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August 27, 2014 / 1 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘headline’

Why Bill Cosby is a Great Man

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Comedian Bill Cosby has had a monumental career in show business. From the very first time I heard his “Noah” routine, I never stopped laughing at his humor. What is so great about this man is that he knows the truth when he sees it and is not afraid to tell it like it is. He has in fact been criticized by some leaders of the black community for unfairly (according to them) speaking some of that truth.

But that isn’t the only reason he is great. About a year or two before he had his mega hit TV series in the 80s – the board of directors of Arie Crown Hebrew Day School had asked him to do a show for us as one of our fundraisers. He accepted. His fee was reasonable (and affordable for us) but he tacked on a condition that he could get out of his contract with us if something better came along. We agreed.

Shortly thereafter he received an offer to headline a show in Las Vegas that made it impossible for him to do a show for us in Chicago. He took it. But being the Mentch that he is, he promised us a show for next year at the same price.

Sure enough, one year later he gave us one of the funniest comedy performances I have ever attended. I don’t recall an audience laughing so many times or so hard. Arie Crown principal at the time, Rabbi Meir Shapiro, was doubled over with laughter. I don’t think I have ever seen him laugh so hard – before or since.

What was great about that show is that it did not contain any off color humor. Not even scatological humor. It was G rated and as funny as could be. Cosby is known for that. One might think that his standards are not our standards and that what he considered perfectly clean humor would be off color by our standards. Unfortunately Arie Crown had trusted other comedians’ promises to keep things clean. But to our dismay what was clean to them was off color to an Orthodox Jewish crowd.

Bill Cosby’s jokes were funny and clean by even our standards. The year after that comedy show, he went on to his mega successful series on NBC.

But that too is not all. I had never seen the video clip that is currently running on Aish. This was first broadcast on NBC way back in 1971 in an earlier TV series. It shows he truly understands anti-Semitism. And that he was not afraid to demonstrate what he saw as the cause of it on his own show. Thanks to Aish for finding this rare TV Clip and featuring it on their website.

Courtesy of Aish.com

Visit Emes Ve-Emunah.

‘Paul Ryan Will Not Be Mitt Romney’s Running Mate’

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

This is too delicious for words. On Friday, Bruce Bartlett of the Fiscal Times published a column under this very headline. It should obviously be filed under the “Dewey Beats Truman” category. Not the kind of thing I imagine Bartlett will be mentioning on his resume come his next job interview, but likely a topic to be touched during the same interview.

Bartlett writes knowingly: “All signs point to Romney nominating a ‘boring white guy’ who is unquestionably qualified to be president, who won’t show him up, and who will hopefully carry a key state. Personally, I would put my money on Senator Rob Portman of Ohio.”

There you go. And the Bartlett knowing tone continues unabashed:

“As far as Ryan himself is concerned, I don’t think he has the slightest desire to be vice president. While it is a good stepping stone to the presidency even for those who don’t achieve the office through death of a president, I don’t think that is Ryan’s ambition.”

And there’s the bit of insider’s wisdom:

“I’ve known Ryan since he was an intern for Jack Kemp many years ago. He is a true policy wonk who would rather talk about economics, the budget, tax policy, monetary policy and financial markets than just about anything. Moreover, I think he is happy being chairman of the House Budget Committee and knows that he is young enough—he’s only 42—that 2012 is unlikely to be his last chance to move up from the House of Representatives.”

And this political sundae comes with a cherry on top:

“I think if Ryan has any ambitions connected to Romney it would be to be his Office of Management and Budget director. In the event that Romney wins, I think he would take that job in a heartbeat. It’s a much better fit for both Ryan and Romney.”

With all of the above in mind, here are a few additional Fiscal Times articles for your consideration (did not make any of this up)

Unthinkable: Conflict between Israel and Iran

Abbas: Palestinian Spring is Here

And another one from Bartlett: “Why the Flat Tax Will Never Fly

I don’t support the flat tax, but if anyone was looking for points in favor of the thing, they should totally use “Bartlett said it’ll never happen.”

(Thanks to my friend Peretz Berk for the link)

Politicians Talk About the Universal Draft

Sunday, July 15th, 2012

Chief Rabbi Amar and President Peres met today and discussed the draft issue. They concluded that the debate must continue, but without extremism from any side. Peres restated that everyone must bear the burden.

Prime Minister Netanyahu announced at the weekly cabinet meeting that drafting every 18 year old makes for a good headline, but it’s not realistic. The introduction must be done gradually, as unity is just as important as sharing the burden. His goal is 6000 Chareidi draftees a  year by 2016.

Haaretz on its Daily Warpath

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

Once again the Haaretz newspaper is on the warpath, targeting its bitter Zionist enemy, the State of Israel.

Note the following headlines from the past 24 hours:

Hamas fires four rockets from Gaza into Israel, in rare move”  [Since when is it rare for Hamas to fire rockets at Israel or try to kill Jews? Just 3 days earlier, the Hamas orchastrated a rocket attack on Eilat]

IDF deploys tanks near Egypt border, in violation of peace treaty” [Ooops, Haaretz forgot to mention in the headline this was to quash a halt a real-time terror attack originating from the Egyptian held Sinai deset, in which an Israeli was killed.]

Israel agrees to release hunger-striking Palestinian soccer player” [Why bother mentioning in the headline that he's affiliated with terrorist organizations?]

Yet do we see Haaretz mention anything about Israeli MK Ahmed Tibi’s refusing to allow a space museum in the Israeli Arab of town — to be named for Israel’s first astronaut, Ilan Ramon?  Not a word.

Knesset Member Ahmad Tibi (United Arab List-Ta’al) has asked Science and Technology Minister Daniel Hershkowitz (Habayit Hayehudi) to cancel the plan to name a new space center in Tayibe after Ilan Ramon, the first Israeli astronaut.

Ramon was killed along with six other crew members of the Space Shuttle Columbia when it disintegrated upon re-entry on February 1, 2003.

MK Tibi explained his request by saying that during his service as a fighter pilot in the Israel Air Force Ramon took part in “bombings of civilian populations during the first Lebanon war and in attacks in other Arab countries.” (ynet)

Unless you consider yourself an anti-Zionist, its best to avoid reading Haaretz.

The ‘Israel Wins’ Headline

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010
This week’s The Way We Were feature (page 75) takes a look at the issue of The Jewish Press published during the first week of the Yom Kippur War. The headline on that week’s front page became something of a legend – and not in a positive way.
Back in 2007 the Monitor put that headline in perspective and made the case that it wasn’t something so outlandish after all. It seems fitting to run that column again, slightly modified, as we mark the anniversary of the start of that war.
A reader raised the issue of the “Israel Wins” headline that appeared on the front page of The Jewish Press during the first week of the 1973 Yom Kippur War.
The reader noted that for years – even decades – afterward, that headline was a staple in the conversation of just about anyone intent on disparaging the paper. Why this was so she’s not exactly sure – true, the war was far from won at the time, and the huge type the paper chose to use fairly screamed “cheesy tabloid” – but, as she recalled, all media outlets were bullish on a quick Israeli victory in the opening days of the war.
The reader was absolutely right, and perhaps now is as good a time as any to look at some of the circumstances surrounding that headline.
The early 1970′s were a relatively primitive time in terms of news transmission. There were no personal computers, no 24-hour cable news channels, and of course there was no Internet. News footage was shot on film; transporting it even short distances and then processing it took several hours, and footage from overseas took even longer. News traveled at a much more relaxed pace compared to what we’ve since become accustomed to. It could take days for perceptions to take hold, let alone change from one extreme to another.
The Yom Kippur War commenced on Saturday, Oct. 6. The Sunday newspapers in America carried some sketchy accounts of the war’s preliminary stages. Greater detail began to emerge on Monday, with The New York Times’s Terence Smith reporting that “Israeli forces have blocked the advance of Egyptian and Syrian armies and cut off a force of about 400 Egyptian tanks that had established two bridgeheads on the eastern bank of the Suez Canal…”
That same day, the Times’s Robert McFadden wrote: “Claiming superiority in the skies, Israel said her jets had struck deep inside Egypt and Syria, crippled Syrian air defenses and severed nine of 11 Egyptian bridges across the Suez Canal…”
On Tuesday Oct. 9, the Times’s Charles Mohr, reporting from Tel Aviv, weighed in: “Israeli officers began today to refer to the Middle East war in the past tense, personally confident that the short-term outcome was now a foregone conclusion…”
The new issue of Time magazine informed readers that “By Sunday morning, after nearly a day of intense fighting, Israeli forces had seized the initiative on both fronts…. Defense Minister Moshe Dayan said that the mop-up might take several days, but that the curious battle of Yom Kippur was already decided.”
The Jewish Press is put to bed Tuesday evenings. As of Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 9, the newspapers, the newsweeklies, television and radio all were painting a picture of an aroused Israel roaring back after having suffered setbacks very early on. The media completely fell for the line being peddled by the Israeli government.
If you were composing a headline for a Jewish newspaper on that particular day, the choice of “Israel Wins” made perfect sense – particularly if the newspaper was a weekly and you didn’t want to appear outdated by the end of the week when, as everyone thought they knew from all the optimistic reports coming out of Israel, the fighting would be over with the Arabs in full retreat.
By the end of that first week of war, however, it was clear that far from winning handily, Israel was taking heavy casualties, the Arab armies were performing better than anyone had expected, and there was no indication as to when the fighting would be over and in what shape Israel would emerge from it.
The tone of the following week’s Jewish Press reflected the altered perception, with coverage that can best be described as disappointed though cautiously optimistic. But the “Israel Wins” headline took on a life of its own, becoming a cudgel in the hands of critics intent on ignoring the similar reporting to be found in other media outlets during those first frenzied days of fighting.

 

 

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com.

That Infamous Jewish Press Headline

Thursday, April 5th, 2007

The Monitor’s rumination last week on unjustified criticism directed against The Jewish Press brought a note from a longtime reader who raised the now infamous “Israel Wins” headline that appeared on the front page of The Jewish Press during the first week of the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

The reader noted that for years – even decades – afterward, that headline was a staple in the conversation of just about anyone intent on disparaging the paper. Why this was so she’s not exactly sure – true, the war was far from won at the time, and the huge type the paper chose to use fairly screamed “cheesy tabloid” – but, as she recalled, all media outlets were bullish on a quick Israeli victory in the opening days of the war, and no one went around years later chuckling about how The New York Times got it wrong or how CBS News jumped the gun.

The early 1970’s were a relatively primitive time in terms of news transmission. There were no fax machines, no personal computers, no 24-hour cable news channels, and of course there was no Internet. News footage was shot on film; transporting it even short distances and then processing it took several hours – footage from overseas even longer. It could take days for perceptions to take hold, let alone change from one extreme to another.

The Yom Kippur War commenced on Saturday, Oct. 6. The Sunday newspapers in America carried some sketchy accounts of the war’s preliminary stages. Greater detail began to emerge on Monday, with The New York Times’s Terence Smith reporting that “Israeli forces have blocked the advance of Egyptian and Syrian armies and cut off a force of about 400 Egyptian tanks that had established two bridgeheads on the eastern bank of the Suez Canal…”

That same day, the Times’s Robert McFadden wrote: “Claiming superiority in the skies, Israel said her jets had struck deep inside Egypt and Syria, crippled Syrian air defenses and severed nine of 11 Egyptian bridges across the Suez Canal…”

On Tuesday Oct. 9, the Times’s Charles Mohr, reporting from Tel Aviv, weighed in: “Israeli officers began today to refer to the Middle East war in the past tense, personally confident that the short-term outcome was now a foregone conclusion…”

The new issue of Time magazine informed readers that “By Sunday morning, after nearly a day of intense fighting, Israeli forces had seized the initiative on both fronts…. Defense Minister Moshe Dayan said that the mop-up might take several days, but…that the curious battle of Yom Kippur was already decided.”

The Jewish Press is put to bed Tuesday evenings. As of Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 9, the newspapers, the newsweeklies, television and radio all were painting a picture of an aroused Israel roaring back after having suffered setbacks very early on. The media completely fell for the line being peddled by the Israeli government.

If you were composing a headline for a Jewish newspaper on that particular day, the choice of “Israel Wins” made perfect sense – particularly if the newspaper was a weekly and you didn’t want to appear outdated by the end of the week when, as everyone knew from all the optimistic reports coming out of Israel, the fighting would be over, the Arabs in full retreat.

By the end of that first week of war, however, it was clear that far from winning handily, Israel was taking heavy casualties, the Arab armies were performing better than anyone had expected, and there was no indication as to when the fighting would be over and in what shape Israel would emerge from it.

The tone of the following week’s Jewish Press reflected the altered perception, with coverage that can best be described as disappointed, even bewildered, if still cautiously optimistic. But that “Israel Wins” headline took on a life of its own, becoming a favored cudgel in the hands of Jewish Press critics.

As recently as four years ago, a reader informed the Monitor that the editor of another Jewish newspaper had just mentioned the headline – this was thirty years after the Yom Kippur War, mind you – while giving a speech about Jewish media. The reference was not meant to be positive.

That editor is both old enough and intelligent enough to know how the media initially portrayed the Yom Kippur War. It’s distracting, though, to be bothered with facts when you’re busy grinding an ax.

Newsday And Abuse In The Jewish Community

Friday, July 4th, 2003

As we noted several weeks ago, despite the continuing coverage of claims of abuse in our yeshivas, attesting to the significance we attach to the problem, we nonetheless expressed our serious reservations about how the issue was treated in The Jewish Week.

We concluded that as serious as the issue is, The Jewish Week’s effort was overblown and reeked of an effort to pursue its agenda of portraying Orthodoxy in a negative light. Sadly,
Newsday attempted the same thing last week, although the goal, and it went to extraordinary lengths to reach it, was to liken abuse in the Orthodox community to the plague engulfing the Catholic Church.

Thus, in a series of five articles last week, several either beginning or blurbed on the front page, Newsday purported to ventilate, as one headline put it, “A ‘Crisis’ For Jewish Leaders” with the explanatory subheading, “Struggling With Allegations Against Rabbis of Sex Abuse.”

In the course of the five article series, Newsday invoked the names of all of eight rabbis. However, while three were, in fact, convicted of abuse, two were acquitted of all charges, and
authorities declined to charge another because there was no evidence to do so. With respect to the other two, one has yet to be formally charged, and the other fled the relevant jurisdiction.

Is there a problem if even one child is abused? Of course. Is there a “crisis?” Newsday doesn’t know of one. It certainly didn’t document it.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/editorial/newsday-and-abuse-in-the-jewish-community/2003/07/04/

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