech, Regev made comments such as “the infiltrators are a cancer in our body”, and advocated their deportation from Israel.  Twelve protesters were arrested during the event, which deteriorated into rioting.

According to local residents in south Tel Aviv, the streets have become unsafe, with women and the elderly afraid to walk outside.    On May 15, 4 Eritrean men were charged with raping a 19 year old Israeli woman in a parking lot in the area, one of several such incidents which have reportedly occurred since the area become a haven for illegal African immigrants.

Malkah Fleisher

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/peace-now-mks-protesting-illegals-promoted-racism-violence/2012/05/24/

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