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July 28, 2016 / 22 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘health’

Tiberias Hospital Brings Health Knowledge to ‘Lost Tribe’ Jews

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

The Baruch Padeh Medical Center, Poriya, located on the ridge above Tiberias by the Kinneret, is accommodating the special needs of Jewish immigrants who must be transferred not only geographically, from the exotic regions of earth, but also in time, from forgotten ages to the 21st century.

A case in point is the community of Bnei Menashe, a small group of indigenous people from northeastern India, who claim they are descendants from the lost tribes of Israel, and have adopted the practice of Judaism. The Bnei Menashe speak Tibeto-Burman languages, and they probably migrated into northeast India from Burma in the 17th and 18th centuries. Israeli Rabbi Eliyahu Avichail, of the group Amishav which seeks evidence of the existence of exiled “ten tribes” in the world, named the group Bnei Menashe based on their account of descent from the tribe of Menasseh.

When a group of about 7,000 of these northeastern Indian Jews arrived in Israel six years ago, some of whom settled down in the vicinity of Tiberias (which is quite aways to the north of where the Biblical tribe of Menashe originally lived), the local hospital has taken upon itself to usher them into the wonderful medical advantages of modern times. And so the Baruch Padeh Medical Center, Poriya, a week ago hosted a meeting of agroup of Bnei Menashe women with its infectious diseases supervisor, Nurse Ilana Aharon from the Epidemiology Department.

The meeting, at the local chapter of WIZO, explored hygiene as the key to health. This included personal hygiene and dental hygiene, as well as keeping homes, courtyards and streets clean. Aharon also covered the importance of proper nutrition—eating vegetables every day—and physical exercise in maintaining health.

Another issue stressed in the meeting was the danger of smoking, which causes a long list of damages to health in addition to lung cancer: diminishing vitamin C deposits, blood diseases, impaired vision, and impotence. Most of the smokers in the Bnei Menashe community are the husbands, but family members suffer by exposure to secondary smoke.

JNi.Media

Health & Living: May 2016

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

Jewish Press Staff

Health & Living: February 2016

Monday, February 29th, 2016

Jewish Press Staff

Higher Incidence of Cancer, Asthma Found in Haifa

Monday, February 8th, 2016

A senior Health Ministry official confirmed Monday that a higher incidence of cancer and asthma has been found in Haifa.

The data emerged from a study by a research team at the University of Haifa, using data from 2012 up to the present.

The specific affected residential areas are primarily the side of Mount Carmel facing the industrial zone, the southeastern part of Kiryat Tivon, Kiryat Haim, and Kiryat Bialik.

The data show the incidence of lung cancer and lymphoma is up to five times higher than the national average among adult residents in the city.

In addition, babies born to residents in these areas have birth weights and head sizes 20 to 30 percent lower than those in other parts of the city.

Moreover, a study of children in Haifa ages 6 to 14 show the incidence of asthma was 2.5 times higher in the port city than in other less polluted areas.

Of growing concern is the damage to the developing fetus that is also becoming clearer, and which has implications for other health problems later in life as well.

It is believed by researchers at the University of Haifa that chemicals emitted by factories in the city are responsible for at least some of the problem.

The current research study by the University of Haifa team is nearing the end of the first year of a five-year project led by Prof. Boris Portnov and Dr. Jonathan Dubnov. The team is culling its data from the health maintenance organizations (HMO/kupat holims), hospitals, the IDF and cancer databases).

The initial findings, to be published in March, so far have also indicated that air pollution has not declined in recent years. The interim conclusions will be submitted at the end of the month to the relevant authorities, including the Health and Environmental Protection Ministries.

Hana Levi Julian

Israelis to Have Long-Term Care Insurance Next Year, Says Litzman

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

Health Minister Yaakov Litzman said on a national broadcast network Thursday that by early next year Israelis will have long-term care insurance.

The current situation in which families are forced to pay huge sums for private long-term care insurance policies for such coverage is “intolerable and must not continue,” he said.

Litzman stressed that Finance Minister and Kulanu party chairman Moshe Kahlon supports him in this matter.

The health minister said on the Channel 2 program, “Seder Yom,” that he has no doubt the coalition agreement applies to the creation of national long-term care insurance.

Hana Levi Julian

Research Links Being Religious with a Happy Life – but only for Jews

Friday, December 25th, 2015

Observant Jews are happier with life, and Jews living in Hareidi cities can expect to live longer than others, according to a new study by the Taub Center for Social Studies.

However, the researchers cautioned:

It is important to note that the relatively positive self-reports of Hareidim may also be due to a social norm that frowns on complaining, and would particularly disapprove of ‘airing one’s dirty laundry’ in the context of a secular survey.

Previous studies have concluded that religious involvement is a factor in satisfaction with aspects of living, and Taub researchers reported:

Relatively high percentages of Hareidim attest to being very happy with their relationships with family members: 80.2 percent versus 62.7 percent or less in other population groups….

A relatively low percentage of Hareidim report feelings of loneliness. Only 11.4 percent of Hareidim said that they were lonely, compared with at least twice that amount among other groups.

The link does necessarily apply to non-Jews. The researchers stated::

A rise in satisfaction levels moving up the religiosity scale does not appear among non-Jews. About 37.7 percent of non-Jewish respondents in the study who identified as very religious or religious felt lonely – more than the not very religious (30.7 percent) and the non-religious (30.0 percent).

The report also stated that Hareidim can expect to live three years longer than others in Israel.

A direct link was found “between a city’s socioeconomic and the life expectancy of its residents” but the trend is different for Hareidim in Beit Shemesh, Bnei Brak and Jerusalem, according to the study.

The researchers also noted a study carried out in 1996 that showed that national religious Jews living on kibbutzim have a lower mortality write than secular kibbutzniks.

The 1996 study stated:

These findings indicate that, even in closed and highly-structured communities such as kibbutzim, level of religious observance has an impact on health status.

The latest Taub study noted that then-Finance Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s drastic reduction in child welfare payments more than a decade ago, in addition to the global financial crisis in 2008, “hurt Hareidi families financially” but also ” led many Hareidim to vocational study and employment.”

 

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Litzman Pressures Reluctant Hospitals to Shorten Wait for MRI Scans

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

At least two medical centers in Israel are locked in a power struggle with the Health Ministry over funding support for MRI procedures.

The number of MRI exams carried out in the afternoon and evening hours was seriously reduced beginning December 1 by the Clalit HMO at Beilinson Medical Center in Petach Tikvah and Be’er Sheva’s Sorokah Medical Center, Galei Tzahal Army Radio reported Tuesday.

This, despite a reform announced by Health Minister Ya’acov Litzman that was supposed to sharply cut the long wait for such procedures.

Because the MRI machine-hours have been slashed in the afternoon and evening hours at the two hospitals, many clinics have been unable to schedule patients for MRI exams as well.

Officials blamed a lack of state funding was responsible for the cut in services.

“Unfortunately we ran out of funds to operate the second shift, so we were forced to reduce our services by 30 percent,” said a spokesperson for Beilinson Medical Center.

“Operating the MRI in afternoon and evening hours is only possible with funding from the state,” said Soroka Medical Center. “The budget just could not stretch far enough, and therefore our services were reduced.”

The Ministry of Health has responded that the “availability and quality of services in the health basket are dependent upon the financial situation of the specific health fund; the ministry will review the matter with the director-general.”

However, Litzman added bluntly that if the hospitals did not cooperate and shorten the wait for MRI exams, he would “not hesitate to cancel their arrangements of choice.”

Such arrangements refer to agreements between the HMOs and hospitals to determine which medical center receives patients for which particular treatment.

Such a decision can exert major influence on an institution’s economic development.

Bottom line: if the hospitals don’t step up and cooperate, the health ministry is not likely to provide them with the support they need for further growth — at least, as long as Ya’acov Litzman remains health minister.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/litzman-pressures-reluctant-hospitals-to-shorten-wait-for-mri-scans/2015/12/22/

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