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August 22, 2014 / 26 Av, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘ID’

PA Arab Caught with Perfectly Forged Israeli ID

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Police patrolling the Ashkelon Beach region arrested a Palestinian Authority Arab with a perfectly forged Israeli ID card (Teudat Zehut), according to the Ashkelon Beach Regional spokesperson, Diti Horvitz-Arad.

On Sunday, police were on regular patrol, looking for Palestinian Authority Arabs who had infiltrated without proper permits.

Two weeks ago, off-duty soldier Tomer Hazan was killed by a Palestinian Authority Arab who did not have proper entry or work permits. His employer in Bat Yam claimed the killer had proper documentation.

Police came across 3 Arab workers in the village of Nitzan who they proceeded to question.

Two of them pulled out their Palestinian Authority IDs, but without entry or work permits. The third accidentally pulled out two IDs, which he then tried to hide.

Police were surprised to discover that the third man had two IDs, and a further check led them to discover that the Israeli ID was a perfect forgery.

If he hadn’t pulled out both IDs at the same time, police would have thought he was a proper Israeli citizen, based on a visual scan of his ID card.

All three Arabs were arrested.

 

 

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities

Sunday, July 22nd, 2012

A Reader’s Compelling Argument:
Is Dor Yeshorim obligated to release one’s lost ID number?

Dear Rachel,

My name is Sholom and I’d like to share with you my ongoing experience with Dor Yeshorim. I believe strongly in my position but I would appreciate a reasoned response from a dissenting point of view.

I took the Dor Yeshorim test last year together with my friend. I lost my ID number. As you probably know, Dor Yeshorim is a genetic testing program to determine genetic compatibility between potential shidduchim. Test results are not disclosed but rather a unique ID number is attached to the file and given to the tested.

In addition to this number, the file contains some bits of personal information, such as home phone number (from which you must call to check compatibility), date of birth, gender and time and place of testing.

If the ID number is lost, Dor Yeshorim’s policy mandates a new test be taken; there is no way they will disclose any information without the ID number present. If I provide my phone number (and call from that number), as well as my date of birth, gender and date and location the test was administered, and all these pieces of information collectively only match one file, then what doubt could exist that this file is mine?

Certainly no reasonable doubt, and I believe none at all, but still Dor Yeshorim insists this is too risky and they are not comfortable going by this, which brings me to my next point: I have autonomy. If DY is not comfortable skydiving, I may skydive. If DY is not comfortable with this “risk,” which in my opinion is non-existent, why should they be allowed to impose upon me? If all my information matches only one file and I am prepared to shoulder the responsibility from here on in, so why then should DY make such a decision for me? This decision should be mine to make.

Lastly, and I would like to hear a rabbinic response to this, I believe that DY is obligated to return my number which has the status of a lost object after I provide two identifying signs. Any ideas on how I could convince Dor Yeshorim legally or rabbinically to release my ID number would be very appreciated.

Thanks for reading and looking forward to hearing any response.

Fairness in numbers

Dear Fairness,

The way we understand it, Dor Yeshorim runs a tight ship and has upheld its rules since the day of its inception in the 1980s. One rule put in place specifies that a person who loses his or her identification number will need to be retested. The entire system is based on anonymity and DY can therefore not connect one with his or her test result file without that vital ID number.

Even if, as you say, you can provide your phone number, date of birth, etc., technically an individual other than you can be in possession of all of this personal information and pose as you. Remote as this may actually be, it seems that the rules instituted by this organization are ironclad and not meant to be broken.

Still and all, your argument is a most persuasive one. Since this column submits to being neither a speaking head for Dor Yeshorim nor a rabbinical authority in any sense of the term, readers are welcome to contribute their views on this young man’s delicate quandary.

Refraining from Vaccinating our Children against Chickenpox: Prudent or ill advised?

Dear Rachel,

My 10-month old recently came down with a full-blown case of chickenpox, and while I was trying to be vigilant in not having it spread to other children, I was floored by how many moms commented that they wished their children would catch it. This is one of those infectious diseases children receive immunizations for (my older children have been vaccinated), yet these moms do not allow their tots to receive this protection. (The vaccine is not administered to babies in their first year of life.)

I questioned one mother about her attitude and her take was that she felt safer with her children contracting chickenpox rather than being injected with lab-induced chemicals. She argues that we’ve all had the chickenpox as kids and survived it.

Meet Josh Mandel, Rising Ohio Jewish GOP Rock Star

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

Meet Josh Mandel, who won the Ohio GOP primary and will take on Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, in the fall. A new-age GOP, his fiscal policy comes down to this: he says the country needs to undertake “sweeping regulatory reform.”

Mandel, 34, has been compared to the other dashing, young conservative, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.. Next week, Rubio is coming to Ohio to campaign with Mandel. “This guy is the real story coming out of Ohio,” one longtime GOP consultant in the state tells me. “He’s the rock star of the party.”

He has a serious battle ahead, against incumbent Brown, who holds a double-digit lead over the former Marine in polls. But he is not discouraged.

Brown will “still be beating us in the polls probably through the summer, maybe even into the early fall,” Mandel said. “The only poll we care about is Election Day and on Election Day, we’re going to win. He has an advantage in that he’s got great name ID. His name ID, his name recognition, is in the mid-90s. He also has a significant disadvantage in that everyone knows who he is but still less than half the people want to rehire him. Our challenge, our main obstacle, is building up our name recognition, getting known throughout the state of Ohio.”

The Atlantic’s Molly Ball asked what makes Mandel think he’s ready to be a U.S. senator. She reports: “Mandel looks me gravely in the eye” and responds:

“The Constitution,” he says, pausing for effect, “says that you have to be 30 years old. And I think the people who wrote the United States Constitution had a wisdom about them that was very special, and a vision for America that should be appreciated.”

Another long pause. “I served two tours in Iraq? In the Marine Corps?” he says. “I’m the treasurer of the state of Ohio, where, when the United States credit rating was downgraded for the first time in American history, and 14 government funds around the country were downgraded, we earned the highest rating we could earn on our $4 billion investment fund. Where we navigated the European sovereign debt crisis with a yield, rather than a significant loss like so many other — er, unlike so many other — a loss — you know what I’m trying to say. With a yield rather than a loss, when so many other corporations and organizations and governments lost money around the country.”

Mandel is a strong supporter of Israel. He and his wife Ilana were married in Jerusalem in 2008.

Mandel was a member of AIPAC at the Ohio State University. In 2008, he attended the 2008 AIPAC Policy Conference in Washington, D.C, where he gave an address, and was quoted as saying “It was inspiring, the young people so motivated and gung ho about strengthening the Israel-United States relationship…Israel is our best friend and ally in the Middle East and it’s important that we maintain a strong and lasting relationship with them.”

At that conference, Mandel stated Iran was a threat, and discussed his divestment initiatives as a legislator in Ohio.

In February 2009, during Operation Cast Lead, the Israeli government issued a statement thanking Mandel for his support of the operation.

In May 2009, Mandel was a panel participant at the 2009 Awards and Installation Dinner held by the World Alliance for Israel PAC in the Los Angeles area.

In 2010 the OhioDaily obtained a copy of a letter sent to then Republican Treasurer candidate Josh Mandel from Canton, Oh. Rabbi Leah Herz, who scolded the young Mandel for race-bating:

Mr. Mandel, I do not question your heroism, and like all decent Americans I applaud your sacrifices while serving in our military.  As a Rabbi however, I say, “shame, shame” on the way you have behaved.  You are not a Nice Jewish Boy.

OK, so not everybody loves him…

Court clears Orthodox Jew for not carrying ID on Sabbath

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

(JTA) – An Orthodox Jew was found not guilty by a Hague appeals court of failing to produce an ID card on the Sabbath.

The man had faced a fine of nearly $200 for failing to prove his identity when requested to do so by police under a Dutch law.

Orthodox Jews are not permitted to carry any objects in a public place on the Sabbath.

The Hague appeals court ruled last week that the man’s religious requirement was more important than the law, according to Dutch News, citing the Telegraaf.

According to the newspaper, the minister who introduced the law was told at the time that it would present problems for Orthodox Jews, and he said then that it should be taken into account when the law was put into practice.

The public prosecutor could appeal the ruling.

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities – 8/12/11

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Dear Rachel,

I would like to write about a subject that affects many people who give tzedakah. As you are aware, Chinese auctions have become a very popular way for all types of organizations to raise funds. I confess, I am a Chinese auction junkie and put tickets into all the auctions that come my way.

Recently, however, I have been very turned off by some of these very worthy organizations. You see, because these are not-for-profit charities, they do not fall under the auspices of the “do not call list.” Thus, I am inundated with phone calls from many different charity organizations at all hours of the day.

Lately, some of these organizations have taken to using an automated phone system so that calls ring in our homes without letup.  This is what prompted me to write to you. One organization that ran an auction recently called me EVERY SINGLE DAY of the week leading up to the drawing, once even as late as 11:00 pm. But they didn’t stop there — they called my house phone and cell phone and continued to call even after I removed my name from its call lists.

I consider this type of solicitation abusive, aggressive, totally uncalled for and bordering on harassment. These people are also taking advantage of their not-for-profit status. I am so turned off that I have decided that any organization that calls me will be put on my “black list.”

I imagine I am not the only one annoyed by all these phone calls. Please print this letter so that administrators in charge of these fundraisers will hopefully be made aware that they are irritating the public.

Repeated automated calling, especially when one has already donated, will have the opposite of the intended effect. It’s a shame to lose donors on account of these bothersome reminders of “the big drawing.”

No longer donating to telemarketing charities

 

Dear No Longer,

This column cannot speak on behalf of organizations that resort to automated fund-raising in achieving their goal. But should someone reading this qualify as a spokesperson for one, we would certainly welcome his or her input.

There are plenty of opinions, however, at the other end. While reactions vary from person to person (some people can deal with automated calls better than others), too many to count feel victimized and are as peeved as you are at this uncalled for intrusion into their lives.

I’ve personally witnessed homebound senior citizens, both male and female, married and widowed, hounded by phone solicitors. Even a personal voice can be exasperating (sometimes more so, as the automated call can be more easily terminated), when an elderly man living on a fixed income is pressured into making a pledge against his will and better sense (and then eats his heart out about it).

Speaking of pledges, I know of one married homemaker who simply can’t say no to a pleading voice and, as a result, had a rude awakening. When she tried to make good on all her outstanding pledges before the onset of a new year, she realized that their budget was stretched beyond its limit and that their ma’aser (required percentage of income set aside for charitable contributions) had more than maxed out.

Her husband, in a quandary and none too pleased with his wife’s zealous generosity, sought advice from his Rav — who ruled that her pledges need not be honored. The well-respected community leader furthermore emphasized that a woman dependant on her husband’s income is not to dole out tzedakah on a whim, and that any woman finding herself alone when a solicitor comes-a-calling is not obligated to make any donation, period. (If she can and wishes to, the amount should not exceed the sum of $5.00.)

To expand on this last bit of sage counsel, if we may: a woman finding herself alone at home should best not heed the ringing doorbell altogether, especially after dark. If need be, an unexpected visitor can easily identify him/herself via a simple cell phone call.

As for this couple, the wife was additionally advised to make a hataras nedarim (annulment of vows). It would be surprising if all of this didn’t impact negatively on this household’s shalom bayis.

Where Chinese auctions are concerned, there may be a question as to whether the “shopping” one is coaxed into doing by the lavishly illustrated brochures actually qualifies as charity. It may all depend on whether one is browsing the catalogue with the sole aim of giving tzedakah, or merely surrendering to a desire to own some of the featured luxurious items. (Obviously, this is something one must discuss with one’s own rav.)

Back to the automated caller, let’s face it: if this hasn’t proven to be a worthwhile gambit, the practice would be waning by now rather than picking up momentum. Those who cannot tolerate this nuisance can simply choose to ignore the ringing phone when the ID display is unfamiliar (or familiar as one of those annoying callers).

Eleven o’clock at night is outrageous and inexcusable. A practical solution to this would be to silence the ringer for the duration one wishes not to be disturbed. (Generally speaking, it is prudent not to place calls to others past the hour of 10:00 p.m.)

Those of us who don’t have a money tree growing in our backyard can compile a list of charities we consider worthy of our ma’aser, and of course we always have the option of tossing those fancy auction catalogues in the recycle bin directly upon receiving them.

Above all, let’s keep in mind that “charity begins at home.” Our children’s (or grandchildren’s) schar limud counts as legitimate ma’aser expenditures, and alleviating the burden of close kin suffering an economic meltdown takes precedence over other causes.

Thank you for offering us the opportunity to discuss this matter which is of no small significance.

May we be worthy of Hashem’s compassion in providing us with the means to be self-sufficient, as well as to help others.

* * * * *

We encourage women and men of all ages to send in their personal stories via email to  rachel@jewishpress.com  or by mail to Rachel/Chronicles, c/o The Jewish Press, 4915 16th Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11204. If you wish to make a contribution and help agunot, your tax-deductible donation should be sent to The Jewish Press Foundation. Please make sure to specify that it is to help agunot, as the foundation supports many worthwhile causes.

The Gift Of Life

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

   Our 18-month-old son, Ezra, has a rare primary immune deficiency called Hyper IgM Syndrome. His body is unable to produce certain antibodies to protect him from infection. Thankfully, he has been doing well with the medical treatments that he receives. However, serious complications can arise and the prognosis is unclear. A bone marrow or stem cell transplant is the only cure. His doctors recommend a transplant provided a suitable donor can be found. Right now there is no donor in the registry that is a perfect match to Ezra. We are starting a campaign to find his perfect match and we need your help.

 

   The Gift of Life, a non-profit organization, maintains a registry of potential bone marrow donors. A simple cheek swab test is all that is needed to determine someone’s tissue type and to enter the registry. We are asking everyone to consider being tested and entered into the registry, provided you are between the ages of 18 and 60 and you are generally in good health.

 

   It is important to understand that if you decide to be tested for Ezra through Gift of Life, you will be entered into the national registry and could be called upon to be a donor for any other patient in need. Being a donor is a significant physical and emotional commitment. We encourage you to read about what it means to be a donor on either the Gift of Life website at www.giftoflife.org or at the National Bone Marrow Donor Program at www.bethematch.org.

 

   You can also choose to be privately tested just to see if you are a match to Ezra (details below). Family members: Because tissue type is inherited, it is particularly important that you consider being tested either through Gift of Life or privately. If you decide to be tested through the registry, please provide us with your donor ID number so that Ezra’s doctors can specifically check your results.

 

   Please consider taking part in this worthy cause and you might bezocheh to help give the Gift of Life.

The Gift Of Life

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

   Our 18-month-old son, Ezra, has a rare primary immune deficiency called Hyper IgM Syndrome. His body is unable to produce certain antibodies to protect him from infection. Thankfully, he has been doing well with the medical treatments that he receives. However, serious complications can arise and the prognosis is unclear. A bone marrow or stem cell transplant is the only cure. His doctors recommend a transplant provided a suitable donor can be found. Right now there is no donor in the registry that is a perfect match to Ezra. We are starting a campaign to find his perfect match and we need your help.

 

   The Gift of Life, a non-profit organization, maintains a registry of potential bone marrow donors. A simple cheek swab test is all that is needed to determine someone’s tissue type and to enter the registry. We are asking everyone to consider being tested and entered into the registry, provided you are between the ages of 18 and 60 and you are generally in good health.

 

   It is important to understand that if you decide to be tested for Ezra through Gift of Life, you will be entered into the national registry and could be called upon to be a donor for any other patient in need. Being a donor is a significant physical and emotional commitment. We encourage you to read about what it means to be a donor on either the Gift of Life website at www.giftoflife.org or at the National Bone Marrow Donor Program at www.bethematch.org.

 

   You can also choose to be privately tested just to see if you are a match to Ezra (details below). Family members: Because tissue type is inherited, it is particularly important that you consider being tested either through Gift of Life or privately. If you decide to be tested through the registry, please provide us with your donor ID number so that Ezra’s doctors can specifically check your results.

 

   Please consider taking part in this worthy cause and you might bezocheh to help give the Gift of Life.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/the-gift-of-life/2010/10/27/

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