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April 29, 2016 / 21 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Hillary Clinton’

UPDATE: Super Tuesday: Clinton, Trump Big Winners, Cruz, Sanders, Rubio Eke Out Wins

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

A Democratic candidate needs to win 2,383 delegates and a Republican candidate needs to secure 1,237 delegates to secure the nomination. Going into Super Tuesday, Hillary Clinton was way out in front, with 266 delegates pledged, to 136 for Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump had 82 delegates, Texas Senator Ted Cruz had 17, Florida Senator Marco Rubio had 16 and Ohio Gov. John Kasich with six delegates and Dr. Ben Carson with five.

The following results are with sufficient results in to call most races, although with fewer than 100 percent of the votes counted. The delegate numbers will change slightly.

ALABAMA  With 50 delegates for the Republicans and 60 delegates for the Democrats at stake, Hillary Clinton (D) and Donald Trump (R) won their respective primaries. Clinton received 30 delegates, Sanders 1, and Trump received 20.

ALASKA Only the Republicans had a primary on March 1. There were 28 delegates at stake. The results were not yet in on this race before this article was published. UPDATE: Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won the Republican primary, pocketing 12 delegates.

ARKANSAS 40 Republicans and 37 Democrats Hillary Clinton won for the Democrats. Clinton received 17 delegates and Sanders six. Donald Trump won for the Republicans.

COLORADO Only the Democrats had a primary on March 1, and there were 79 delegates at stake. The results were not yet in before this article was published to call the race, but with 21 percent of the precincts reporting, Bernie Sanders was leading Hillary Clinton. UPDATE: Sen. Sanders won the Democratic caucus, adding 33 delegates to his total.

GEORGIA  There were 76 delegates for Republicans and 79 for Democrats in play in Georgia. Donald Trump (R) and Hillary Clinton (D) won their primaries. Trump won 30 delegates, Cruz one, Clinton won 57 and Sanders received 21.

MASSACHUSETTS With 42 Republican delegates  and 116 delegates for Democrats, Donald Trump (R) and Hillary Clinton (D) won their respective primaries. Trump received 18 delegates and Rubio received five.

MINNESOTA Has a caucus, not a primary. There were 38 delegates for Republicans and 93 Democratic delegates at stake. Insufficient votes were counted to make solid predictions about the winners before this article was published. With 53 percent of the precincts reporting, Marco Rubio was in the lead and Donald Trump in second place for the Republicans. With 15 percent of the precincts reporting, Bernie Sanders was beating Hillary Clinton. UPDATE: Florida Sen. Marco Rubio won for the Republicans, with 14 delegates added to his total, and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton, adding 42 delegates to his tally.

OKLAHOMA There are 43 Republican delegates at stake and 42 Democrats in Oklahoma. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders came in first in the Democratic race and Ted Cruz came in first for the Republicans.

TENNESSEE There are 58 Republican delegates and 76 Democratic delegates available in Tennessee. Hillary Clinton (D) and Donald Trump (R) came in first in their respective parties.

TEXAS There are 155 Republican delegates and 252 Democratic delegates at stake. This is not a winner takes all state. Hometown Sen. Ted Cruz won the Texas Republican primary with an 11 point lead over Donald Trump, and Hillary Clinton won in the Democratic primary. For his win, Cruz received 32 delegates, Trump 14, Clinton won 120 delegates and Sanders 42 delegates.

VERMONT With 16 delegates for the Republicans and 26 delegates available for the Democrats. Sanders (D) and Trump (R) finished first in their respective primaries. Trump walked away with five delegates, Kasich doubled his delegates to 10 because of Vermont and Sanders received ten.

VIRGINIA There are 49 delegates available for the Republicans and 110 for the Democrats. Donald Trump (R) beat out Marco Rubio in a close race, in a state in which delegates are divided. Hillary Clinton won in the Democratic primary.

 

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Hillary Emails: How to Demote AIPAC to its Proper Place

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

The previously secret emails of former U.S. secretary of state and current favorite to be the Democratic contender for the U.S. president Hillary Rodham Clinton are a bonanza for those seeking to discern her non-public face and those of her closest advisers with respect to Israel.

With more than 30,000 emails released, drip, drip, drip since December, 2014, there’s a lot to plow through.

But one omnipresent correspondent of Clinton’s, her former advisor Sidney Blumenthal, stands out as he harps away at two issues close to his heart: one, Israel, the object of deep hostility, and the other, his son Max, a source of immense pride. That one’s son is a source of pride to a father is neither surprising nor shameful. But most of what Blumenthal promotes about his son Max is the never-ending fusillade of hate screeds written by the son in frequently obscure outlets which are directed at the other Blumenthal obsession: Israel.

In the batch released over the weekend, several Blumenthal emails attacks on Israel stand out in particular.  One offers advice to Clinton on how to make both the Jewish State and the largest American pro-Israel organization, AIPAC, bend to her will.

In an email dated March 21, 2010, Blumenthal tells Clinton how she should optimize the speech she was about to give to the American Israel Public Action Committee. It is all about bringing the dog to heel.

First, Blumenthal admonishes Clinton to “[h]old Bibi’s feet to the fire.” He suggests that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu must be reminded that “Israel has no oil,” all it has it values, and by failing to pursue peace with the Palestinian Arabs, Blumenthal urges Hillary to tell the Jews, Israel is squandering that.

Blumenthal also has his needle stuck on the Wye Plantation Agreement, and he  is convinced that only one person is responsible for the breakdown in the peace process:  Bibi Netanyahu. Blumenthal cannot find a single fault on the Arab side worth identifying as even one cause among many for the lack of a resolution to the decades-long conflict.

He sees the U.S. as the creator of peace between Israel and Jordan, and Israel and Egypt, and he actually believes and writes Wye was a success. He urges Hillary to build on it so the U.S. can make peace really happen this time with “Palestine.”  But, he insists, that means overcoming one obstacle:  Bibi.

Blumenthal’s emails reveal a conviction of Zionists (he thinks they are all Likudniks) in control of American policy-making organs that would shame Lindbergh, while at the same time he instructs Hillary to fight back against this monster by threatening it with recognition for a more pliable competitor:  J Street.

He urges Clinton:

remind [AIPAC] in as subtle but also a direct way as you can that it does not have a monopoly over American Jewish opinion.  Bibi is stage managing USJewish organizations (and neocons, and the religious right, and whomever else he can muster) against the administration.  AIPAC itself has become an organ of the Israeli right, specifically Likud.  By acknowledging J Street you give them legitimacy, credibility [one wonders why they didn’t have these things before being given a bracha by the U.S. Secretary of State’s advisor] and create room within the American Jewish community for debate supportive of the administration’s pursuit of the peace process. Just by mentioning J Street in passing, AIPAC becomes a point on the spectrum, not the controller of the spectrum.

There’s a good deal more in this treasure trove that the Jewish American public should know about, and the JewishPress.com will continue publishing on this important topic. Our grandmothers warned us (or was it that famous TV commercial for an insurance company?) that people are known by the company they keep.  Hillary kept company with Sidney for a very long time, and paid him for years to send her emails just like this one. His views tells us a lot about hers.

 

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Clinton Trounces Sanders in South Carolina

Sunday, February 28th, 2016

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sailed to an easy win in South Carolina in the Democratic primary there on Saturday, Feb. 27.

Clinton outscored her rival, Vermont senator Bernie Sanders, nearly three-to-one.

Clinton’s big base that boosted her for the win was a solid wall of support from black voters. Nearly nine in ten black voters pulled the lever for Clinton on Saturday, according to exit polls.

As the result of Saturday’s win, Clinton has 542 delegates. Sanders has 83 delegates thus far. It takes 2,383 delegates to nail down the nomination.

On the Republican side, Donald Trump remains in the lead with 82 delegates thus far. Vying neck and neck for second place are Sen. Ted Cruz (TX) with 17 delegates and Sen. Marco Rubio, with 16.

“Tomorrow, this campaign goes national,” Clinton declared at her victory rally in Columbia, S.C.

Between March 1 and March 8, primaries will be held in more than a dozen states.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Clinton Wins Nevada Caucus, Trump Takes SC, Bush is Out

Sunday, February 21st, 2016

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton won a narrow victory in Nevada’s Democratic caucus – but the primary was held on a Saturday and therefore excluded all observant Jewish voters.

Even so, the heavy turnout indicated that Clinton is going to face an uphill battle even in states she thought she might win handily. At the end, with 85 percent of the precincts reporting in Nevada, the two-time First Lady won 53-47.

Sanders congratulated Clinton on her victory and said he looked forward to the primaries and caucuses ahead.

The Republican contest in South Carolina on the same day involved a far broader field, but Donald Trump again triumphed with 33 percent, although his victory margin has narrowed. Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio battled for second place with 99 percent of the precincts reporting; Rubio had a slim lead with slightly more than 22 percent. Rubio had placed third in Iowa, where Cruz won.

Jeb Bush decided to suspend his campaign after a night in which the numbers made it clear he was just not in the picture for this year’s run. It is not yet clear to whom he will encourage his supporters to turn.

At his victory rally, Trump dismissed the idea that other candidates would benefit from Bush’s decision to end his campaign. “[Analysts] don’t understand that as people drop out, I’m going to get a lot of those votes,” he said. He acknowledged the negative turn the race had taken, saying it had become “mean” and “vicious” but added, “When you win, it’s beautiful.”

In typical businessman manner, he ended his speech as if closing a deal: “Let’s put this thing away, and let’s make America great again.”

Hana Levi Julian

Republican Presidential Field Continues to Narrow

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

After the results of the first two election battles in this U.S. presidential campaign season, the crowd has begun to thin out.

After the Iowa caucus and before the New Hampshire primary, Governors Mike Huckabee and Martin O’Malley dropped out.

And now, with disappointing results in Tuesday’s primary, Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey and Carly Fiorina, the former head of Hewlett-Packard, both called it quits.

Look for still more to fall by the wayside as the intense primary season proceeds full steam. While the frontrunner Donald Trump, followed by Gov. John Kasich, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush are all probably in the running for quite a bit longer, it won’t come as surprise to political viewers if neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson soon calls it quits unless he gets a top tier showing in the next few primaries.

The South Carolina Republican primary will take place on Feb. 20, with Democratic contenders Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders going head to head in South Carolina the following Sturday, on Feb. 27. That same week are the Nevada contests, with Democrats voting on Feb. 20 and the Republicans just a few days later on Feb. 23.

March 1 will be a huge day, with more than a dozen contests scheduled, including Alabama, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. By the time that is over, the pecking order should be quite a bit clearer.

The contests will continue right up until the District of Columbia primary on Tuesday, June 14.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Trump and Sanders on Top in New Hampshire

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

The two long-shots each came in first in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Donald Trump bested the other Republicans and Bernie Sanders was the chosen Democratic nominee.

The networks called the Republican race shortly after 8:00 p.m. As of press time there was no clear second place finisher, although Gov. John Kasich seemed to be pushing ahead, with Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Ted Cruz battling for third place.

New Hampshire residents are notoriously hard to pin down on predictive polls. This year was no different; a CNN exit poll showed 46 percent of Republican primary voters made up their minds only in the last three days.

The win for Sanders was decisive. Less than an hour after the polls closed at 8:00 p.m., Hillary Clinton called Sanders to concede the race. With 21 percent of the precincts reporting, Sanders had a solid 58 percent, with Clinton trailing at 40 percent.

All political watchers now swivel towards South Carolina, which holds its primary on Feb. 20.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Iowa Caucus Produces Cruz for GOP But No Clear Winner for Democrats

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

The two presidential candidates for the Democratic party are still not clear about which one of them won this round in the Iowa caucus.

The process in the state is not a simple primary election as in most others, but rather operates as a “gathering of neighbors” around the state. Voters meet to talk about the candidates, take an initial vote, discuss and then vote again.

The state holds 44 elected delegates who will ultimately help determine the nominee at the Democratic National Convention this summer.

Although campaign officials for Hillary Clinton said the former Secretary of State won a slim victory over Bernie Sanders on Monday, his campaign said the results were not settled: there remain questions in several counties.

The Iowa Democratic Party itself said results in the state were the closest in Iowa Democratic caucus history, and no winner has yet been officially declared.

Clinton and Sanders remained in a virtual dead heat overnight according to every media outlet.

A statement from the party leader called it a “historically close” finish but did not declare a winner. Clinton won 699.57 state delegates, Sanders had 695.49, Martin O’Malley had 7.68 and there were an uncommitted number that totaled 0.46, with one Des Moines precinct that had not yet reported in, with a total of 2.28 state delegate equivalents.

By the end of the night, Martin O’Malley decided to suspend his campaign.

Clinton led among women, and Sanders led among men, according to CBS News. First-time caucus attendees supported Sanders over Clinton, 59 percent to 37 percent. He also drew more support among the “under 30″ crowd – 84 percent – and 58 percent in the 30 to 45 age group. Clinton held sway among those in the 45 to 64 age range (58 percent) and the over 65 crowd (69 percent). The “very liberal” Democrats supported Sanders over Clinton, 58 percent to 39 percent.

The Republican caucus came up with a win for Texas Senator Ted Cruz, and at least a stall for billionaire celebrity Donald Trump. Cruz led the candidates with 28 percent of the vote, followed by Trump with 24 percent, and Florida Senator Marco Rubio extremely close behind with 23 percent, still in the top three.

Cruz set a Republican caucus record on Monday night by winning more than 50,000 votes. The senator is clearly preferred over Trump by the GOP rank-and-file party establishment, although it is still too early to tell who will represent the party in November.

That did not stop Cruz from underlining his anti-Washington Insider campaign in a speech at the end of the evening.

“Iowa has sent notice that the Republican nominees for the next president of the United States will not be chosen by the Washington establishment, will not be chosen by the lobbyists,” Cruz said at a victory party at the Iowa state fair in Des Moines. Instead, he said, the candidate will be “chosen by the most incredibly powerful force where all sovereignty resides in our nation, by ‘we the people’ – the American people.”

Hana Levi Julian

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