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October 21, 2014 / 27 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Hosni Mubarak’

Egyptians Choose a President (Again)

Monday, May 26th, 2014

Egyptians are going to the polls today (Monday) and tomorrow to elect a president in what many see as a foregone conclusion. But the issue is not whether former Field Marshal and Defense Minister Abdel Fattah el-Sisi will be elected president – the issue is how many of Egypt’s 80 million citizens will actually turn out to vote.

El-Sisi, whose opponent was socialist activist Hamdeen Sabahi, was responsible for the June 30, 2013 removal of Egypt’s first democratically-elected president.

Former President Mohammed Morsi was backed by the Muslim Brotherhood and elected by a popular vote that many Egyptians said was rigged. The election followed the “January 25 Revolution” that toppled the decades-old regime of former President Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.

The “intervention” – as the subsequent military government called it – came in response to months of protests against the increasingly restrictive Islamist regime.

By June, millions of Egyptians had signed a petition asking the president to resign, and were flooding the streets in major cities around the country. But the streets ran with blood as the protesters clashed with their Muslim Brotherhood counterparts, who supported Morsi and claimed the entire scene was a setup by the military.

Now new elections have arrived and the question is whether the country will turn out to support el-Sisi — the military chief who seized the initiative to remove Morsi from office, attempted to restore order to Egypt and has since cooperated with Israel in trying to eliminate terrorist camps in Sinai.

Al Qaeda-Linked Terrorists Kill Three Egyptian Policemen in Sinai

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

Terrorists linked with Al Qaeda claimed responsibility for gunning down three Egyptian policemen in the Sinai Peninsula Sunday, attacking the policemen’s bus with rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns.

The Egyptian army responded through a message on Facebook, “We assure the Egyptian people of the great determination of its men to fight black terrorism and the complete elimination of the advocates of oppression and sedition and blasphemy from followers of the Muslim Brotherhood.”

The military regime in Egypt has branded the Muslim Brotherhood Public Enemy No. 1 and has linked it with virtually all terror that has plagued Egypt since the ouster of Muslim Brotherhood president Mohammed Morsi last year.

Saturday was the third anniversary of the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak, and at least 49 people were killed in battles, mostly with supporters of the Brotherhood. The Interior Ministry stated it arrested more than 1,000 “rioters.”

For those with short reminders, the Obama administration helped get rid of Mubarak and fostered close ties with the Muslim Brotherhood, which won post-Mubarak elections. Washington then figured out that maybe the Brotherhood was not so much better than Mubarak, if not worse, and backed Morsi’s ouster.

Then it backed the new military regime, headed by General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, expected to win the next election for president.

The current regime and Morsi share two things in common: violence and hatred of Israel.

Bloodbath Likely in Egypt on Next Week’s Anniversary of Revolution

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

An Egyptian government  official called on people to confront the Muslim Brotherhood “for a counter-revolution” and to celebrate on January 25 the anniversary of the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak.

Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim told an Egyptian television channel Wednesday, “I reiterate my call to the Egyptian people: you have to take to the streets on 25 January next to celebrate because we’ve discovered Muslim Brotherhood plots aiming to wreak havoc on that day with the help of some sports groups and by inducing some anti-military and anti-Brotherhood political forces.

“The Muslim Brotherhood and those forces plan to infiltrate Tahir Square through multiple axes by mobilizing about 15,000 young people to stir chaos and revive a counter-revolution to 30 June.”

The June 30 revolution refers to last year’s protests that ousted Muslim Brotherhood president Mohammed Morsi.

The revolts against Mubarak and Mori were met with brutal violence by the regimes. More than 2,000 people were killed and tens of thousands were injured.

More of the same can be expected next week.

Mubarak Free from Jail but Faces House Arrest

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Egyptian authorities released former president Hosni Mubarak from prison late Thursday afternoon but faces house arrest due to pending charges of corruption and involvement in the murders of hundreds of people whose protests helped oust him from office two years.

An Egyptian court freed him because he has been in jail for the maximum amount of time allowed prior to conclusion of a trial. He has been acquitted on one charge of corruption, and his trial for involvement in the murders has been recessed.

Another charge of corruption still awaits him.

Saudi King Says Muslims Ready to Fund Egypt if US Cuts Aid

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

Saudi Arabia said Monday that it and other Muslim countries are ready to bankroll Egypt to make up for any financial aid that the United States might cut.

“To those who have announced they are cutting their aid to Egypt, or threatening to do that, (we say that) Arab and Muslim nations are rich with resources, and will not hesitate to help Egypt,” Foreign Minister Prince

Saud Al-Faisal said in a statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency.

As reported earlier today, The office of Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), head of the Appropriations State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee, told The Daily Beast that military aid to Egypt has been temporarily cut off.

The downside for the United States would be that aid from the oil-rich Saudi kingdom would give it more influence on Cairo, at Washington’s expense.

Both countries share a disdain for the Muslim Brotherhood, which the new military regime ousted but has not been able to contain without the same brutal suppression exercised by Hosni Mubarak, before he was overthrown two years ago.

“Regrettably, we see that the stance of the international community toward the current events in Egypt is contrary to its stand toward the events in Syria,” Prince Saud was quoted as saying by the Saudi Gazette. “Where is its concern for human rights and the sanctity of blood in case of Syria where innocent civilians are being killed every day and where more than 100,000 people have been massacred so far?

“The international community adheres to human rights according to its interests and whims,” the foreign minister added.

He said that a cut in Western aid to Egypt would be considered a “hostile attitude against the interests of the Arab and Islamic nations and their stability.”

Mubarak to be Freed from Jail This Week, Says His Lawyer

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Hosni Mubarak, overthrown two years ago in the Arab Spring rebellion and jailed on charges of murder and corruption, will be freed from jail this week after being cleared of a charge of corruption, his lawyer Fareed el Deeb announced Monday, but murder charges still await him.

He added that one other charge of corruption remains open and that the case will be concluded later this week. “All we have left is a simple administrative procedure that should take no more than 48 hours. He should be freed by the end of the week,” Deeb said.

Mubarak’s two sons remain in jail, and the former dictator’s trial on charges of involvement in murder of protesters in 2011 is to resume next week.

 

 

Egyptian Army, Trying to Win Civil War in One Day, Kills Hundreds

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

Civil war broke out in at a least dozen cities in Egypt on Wednesday as Egyptian soldiers and police, backed by bulldozers and helicopters, carried out an offensive on pro-Mohammed Morsi protesters in an effort to put a brutal and quick end to the Muslim Brotherhood opposition’s sit-in protests.

As reported earlier, there are reports of up to 250 people dead and thousands of others wounded or arrested. The Muslim Brotherhood movement now claims the death toll is in the thousands

Whereas Syrian President Bassar al-Assad figured that ignoring the protest movement would break down the opposition, only to use uncivil force after protesters were able to organize, Egyptian authorities decided to use the same tactic as Hosni Mubarak three years ago and shoot at will to break down the opposition.

Mubarak ended up ousted and in jail. Morsi, his successor who was elected in democratic elections championed by President Barack Obama, is in virtual jail, “detained” by the army and held in a secret location.

If the army thought that the Muslim Brotherhood opposition would fall without Morsi, it was wrong. Dead wrong.

After several days of massive sit-ins that have virtually shut down Cairo, the army moved in at dawn. It succeeded in clearing out demonstrators near the Cairo University campus, but protesters used their biggest weapon – massive human resistance – in eastern Cairo, where massive violence was reported.

Clashes also broke out in Alexandria in upper Egypt, Mansoura, Suez, Giza and Rabaa.

Al Arabiya reported that soldiers are besieging the neighborhood of Islamist preacher Mohamed El-Beltagi, who faces charges of incitement and attempted murder. One of his daughters was killed.

In Alexandria, demonstrators set fire to a government building, protesters attacked four police stations in Giza, and eight people were killed in an attack on a police station in Abu Kurkas. Hundreds of demonstrators clashed with security forces and set public buses on fire.

In Rabaa,  British reporter Alistair Beach said he saw 42 bodies and tweeted, “Pro-Morsi protesters have barricaded themselves inside upper floors of field clinic as live fire crackles outside.” Three deaths were reported in Aswan, and a pro-Morsi crowd threw a security forces vehicle, with five people inside, off a bridge.

Protesters are using whatever guns they have, along with Molotov cocktails and rocks, to attack security forces.

Islamist mobs set fire to dozens of churches throughout the country. Pro-Morsi supporters set fire to a Christina youth center next to a Muslim youth center in the upper Egypt city of Fayoum, according to Al-Arabiya.

Live gunfire was reported in several cities, but Morsi supporters do not have the arms to match the automatic weapons that soldiers and police are firing to disperse crowds,

Regardless of whether the army wins the war in one day or it goes on endlessly, the violence is further evidence that the Obama administration’s campaign to make the Middle East safe for democracy, and vice versa, is not working.

All the United States and the entire international community can do is wring their collective hands and cry over the violence. Typically, the European Union issued a statement Wednesday that the violence is “extremely worrying,” and it called for restraint from Egyptian authorities.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/egyptian-army-trying-to-win-civil-war-in-one-day-kills-hundreds/2013/08/14/

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