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Posts Tagged ‘IAEA’

IAEA Expert Killed in Road Accident in Iran

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

An International Atomic Energy Agency expert lost his life in a road accident in Iran on Tuesday, the Iranian Mehr News Agency reported.

According to the report, a car carrying two IAEA experts veered off the road and overturned.

One of the experts, who had South Korean nationality, died in the incident that occurred at about 12:00 a.m. local time Tuesday, near the Khondab complex in Markazi Province, which is located in western Iran.

Iran offered condolences to the family and colleagues of the expert at the IAEA.

Sovereignty and Suzerainty in The Israel-U.S. Relationship

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

The recent Obama-Netanyahu conclave has evoked much media speculation: Will Israel act unilaterally to attack Iran’s nuclear facilities? Does the Obama administration really have Israel’s back as the president indicated? And where is that “red line,” the point at which an attack must occur to prevent an Iran with “secure” nuclear weapons? Despite all the diplomatic bonhomie and announcements of solidarity, questions with uncomfortable implications remain.

U.S. officials made it clear that President Obama will not go beyond the broad policy enunciated in the past: that the United States is committed to preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon through diplomacy and sanctions and, as a last resort, force. Here too equivocation prevails. Secretary of Defense Panetta has indicated a reluctance to apply military force in this matter, and questioned the effectiveness of an Israeli strike, a position adopted by others in the administration.

By contrast, Prime Minister Netanyahu stated unequivocally that his primary responsibility as Israel’s political leader is to ensure that this Jewish state survives and remains the master of its own fate. But the U.S. holds many high cards in this poker hand. Several officials already suggested that should an unauthorized attack occur, the U.S. would not replenish the ordnance and advanced military technology Israel needs to maintain its superior military position in the Middle East.

These strains in the relationship may not seem apparent at the moment, but the difference in perspective will emerge on the political front in the next few months, if not sooner.

Even the U.N. – notably hostile to Israel – voiced concern that Tehran “might” be developing nuclear weapons. The International Atomic Energy Agency recently reiterated its concern that Tehran has tested intercontinental ballistic missiles that could be weaponized.

The threat and the ominous effects of an air attack against Iran, however, is the pull and tug of sovereignty versus suzerainty. Is Israel an independent nation free of American influence? Does the president of the U.S. have a veto over Israeli military actions? Or is Israel free of outside influences, a state enjoined by what it believes to be its self interest?

At the moment, both sides hedge. Israel wants U.S. support, but if it launches an attack, the Prime Minister will provide only 24 hours of prior notice. The Obama administration seemingly fears an Israeli assault, particularly the blowback from across the Arab world, but it is obvious that the United States cannot prevent this decision from being made. This is not a test of wills, but rather a test of interests and strategic perspective.

On at least one matter, there appears to be consensus: containment, of the kind that seemingly worked during the Cold War, is not applicable in this scenario, albeit that may be the United States’ default position. But it is clear, even to the bureaucrats in Foggy Bottom, that an Iranian nuclear weapon has political as well as military consequences. U.S. interests across the Middle East would be imperiled by the Persian bomb. Moreover, it is also clear that a “Japanese solution,” in which Iran has enough fissionable material to produce several bombs and ICBM’s to deliver them but doesn’t bring the two together, is not acceptable. Presumably, with the right applications, the ICBM’s could be weaponized in relatively short order — and every nation in the Middle East will find out what is in that Iranian tent.

Clearly it is better to see Israel and the U.S. move closer on this strategic issue than they were previously, but there is a nagging feeling that President Obama will say whatever is necessary to forge ties to Jewish wealth and the Jewish Democratic voting bloc. Does he mean what he says? Based on past public commentary, the jury is skeptically out. The next months, however, could shape the future of global affairs for decades.

 

Originally published by Stonegate Institute www.stonegateinstitute.org

IAEA Schedule Return Trip To Iran

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

In a statement released by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), another round of talks has been scheduled with Iran over the “possible military dimensions to Iran’s nuclear program.” The IAEA team of experts will return to Iran for the talks on February 21 for two days.

UN Nuclear Inspectors Plan Return Visit to Iran

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) announced on Wednesday that it plans to send another inspection team to Iran “in the very near future,” and indicated that progress has been made on obtaining greater transparency from Iran on its nuclear program.

Herman Nackaerts, deputy director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), told reporters upon landing in Vienna that  his inspection team “had three days of intensive discussions about all our priorities, and we are committed to resolve all the outstanding issues. And the Iranians said the are committed, too . . . But, of course, there’s still a lot of work to be done, so we have planned another trip in the very near future.”

When asked if he was satisfied with the three-day trip, Nackaerts said “yeah, we had a good trip,”  but he refrained from providing specifics.

 

Iran Invites IAEA Inspectors to Extend Stay

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi has offered to extend the three-day visit of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear experts, which was scheduled to end on January 31.

Iran sees their visit as an opportunity to dispel a recent IAEA report, which stated that Iran’s nuclear program very likely has a military dimension.

UN Nuclear Team Arrives in Iran

Sunday, January 29th, 2012

An International Atomic Energy Agency team of nuclear inspectors arrived in Iran on Sunday to investigate allegations of a nuclear weapons program.

The three-day visit could have a potentially significant influence on the West’s strategy for thwarting the weapons dimension of Iran’s nuclear program.

The team is expected to visit the underground enrichment site near the city of Qom, in which Iran recently said it had begun uranium enrichment work.

 

IAEA Chief on Iran: ‘What we know suggests the development of nuclear weapons’

Thursday, January 19th, 2012

Yukiya Amano, the International Atomic Energy Agency chief, said that Iran has failed to adequately refute accusations of a military dimension in its nuclear program, and insisted that it was his duty to warn the world of the threat Iran poses.

In an interview with Financial Times Deutschland, Amano said: “What we know suggests the development of nuclear weapons . . . We want to check over everything that could have a military dimension.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/iaea-chief-on-iran-what-we-know-suggests-the-development-of-nuclear-weapons/2012/01/19/

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