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April 21, 2014 / 21 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘home care’

Israeli Startup Provides Home Care for Elderly

Monday, January 13th, 2014

An Israeli startup provides unusually comprehensive home care for seniors and peace of mind for their families.

According to an annual report released last September by the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, Israelis are living longer, happier lives, and life expectancy for men now stands at 79.9 years, and 83.6 for women.

An inevitable consequence is that many elderly persons live alone. Spouses die, children marry and establish their own lives, some in distant cities and others abroad, and with passing years the number of close friends and relatives become fewer and fewer.

Because of the pressures of modern life and the demands of their own offspring, many adults feel guilty about being unable to give their parents the attention they deserve. In addition, those who live in distant cities or abroad become anxious about the increasing care required by aging parents.

According to a Pew Research Center survey of adults in the USA with at least one parent age 65 or older, 30% report that their parent or parents need help caring for themselves.

To meet the needs of this aging population in Israel, the Beth Protea non-profit retirement home has initiated Protea Home Care (PHC) to provide “at home” care not only for the frail or handicapped, but also for fit and active seniors, with 24/7 service.

Beth Protea, which began in 1992, operates at full occupancy, and the Home Care project was motivated by the limits in accepting the many applicants on its waiting list for accommodation.

A Case Manager visits each member once a week and a qualified social worker provides professional support where necessary. While one of the main goals is assisting and overcoming loneliness, boredom and helplessness, PHC also provides essential practical assistance such as meals, checking on adequate nutrition, attending to shopping, minor household repairs, laundry, an emergency call button and more.

In its initial stage, the project is aimed at English speakers in Kfar Shmaryahu, Herzliya Pituach, Herzliya, Ramat HaSharon and Ra’anana.

Germany Pledges $800 Million for Holocaust Survivors Home Care

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

The German government has agreed to significantly expand its funding of home care for infirm Holocaust survivors and relax eligibility criteria for restitution programs to include Jews who spent time in so-called open ghettos.

The agreement, reached after negotiations in Israel with the Claims Conference, will result in approximately $800 million in new funding for home care for Holocaust survivors from 2014 to 2017. This is in addition to $182 million for 2014 that already has been committed.

In 2015, the amount will rise by 45 percent, to approximately $266 million, and then to $273 million in 2016 and $280 million in 2017. Because the sums are set in euro, the actual amounts may change depending on currency fluctuations.

The $84 million increase in funding between 2014 and 2015 will represent the largest year-over-year increase since the program began with approximately $36.6 million in 2004, though a bigger percentage increase took place in 2010, when funding doubled from $68 million $136 million.

“With this new agreement, the Claims Conference will be able to both increase the number of beneficiaries, thus eliminating waiting lists of survivors for home care, as well as increase the number of hours per person to a minimum level of dignity,” Claims Conference board chairman Julius Berman wrote in a letter to the board.

Some 56,000 survivors are now receiving home care through the Claims Conference.

The announcement of new funding comes amid controversy for the Claims Conference over revelations related to bungled investigations in 2001 that failed to detect a broad fraud at the Holocaust restitution organization. A document obtained last week by JTA showed that top Claims Conference officials were involved in the botched probes, including then-executive vice president Gideon Taylor and Berman, who in 2001 served as outside counsel to the Claims Conference.

Claims Conference employee Semen Domnitser, a director of two restitution funds who was at the center of the 2001 inquiries, was found guilty earlier this month in federal court of masterminding the scheme, which ran up more than $57 million in fraudulent claims from 1993 until 2009. The cost of the fraud was borne entirely by Germany.

In his letter to the Claims Conference’s board announcing the result of the latest negotiations, former U.S. ambassador Stuart Eizenstat, who leads negotiations with Germany for the Claims Conference, hailed the work of executive vice president Greg Schneider, who along with a senior Claims Conference staffer discovered and stopped the fraud scheme in 2009.

“The lives of tens of thousands of Holocaust victims will be made easier in their old age due to Greg’s skill and vision,” Eizenstat wrote in his message to the board.

“This unprecedented amount of funding means that we can give Nazi victims around the world the aid that they desperately need as they grow more frail,” he said. “That the agreement encompasses funding through 2017 underscores the German government’s ongoing commitment to Holocaust survivors. It is all the more impressive because it comes at a time of budget austerity in Germany.”

In last week’s negotiations, which took place in Israel, Germany also agreed to relax eligibility criteria for the Central and Eastern European Fund and Article 2 Fund, through which the German government gives pension payments of approximately $411 per month to needy Nazi victims who spent significant time in a concentration camp, in a Jewish ghetto in hiding or living under a false identity to avoid the Nazis.

Until now, only those who were interned in closed-off ghettos were eligible for pensions. As of Jan. 1, 2014, pensions will be available also to those forced to live in any of 300 specific open ghettos, such as those in Czernowitz, Romania, where Jews lived under curfew, lost their jobs and were subject to persecution.

The session that just concluded was the first time since restitution negotiations with Germany began in Luxembourg in 1951 that talks were held in Israel. For decades, the negotiations were held only in the German capital. In recent years, sessions also were held in New York and Washington.

Before they began negotiating last week, German representatives met with survivors in Tel Aviv, Bnei Brak and Jerusalem, visiting private homes where survivors are receiving home care, a senior day center and a soup kitchen. They also took a guided tour of the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial and museum in Jerusalem. The negotiations were held in a classroom at Yad Vashem.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/germany-pledges-800-million-for-holocaust-survivors-home-care/2013/05/28/

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