web analytics
October 25, 2014 / 1 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Hebrew’

In Hebrew: ‘Connected’

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

מְחֻבָּר, מְחֻבֶּרֶת From the Biblical book of Psalms:

יְרוּשָׁלִַם הַבְּנוּיָה כְּעִיר שֶׁחֻבְּרָה לָהּ יַחְדָּו. Built-up Jerusalem is as a city that was joined together with itself. In case we get lost in the obscurity of that statement, the psalm goes on to explain that Jerusalem is the place of gathering for the diverse tribes of Israel. It is also the home of justice. The psalm then implores the reader to seek out the peace of Jerusalem, for the sake of brotherly love – it seems as if brotherly love depends on peace in Jerusalem (see Hebrew and English here).

The word used to mean it (Jerusalem) was joined is חֻבְּרָה, a passive-intensiveפֻּעַל verb, expressed in the past tense. חוברהalso means it was connected.

To describe someone as connected, you’d use the word מְחֻבָּרin the masculine and מְחֻבֶּרֶתin the feminine.

An example, in the plural:

אֲנַחְנוּ כֻּלָּנוּ מְחֻבָּרִים מִפְּנֵי שֶׁאֲנַחְנוּ כֻּלָּנוּ בְּנֵי אָדָם. We are connected since we’re all human beings. Jerusalem is the city of peace. I venture to say that it’s also the city of חִבּוּר- connection.

Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Rainforest’

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

יַעַר גֶּשֶׁם A rainforest is a place of astounding beauty and biodiversity. Rainforests are also responsible for 28% of the world’s oxygen, according to Wikipedia.

The Hebrew term for rainforest is a literal translation of the English – יַעַר גֶּשֶׁם, where יער means forest and גשם means rain.

An example in context:

“לִפְעָמִים קוֹרְאִים לְיַעֲרוֹת הַגֶּשֵׁם “הָרֵאוֹת שֶׁל הָעוֹלָם
The rainforests are sometimes called “the lungs of the earth.”
Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Air Conditioner’

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

מַזְגָן I stayed once in a Paris hotel for a few days in July. It was sweltering hot, and there was no air conditioner in the room. When I inquired why, the hotel staff told that it only gets that hot a few days in the year, so there’s no real need.

In Israel, air conditioners are already blowing lots of cold air on those escaping from the heat (which I don’t mind so much).

The Hebrew term for air conditioner is מַזְגָן. Its root is מ.ז.ג meaning blending or merging - the air is blended inside the machine and blown out, also blendingconditioning the air in the room. So a מזגן is literally that which blends.

An example:

בְּתֵל אָבִיב, יֵשׁ אֲנָשִׁים שֶׁמְּבַלִּים אֶת כָּל הַקַּיִץ עִם הַמַּזְגָן. In Tel Aviv, there are people who spend the whole summer with the air conditioner. I don’t live in Tel Aviv, but if I did, I wouldn’t be one of those people.

You might also hear Israelis using the term מִזּוּג אֲוִיר. This means, literally,air conditioning, as מיזוגis the noun form of the active-intensive פִּעֵל verb, לְמַזֵּגto blendto merge.

Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Environment’

Monday, May 6th, 2013

סְבִיבָה

With summer coming in the northern hemisphere and air-conditioning (entry on that tomorrow) set to full blast in Israeli homes and vehicles, this week’s a good time to introduce some Hebrew terms about climate and environment.

The Hebrew word for environment is סְבִיבָה. It’s a verbal noun of the root ס.ו.ב (s.w.b) meaning going around – the same root as that of the word for dreidelסְבִיבוֹן.

Some usages of סביבה:

הַמִּשְׂרָד לַהֲגָנַת הַסְּבִיבָה
Ministry for Environmental Protection (literally, for the protection of the environment)

צָרִיךְ לִדְאוֹג לַסְּבִיבָה הַיּוֹם לְעַמַן הַדּוֹר שֶׁל מָחָר.
We must take care of the environment today for the sake of tomorrow’s generation.

סְבִיבָה מִשְׂרָדִית נְעִימָה מְאַפְשֶׁרֶת עֲבוֹדָה פּוֹרָה.
A pleasant office environment enables productive work.

Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Behavior’

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

הִתְנַהֲגוּת To behave is to conduct oneself in a certain way. It is therefore not surprising that the Hebrew word for to behave comes from the Biblical root meaning conduct or drive -נ.ה.ג (n.h.g).

To behave is לְהִתְנַהֵג (leh-heet-nah-HEG), a reflexive-intensive התפעל verb.

And following the verbal-noun pattern, behavior is הִתְנַהֲגוּת (heet-nah-hah-GOOT).

For example, הַהִתְנַהֲגוּת שֶׁל הַיָּלְדָה הִיא לֹא מְקֻבֶּלֶתthe girl’s behavior is unacceptable - (hah-heet-nah-hah-GOOT shel hah-yahl-DAH hee loh meh-koo-BEH-let).

Some other words of the same root are מִנְהָגcustom or tradition (meen-HAHG),לִנְהוֹגto drive (leen-HOHG) and לְהַנְהִיגto lead (leh-hahn-HEEG).

Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Return’

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

לַחְזוֹר, לָשׁוּב


Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Pride’

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

גַּאֲוָה

Pride – what a contentious emotion. On the one hand, religions list it among the most grievous of sins or character traits. On the other hand, the gay community calls upon it as their staple state of being. But perhaps more accessible to most people is that swelling-up feeling inside, when we know we’ve done a good job, when someone speaks of our native country in a foreign land… or when someone we love is shining in the spotlight. The Hebrew word for pride is גַּאֲוָה, while proud is גֵּאֶה in the masculine and גֵּאָה in the feminine.

For example:

לִבִּי מִתְמַלֵּא בְּגַּאֲוָה כְּשֶׁאֲנִי רוֹאֶה דֶּגֶל כָּחוֹל לָבָן. My heart is filled with pride when I see a blue-and-white flag. and

הִיא גֵּאָה בַּבֵּן שֶׁלָּהּ. She’s proud of her son. To take pride is לְהִתְגָּאוֹת.
For example:

בַּמֶּה רָאוּי לְהִתְגָּאוֹת, וּבַמֶּה לֹּא?
What is worthy of taking pride in, and what not?
Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/in-hebrew-pride/2013/05/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: