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December 20, 2014 / 28 Kislev, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘IBM’

IBM to Pay $1 Billion for Israeli Data Security Firm

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

IBM has agreed to acquire the Israeli data security firm Trusteer for an undisclosed sum that is believed to be up to $1 billion.

Trusteer, which has locations in Tel Aviv and Boston, develops software to help businesses protect themselves against financial fraud and security threats.

Upon the official closing of the deal, Trusteer will join the IBM Security Systems organization, IBM announced Thursday.

IBM, an American multinational technology and consulting corporation, is forming a cybersecurity software lab in Israel where Trusteer and IBM researchers will work on advanced software to address more complicated cyber threats.

This would be IBM’s largest ever acquisition in Israel, according to the Israeli business daily Globes. The purchase price is believed to be between $800 million and $1 billion.

Meanwhile, Apple has agreed to buy the Israeli start-up Matcha.tv, the website VentureBeat reported Tuesday.

Matcha, which shut down in May, is a second screen TV/video app that allows users to find out what shows are available on cable TV providers, streaming video services and digital video stores, and makes recommendations based on the user’s viewing habits.

The purchase price is believed to be between $1 million and $1.5 million.

IBM Buys Out Israeli Data Security Firm for $300-400 Million

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

IBM has announced it is buying up the Israeli data security company Trusteer for an undisclosed sum but which market analysts estimate is in the $300-400 million range. IBM said the purchase advances its investment in cloud-delivered software and services.

Trusteer provides software solutions to protect companies from financial fraud and security threats.

As part of this announcement, IBM is forming a cyber security software lab in Israel that will bring together more than 200 Trusteer and IBM researchers and developers to focus on mobile and application security, advanced threat, malware, counter-fraud, and financial crimes. This lab is an addition to IBM’s existing research and development facilities in Israel.

Trusteer has offices in Boston and Tel Aviv and says its software can identify security threats that can be missed by traditional security software. Most of the top 10 American and British banks use Trusteer software, which helps ensure that banking customers can safely transfer money on a mobile device.

What Israel Did for IBM and What IBM Did for Israel

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

Doug interviews Meir Nissensohn, former general manager of IBM in Israel. Mr. Nissensohn explains why IBM came to Israel, what investment opportunities Israel offers to large, multinational companies and what these companies can give to Israel in return. Also find out why Israel has so many startup companies and why businesses and the Israeli economy continue to prosper on the second part of this week’s Goldstein on Gelt podcast.

IBM Haifa Developing Real-Time Shopping App

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

IBM in Haifa is developing a a new augmented-reality mobile shopping app to enable retailers to personalize customers’ shopping experiences from their smart phones and tablets.

The new app will allow users to scan store shelves to receive personalized product information, coupons, and recommendations as they shop.

The app will also allow users to customize their profiles according to factors that matter to them most – such as the cost, inclusion of an allergenic or undesired ingredient, or biodegradable packaging, and will provide prices, review, discounts, and even reviews by friends accessed through the user’s social networking memberships.

Haifa’s IBM Research lab aims to give in-store shoppers the same amount of real-time product details online shoppers have.

The app will also provide retailers with information about consumers, enabling them to better stay in touch with their likes and dislikes, and will help them build brand loyalty by providing coupons and membership benefits.

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities – 2/25/11

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Stand-Up Guy’s Colorful Plea  (Chronicles Feb. 11) Evokes Reader Sentiment

 

Dear Stand-Up Guy,

Thanks to the tremendous wealth of Jewish literature available today, I rarely find myself reading The Jewish Press over Shabbos. On occasion, however, I skim through the Family Issues section looking for something of interest, and boy, did I find something. Never have I been one to voice my opinions to the editor, but seeing your letter inspired me to crawl out of my shell of anonymity and tell the world what I think.

In most mainstream yeshivos and Bais Yaakovs great importance is placed on uniformity. The Bais Yaakov school I went to aimed to diminish any shred of self-expression or individuality by implementing a strict uniform code; girls who deviated even slightly saw swift consequences. The imposed uniformity did not sit too well with a girl like me whose nature is open-minded, spirited and inquisitive.

My parents gave me great experiences growing up — museums, traveling, introducing me to the arts; therefore, I learned to love creative expression through art and writing. My school seemed bothered that I was not “the same” as others in my grade. I was not the same white shirt, cookie-cutter kind of girl who had no passion, no opinions, without a sense of individuality. They wanted girls to not only look the same, but also BE the same. But who’s to say that someone who expresses himself or herself differently is a lesser person? Choice of dress has no bearing on one’s observance of Torah and mitzvos. The most ehrliche and G-d fearing bochur in yeshiva may very well be the guy in the pink, purple or even the polka dot shirt.

Since when does one’s choice of creative expression tarnish his soul? Being frum doesn’t mean looking like everyone else. Being frum means being sincere. I became extensively involved with kiruv rechokim to try and reverse the negative assumptions that nonaffiliated Jews have about yiddishkeit and religious people. I have a Masters in education so that I could be at the forefront of Jewish chinuch. So that I could teach Yiddishe kinderlach that whatever shirt they have on, the most important thing is to be kind, honest, generous people, to love Hashem and to love everyone.

The menahel recently called to offer me a teaching position in the same school which tried to stop me from being the person I wanted to be. Whatever your convictions, they make you who you are. Hang on to them; don’t let go. Being the better person doesn’t mean always fitting in.

I’ll go out on a limb here, Stand-Up Guy: Your letter affected me. I appreciate what you wrote and I thank you for taking the time to read my words. I would be so honored to go on a date with you. Things come together in mysterious ways, and trust me, Hashem looks out for even those of us wearing pink shirts.

Sincerely,

Stand-Up Girl

 

Dear Stand-Up Girl,

We are honored to have provided the impetus for your motivation to come out of your shell and give voice to your strong conviction. And we can hardly argue that being a mensch comes before anything else.

Hopefully, Stand-Up Guy is reading this and will be in touch, for as you say, things come together in mysterious ways.

Good luck!

 

Dear Rachel,

Today I read your column about clothes and I thought I would write to you about my problem.

I have a 26-year old son named David.  David is very smart. He went to Brooklyn Tech and then on to Carnegie Mellon, one of the top Engineering Schools in the US. At Carnegie Mellon he became religious and when he graduated IBM recruited him.

He now works for IBM in Haifa and is looking for a wife. David was raised in a secular home and since he came from the US wants a wife to whom he can speak English because that is his primary language. He has a good job, just purchased an apartment that he will move into in July/August and he has his own car.

He is also in the IDF Navy until July/August – so he does not have much free time until then.

I wonder if you know any religious young lady here in the USA who would not mind moving to Haifa to meet, marry and raise a family with my son.

With the miracle of computers, I can send you a photo of him. When I visit him in Israel he is the ONLY person in his shul who does not wear a black hat. He has a brown one.

And if you know someone in Israel who is willing to move to Haifa, that would be okay too.

I will gladly pay the matchmaker fee or make a donation to help agunot. Thanks!

Matchmaker Dad

 

Dear MD,

Though you refer to your issue as a problem, there doesn’t seem to be any. Your son is 26-years young and all indications are that he has a bright future ahead of him.

Your request is an uncommon one for this column, but the sincerity of a father’s heart has moved us to post your message.

Should anyone be interested in finding out more about David – we even have a photo of a handsome young man to pass along – please write to this column at Rachel@JewishPress.com. (Serious inquiries only!)

May you realize your longing and may your noble quest lead to loads of Yiddish nachas.

* * * * *

We encourage women and men of all ages to send in their personal stories via email to  rachel@jewishpress.com  or by mail to Rachel/Chronicles, c/o The Jewish Press, 4915 16th Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11204. If you wish to make a contribution and help agunot, your tax-deductible donation should be sent to The Jewish Press Foundation. Please make sure to specify that it is to help agunot, as the foundation supports many worthwhile causes.

True Role Models (Part Thirteen)

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2005

This is the 13th part of a series on Aliyah and Klita (absorption) stories of American Jews who came to Israel for ideological and religious reasons in the past years. The purpose of the series is to emphasize the quality of the early olim to Israel and to tell the stories of these true role models for American Jewry.

I once thought that my study of logic would prepare me to understand how the world behaves. Living in Israel these past months has cured me of this assumption.

The logic of freeing 500 terrorists escapes me. For a majority of the right wing Likud party to vote to give away hard-fought-for territory and to transfer their own citizens from their property and homes in order to get nothing in return from their sworn enemy but “promises” – which these right-wing leaders themselves understand to be empty promises – is beyond understanding.

To continue the process, knowing that no matter how much you give away, the enemy will not be satisfied, as we have already heard on the news this morning, is beyond comprehension. Yet, we endure and pray and know that a day will come when a majority of reasoning and believing Jews will come from the Diaspora to Israel in order to out-vote those who no longer have any faith or self-respect. We are here, and here we will remain!

Shalom Cohen grew up in Kew Gardens Hills, Queens and Fruma (Faith Elfenbein) grew up in Woodmere. Shalom spent many summers in Bnei Akiva’s Camp Moshava and grew up knowing that Israel is the Jewish homeland. Faith joined Bnei Akiva in high school and quickly internalized its teachings and ideology. The year after graduating high school, Shalom and Fruma took part in Bnei Akiva’s year long Hachshara program working and living on a kibbutz in Israel.

When the Hachshara year ended, they returned to Queens College. After they married in 1982, they continued living in Queens where they were Bnei Akiva youth leaders. Meanwhile, Faith earned her Master’s degree in teaching English as a Second Language.

Two years later, Shalom and Faith became Bnei Akiva emissaries to South Florida. For two years, they lived in North Miami Beach and while Shalom worked during the day as a computer programmer, Faith stayed home with their newborn baby and ran the Bnei Akiva office and planned its activities from their home.

In 1986, Shalom and Fruma made aliya to Kibbutz Ein Hanatziv in Emek Beit Shean. For 11 years, they lived a happy and fulfilling life on the Kibbutz with their growing family. Ein Hanatziv has a very Israeli atmosphere, and Shalom and Fruma integrated into Israeli culture and language.

Shalom worked in the dairy barn (with its 400 cows) and Fruma worked in the children’s houses and then went to teach English in the regional school.

In 1997, with mixed emotions, the Cohens left Kibbutz and moved to a Yishuv, Hashmonaim. There they found many warm and caring friends and neighbors. Their children totally adjusted to the independent life style. Today, Shalom works as a Network Administrator for the Central Bureau of Statistics of the Israeli government and Fruma teaches English in junior high school.

The Cohen’s daughter, Mazalit, 20, finished two years of Sherut Leumi (national service), one year working for Bnei Akiva in Ginot Shomron and the second year as a counselor for the American girls’ program in Midreshet Harova in the Old City.

Zamir, 18, is completing 12th grade and is busy exploring his different options for army service beginning next year. He has been an active member of the volunteer police for two years.

Yonit, 17, is finishing 11th grade and is busy with her matriculation tests. Ayal is in 8th grade and Achva is in 5th grade. All the children take an active part in the youth activities in the Yishuv and are socially welcoming to the many children of new families that come to live in Hashmonaim every year.

The Cohens are a family that believes that living in Israel is a Mitzvah that cannot be distinguished from any other Mitzvah. It is no less important than keeping Kosher or observing Shabbat. Raising children in Israel without the benefit of close by grandparents is a big disadvantage, but this is the land of the Jews, and this is where they belong!!

* * *

Benjy Weiss came on Aliyah in 1967, after many years as a Bnei Akiva member and leader. Before coming to Israel, Benjy was a staff member at the IBM, T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights.

In Israel, Benjy joined the faculty at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and he became a full professor in 1974. In 1973, Benjy married Bracha Shkolnik and they have six children, all of whom live in Israel. Their three eldest children are married and have produced several grandchildren. Benjy and Bracha’s youngest child is in her second year of army service.

In 2000, Benjy received a rare honor when was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as a Foreign Honorary Member. Like many of his fellow American olim, Benjy left behind his family, a great career and an excellent salary in order to tie his destiny in with the Jews of Israel.

* * *

Steve and Mindy Frankel made aliyah as part of Garin Matityahu to Kibbutz Be’erot Yitzchak in May of 1976. Steve and Mindy were active for many years in Bnei Akiva. Steve is a Brooklyn College graduate who studied political science, and Mindy has a BS in education, also from Brooklyn College. Steve went to Israel with a volunteer mission during the Yom Kippur War with 100 other Bnei Akiva members from the USA and Canada. In 1971, Mindy attended the Bnei Akiva Hachshara in Kibbutz Yavne.

After coming to Israel, Steve was asked to be the Madrich of the Hachshara in Israel from 1981 to 1984. In 1985, Steve and Mindy and their family left kibbutz and moved to Neve Tzuf. Three years later, they moved to the Hashmonaim settlement as the 35th family. Steve is presently the Israel program director for the United States and Canadian Bnei Akiva and the director of the American program “Mach Hach” in Israel. Mindy teaches English in the Ulpana in the new city of Modiin. They have four children, two of whom are married. One is a soldier in Hesder and their youngest will become a soldier in March. They have one grandson.

They feel that they gave up absolutely nothing to live in Israel, but rather have gained by living here far more than anything they could have had in the Diaspora. There is nothing more natural for them and for all Jews than to live at home.

True Role Models (Part Four)

Wednesday, December 29th, 2004

This is the fourth part of a series on Aliyah and Klita (absorption) stories of American Jews who came to Israel for ideological and religious reasons in the past years.

I remember my first visit to Israel in 1956. I was attending the first American Bnei Akiva Hachshara training program in Israel. We traveled by ship for two weeks until we finally landed in Haifa.

In those days, everyone was a pioneer and a friend. I vividly recall several incidents while I was hitchhiking around the country. Once, I was hitchhiking from Ashdod to Tel Aviv. A taxi stopped and as I was explaining that I could not afford a taxi, the driver said, “Hop in, I’m not asking you for money. I would like some company on my to Tel Aviv.”

Another time I was lost in Ramat Gan, searching for my Israeli cousin’s apartment where I was to stay for Shabbat. From a nearby porch someone asked what the problem was, and when I explained he said, “It should be nearby, but if you don’t find him, come to our house for Shabbat.” Another time, we were hitchhiking toward Eilat. As night was falling, some workers picked us up. They insisted that we spend the night in their moshav. The next morning, they asked that we stay for a bris because they were going to slaughter a sheep in honor of the bris. It was a different time and a different world.

* * *

Naftali and Evelyn (nee Offenbacher) Stern came on Aliya in 1966, five months after their wedding. Naftali received a degree in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern U. in Boston. He was a packaging engineer for Raytheon working on space modules for the NASA flights and for Bendix Electronics, which built air-to-air missile for the United States Air Force. He left behind a chance to make a great deal of money.

In Israel, Naftali did electronic packaging and then ran the Calibration labs at Rafael Industries. He serves today as a consultant in Quality Assurance and Metrology. Seven years ago, he received a Masters degree in Quality Assurance from the Haifa Technion.

Evelyn was a teacher in the United States. In Israel, she studied to be a librarian and has been working at the Mathematics Library in the Technion for over 25 years. Today, she is in charge of the Library.

Naftali and Evelyn raised a family of three girls in Israel. Their oldest daughter, Rachel, lives in Psagot. She is the mother of six and has her own business called “Racheli Itzuvim” – designing different types of Judaica. Their second daughter, Elana, has been a special education teacher for 15 years and is the mother of four. The youngest daughter, Nava, is the Quality Assurance manager at the National Virological Lab at Tel Hashomer Hospital.

* * *

Jay Shapiro graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with an MSc in physics and has held technical and management positions with the US Army Ordnance Corps, Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and General Electric Space Systems Division (GESD) before moving to Israel in 1969 to work at Israel Aircraft Industries. He worked in administration on the Lavi project and was Contracts Manager of the Helicopter Systems Program.

Jay has participated in scores of successful proposal efforts including the Night Targeting System (NTS), a combined program for the US Marine Corps and the Israel Air Force, which was the first prime contract for a major weapon system between the U.S. government and an Israeli-led international industrial team.

Since 1994, he has been the General Manager of Erno Contracting Associates, a consulting firm dealing primarily with contracting with the U.S. government. His firm also deals with drafting patents for the United States Patent Office, and with translation of technical documentation from Hebrew to English.

* * *

Pesach (Paul) and Debbie Rogoway gave up a lot to come to live in Israel, and they lost a son here in a car accident, but they do not regret for one moment moving from the “Gan Eden” of Monsey to a two and a half-room apartment in Haifa.

Pesach graduated from Yeshiva College where he majored in mathematics and served in his junior year as Editor-in-Chief of The Commentator. He was then hired by Ramo-Wooldridge, now part of TRW, for a pioneering programming assignment in guided missile flight simulation. He advanced rapidly and was a member of the team that developed the extremely popular PL/I programming language, and later joined IBM where he became, at the age of 28, a Senior Programmer, the highest technical level in IBM. He served in many senior positions and won a prestigious Outstanding Contribution Award for his PL/I development role.

Pesach, originally from Seattle, and his wife Debbie, from LA, met at the Bnei Akiva Moshava in California and married in 1956. They spent a year on Kibbutz Shluchot in 1958-9, returned to the USA, and moved from L.A. to Monsey, where they and their five children lived in a 13-room home on a huge parcel of wooded land.

Those in the know say that Pesach was undoubtedly destined to be a Vice President at IBM, but after the Six Day War, he and Debbie decided it was time to make aliyah. In 1968, they sold their home in Monsey and moved to Haifa, where Pesach became Manager of Elbit Computer’s Software Division. He held several senior management and technical positions in software engineering in Israel.

He later joined Motorola Israel where he founded two successful software development departments, served as Chief Software Engineer, and rose to become Motorola Corporate Director of Software Quality Standards for the entire Motorola worldwide company until 2000, when he took early retirement. While at Motorola, Pesach was responsible for bringing millions of dollars worth of software development projects to Israel.

Pesach is a retired Member of Motorola’s Science Advisory Board Associates (SABA), and is the winner of Motorola Outstanding Impact Awards for contribution to the ISO 9000-3 revision project and the ISO/IEC 15504 project. He now serves as a consultant to companies in Israel and elsewhere in the areas of systems and software process improvement including training, assessment and coaching.

Pesach serves on various international committees and working groups in areas such as systems and software life cycle models, capability assessment, technology and tools, and process improvement. He is Israel’s delegate to several international software standards organizations, including those responsible for ISO/IEC 15504 (SPICE) and ISO 9000-3. He is a founder and chairperson of the Israel Software Process Improvement Network (ISPIN).

Pesach and Debbie live in Petach Tikva, and their children and tens of grandchildren all live in Israel. Debbie worked for many years as a bookkeeper, and has now dedicated her life to her family and to helping many needy friends in the community. Pesach is a member of the Board of Directors of the Yeshiva University Israel Alumni Association and a founder of a computerized Bet Medrash project, which is in the advanced planning stage.

Today, Pesach and Debbie live in a Petach Tikva penthouse, with a pool and Shabbat elevator. Despite his daily stress and total dissatisfaction with the ethical level and irrationality of Israel’s government and the seriously clouded Zionist dream that the government represents, he and his wife feel that they have really made a difference through their way of living. Pesach and Debbie are confident that their commitment and ideas will win out in the end, because, after all, Hashem is on their side.

(To Be Continued)

Comments may be sent to dov@gilor.com

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/true-role-models-part-four/2004/12/29/

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