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July 31, 2015 / 15 Av, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Hosni Mubarak’

Egypt vs. ISIS: Victory or Death

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

Egypt said it is in total control of the Sinai the day after massive and well-coordinated attacks by the Islamic State (ISIS) on army and police posts.

Israel’s Channel 2 television reported that Israel has given the green light to Egypt to bring in heavy weapons into the Sinai, as required under the 1979 peace treaty that paved the way for Israel to surrender the Sinai a decade after the Yom Kippur War.

Positioning heavy weapons in the Sinai always carries the risk they can be used against Israel, but for the time being, Israel is the last enemy on Egypt’s mind.

Egypt may have done Israel a big favor by demanding the Sinai, which for years has become a fiefdom of Bedouin criminals and graduated into a no man’s land open for grabs by Bedouin, Hamas, Muslim Brotherhood and now ISIS terrorists.

Israel remains on high alert while Egypt said it will not stop its counter-offensive against Sinai jihadists until all of them are “eliminated.”

The ISIS attacks yesterday killed between a dozen and nearly 100 Egyptian army officers, soldiers and policemen, depending on whom you want to believe.

The numbers do not matter because the attacks on 15 different posts proved that ISIS is a very organized army.

Egyptian bombing raids continued into the night following the wave of attacks that were aimed at cutting off Rafah and El-Arish, which would have created a critical threat to Israel.

The IDF immediately shut down border crossings at Egypt and Gaza after the ISIS offensive, but re-opened the Kerem HaShalom crossing Thursday morning to allow trucks into Gaza with foods and merchandise..

Egypt will “exterminate” every jihadist in the northern Sinai, said its military spokesman.

Brigadier General Mohamed Samir said:

We control the situation in Sinai 100%.

The army claimed it killed more than 100 jihadists.

The cabinet of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi Wednesday night approved urgent measures that call for “swift justice,” which can be translated as “don’t let democracy get in the way of survival.”

Four years after the rebellion against Hosni Mubarak, ostensibly because of his autocratic rule, his regime has been reincarnated.

Minister of Parliamentary Affairs and Transitional Justice Ibrahim Al-Heneidy said that In the absence of the parliament, Al-Sisi has legislative powers.

Coincidentally or not, ISIS attacked the day after terrorists killed Egypt’s state prosecutor Hisham Barakat, who was riding in a motorcade. Barakat had said that if former Muslim Brotherhood president Mohammed Morsi is sentenced to death, the execution will be carried out.

Heneidy said that terrorists will face harsher punishment, meaning execution or life in prison.

The death penalty also will apply to anyone who funds terror, a classification that puts Muslim Brotherhood officials on notice that Al-Sisi is bent on destroying the organization that ruled Egypt only one year ago.

The process of appeal also will be shorted. “Under the current law, defendants are allowed to appeal verdicts twice, but under the amended draft, this process will be shortened to give defendants the right to appeal the verdict just one time,” said Heneidy. Furthermore, if a higher court accepts an appeal, the regime will be able to call for a retrial in the Court of Cassation, whose decisions are final.

So what did the Arab Spring rebellion and the Obama administration achieve by getting rid of Mubarak?

If the State Dept. has learned that transplanting American democracy in the Muslim Middle East is like feeding Muslims ham and eggs during Ramadan, it was worth everything to teach Washington a lesson.

The odd are heavy that the State Dept. has not yet learned.

All-Out War South of Israeli-Sinai Border

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

The northern Sinai Peninsula south of the border with Israel is engulfed in an all-out war.

Egyptian F-16 warplanes attacked Islamic State (ISIS) and other jihadists’ positions for several hours Wednesday afternoon and killed more than 90 jihadists following massive ISIS attacks.

Most of the 70 Egyptian casualties were soldiers and policemen, and the death toll is not final.

Egypt retaliated immediately and fiercely, and Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu said:

Terrorism is knocking on our borders. ISIS is not only across from the Golan Heights, it is also in Egypt, across from Rafah…And we are together with Egypt and other states in the Middle East and the world in the struggle against extreme Islamic terror.

Together or not, Israel immediately closed crossings to Egypt and Gaza.

ISIS declared yesterday that it will wipe out both Hamas and Israel.

Egypt still is counting the bodies of those killed today while its jets bombed jihadi posts near Rafah and at Sheikh Zuweid, where ISIS had set siege to a police station earlier in the day.

The ISIS attacks may have finally woken up the regime of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to the fact that ISIS is no less a threat to Cairo than it is to Damascus and Baghdad.

ISIS assassinated Egypt’s state prosecutor two days ago.

The terrorist machine gave the world a hint Wednesday morning just how powerful and well-armed it is.

Terrorists used anti-tank rockets, assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades in the assault on 15 different army and police positions in a well-planned and calculated war on the regime that faces Al-Sisi with a bigger threat than even the Muslim Brotherhood, whose party he replaced in a de facto military coup last year.

ISIS also has anti-aircraft guns, some of which were destroyed n the Egyptian retaliation this afternoon.

Egypt has been in turmoil ever since the Arab Spring protests against Hosni Mubarak, who ousted was hastened by President Barack Obama, who in turn praised the Muslim Brotherhood and its leader Mohammed Morsi following his election.

A year later, Obama found himself once again encouraging the ouster of the president and praising Al-Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi , whose regime has been no less ruthless than Mubarak’s and Morsi’s.

With the alternative being anarchy, the United States and other powers have backed al-Sisi, but the Sinai has been virtually a province of anarchy for four years.

Hamas has been a serious threat to Egyptian control in the Sinai, next to the border with Israel, and the Gaza terrorist party and army have executed dozens of attacks against Egyptian forces.

ISIS making Hamas look like small potatoes.

‘Press Freedom’ Shows US-Backed Egyptian Regime is ‘Mubarak Number 3′

Thursday, June 25th, 2015

A New York-based group of journalists say there is an “unprecedented threat” to journalists in Egypt, where Obama backs the current regime.

The threat to journalists under Egypt’s regime of President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi is “unprecedented,” the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), warned Thursday.

President Barack Obama has backed the Al-Sisi regime after backing, and then turning his back, on Hosni Mubarak and then Mohammed Morsi of the terrorist Muslim Brotherhood party.

In a report filed by The Associated Press, the committee of journalists said that Egypt has imprisoned 18 news reporters , mostly for accusations that they are affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood.

“CPJ spoke to high-level officials, including the prosecutor-general and the minister of transitional justice, who denied that Egypt was holding any journalists in jail in relation to their work,” the group said. “But CPJ research shows that the government of el-Sisi … has used the pretext of national security to crack down on human rights, including press freedom.

One case cited is that of Mahmoud Abou-Zeid, arrested in August 2013 while taking photographs of the violent dispersal of a pro-Morsi protest where Al-Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi ‘s police and army killed hundreds of demonstrators.

The journalist still is in prison, but no charges have been filed.

Obama Has Remorse for Morsi

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

President Barack Obama is “deeply troubled” over yesterday’s death sentence to former Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, who led the Muslim Brotherhood’s violent rebellion against Hosni Mubarak and then wears thrown out of office for the same crimes as his predecessor.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said:

We are deeply troubled by the politically motivated sentences that have been handed down against former president Morsi and several others by an Egyptian court today. The United States has repeatedly raised concerns about the detention and sentencing of a variety of political figures in Egypt. We are concerned that proceedings have been conducted in a way that is not only contrary to universal values but also damaging to stability that all Egyptians deserve.

The death sentence actually was a confirmation of the same ruling previously delivered by an Egyptian court, which re-affirmed it Tuesday after its approval by the Grand Mufti. Morsi will appeal the ruling.

Morsi was convicted for murder and kidnapping during a massive jailbreak he helped organize in the uprising against Hosni Mubarak in 2011. He also was sentenced on Tuesday to 25 years in jail, which is considered “life” in the Egyptian courts, for espionage.

Mubarak was a ruthless autocrat who maintained stability with the usual Middle East Arab anti-democratic rule.

The Arab Spring protest movement, which was encouraged by President Obama, swept through Egypt, forced Mubarak out of office and was followed by American-backed elections that were democratic, but only by Egypt’s standards

The Muslim Brotherhood, which had been outlawed under the Mubarak regime, swept into power and was welcomed by Obama, whose office said at the time:

The United States will continue to support Egypt’s transition to democracy and stand by the Egyptian people as they fulfill the promise of their revolution He [Obama] emphasized his interest in working together with President-elect Morsi, on the basis of mutual respect, to advance the many shared interests between Egypt and the United States.

After it became clear that Morsi was Mubarak by a different name, only worse, and after his regime murdered, tortured and imprisoned thousands of protesters, Obama stated:

When I took a position that it was time for Egypt to transition [away from Hosni Mubarak in 2011], it was based on the fact that Egypt had not had democratic government for decades, if ever. And that’s what the people were calling for.

So why is Obama so troubled over the death sentence to Morsi and not death sentences for Palestinian Authority Arabs who sell land to Jews, or drug dealers and even those convicted for blasphemy and who are executed in Saudi Arabia?

And if he is so concerned that the death sentence was politically motivated, how about alleged spies for Israel who are hanged by Iran?

Or could it be that President Obama doesn’t want history to record that a man whom he once supported was sentenced to death for murder and terror?

Obama also has supported Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi who has turned out to be another version of Mubarak.

But it does not matter so long as the United States has declared there is democracy in Egypt.

Egypt Court Upholds Death Sentence for Morsi

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

An Egyptian court handed down two sentences to former president Mohammed Morsi Tuesday, first ordering him to prison for 25 years and then upholding a death sentences on separate charges.

“Life” in the Egyptian judiciary means 25 years.

The death sentence for plotting jailbreaks and attacks on police will spare Morsi from having to serve years in prison, but he still has the right to appeal and get his chance to stay in jail instead of being executed.

He was sentenced to “life” earlier in the day for espionage and conspiring with Hamas, Hezbollah and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards to destabilize the country.

Sixteen other Muslim Brotherhood officials were sentenced to death, and another 16 to “life” on Tuesday.

Morsi was elected in 2012 in elections that are suspected of having been rigged. The Obama administration welcomed the Muslim Brotherhood leader as the replacement for Hosni Mubarak, whose ouster was cheered by the American government.

Orange Telecom’s Troubled Egyptian History

Friday, June 5th, 2015

As CEO of French multinational telecommunications corporation Orange S.A. Stephane Richard was telling journalists in Cairo on Wednesday how happy he would be to cut ties with Israel, few outside Cairo were aware of the painful legacy of the mobile providers in Egypt and Orange in particular.

Back in 2011, when the Egyptian government under President Hosni Mubarak was cracking down on protesters in the big cities, suddenly the most effective means of communication activists had been using to coordinate action across the country—most prominently Facebook and Twitter—were unplugged.

As the Wall Street Journal reported four years ago, attempts to connect to websites belonging to Egyptian ISPs—EgyptWeb, TeData and Purenet—failed.

France Telecom, Orange’s original owner, confirmed that Egyptian authorities had taken “measures to block mobile phone services,” and apologized to the customers of Mobinil, the Egyptian Company for Mobile Services, of which Orange S.A. owns 98.92%.

Considering that Mobinil had an estimated 34 million Egyptian subscribers, it is clear why the name Orange was interchangeable with the idea of mobile phone service in Egypt, and why the betrayal, just when its services were needed the most, has left such deep-seated anger among Egyptians.

According to a Vodafone statement, mobile operators in Egypt were told “to suspend services in parts of Egypt. Under Egyptian legislation, the authorities have the right to issue such an order and we are obliged to comply with it.”

The mobile companies capitulated without even an attempt to stand up to the embattled dictator Mubarak.

Many in Egypt noted that, in 2009, when Iranian youth and intellectuals had taken to the streets, it took forever to get online, due to government trickery, but you eventually got your message through using Google’s DNS and VPNs. In Cairo, it was a complete shutdown.

Renesys, an Internet intelligence company, reported “the virtually simultaneous withdrawal of all routes to Egyptian networks in the Internet’s global routing table… an action unprecedented in Internet history.”

As luck would have it, eventually the Egyptian authorities ordered Orange’s arch-rival Vodafone to switch its network back on, so the secret service could send out unsolicited text messages.

At that point, Vodafone rediscovered its backbone, and announced that the Egyptian government had forced it to send pro-Hosni Mubarak text messages to their customers. Vodafone said it protested to the authorities that it finds these messages is unacceptable.

Regardless of whether or not that series of events actually caused the shift in that country’s telecom business, the fact is that, as of 2011, Vodafone has become the leader in Egypt’s telecom market, with the largest customer base and revenue share.

Stephane Richard is probably not the completely rabid anti-Semite some have made him up to be. As he himself admitted, for him, the move to unload Israeli customers is just business.

If Orange wants to reinvigorate its Egyptian business, it must first mend the bridges it burned four years ago.

And what better way to become the darling of Egyptian consumers once again than by dumping on Israel and capitalizing on Egyptian anti-Semitism.

Mubarak Sentenced to Three Years

Sunday, May 10th, 2015

In a retrial of his corruption case, former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak and his 2 sons have been sentenced to 3 years with no parole.

There’s a possibility that Mubarak may not have to serve any time, due to the amount of time he already served in jail.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/mubarak-sentenced-to-three-years/2015/05/10/

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