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September 4, 2015 / 20 Elul, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘International Atomic Energy Agency’

IAEA Says More Money Needed to Implement IranDeal

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

The United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency has said it will need more money to fulfill the requirements of the nuclear agreement signed by the U.S.-led delegation of world powers with Iran.

Speaking in Vienna to Reuters, IAEA director Yukiya Amano said that under the plan, the annual cost to the agency will be $10.63 million (9.2 million euros) – a sum he has asked member states to provide.

The 800,000 euros per month the agency has already received will be gone by the end of September, Amano said. The funds were made available by member states via discretionary funding contributions, he said.

The White House, meanwhile, has praised the UN nuclear agency for its quality safeguards and standards in developing its inspection plan for Iran’s Parchin military site.

“The fact is that the arrangements between Iran and the IAEA are sound and consistent with the IAEA’s long-established practice,” White House spokesperson Josh Earnest said Monday at a briefing with journalists.

According to a secret agreement with the IAEA and Iran revealed last week by The Associated Press, it will be Iranian inspectors who are authorized to inspect Iran’s Parchin military complex.

Parchin, located about 20 miles southeast of Tehran, has been suspected of being used in the development of a nuclear weapon.

According to “Separate Arrangement II” Iran decides which photos and videos are “safe” enough to pass to UN inspectors and which are not, “taking into account military concerns.”

At a hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Commitee, Amano refused to confirm the IAEA would have physical access inside Parchin.

Former deputy IAEA director-general Olli Heinonen told the AP he “could think of no similar concession with any other country.”

US Experts: That Activity in Parchin Site is No Road Renovation

Saturday, August 8th, 2015

(JNi.media) Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad-Javad Zarif on Saturday rejected US media claims about suspicious new developments at the Parchin facility, complaining that the Western media “have no other goal but to create an atmosphere of misunderstanding,” IRNA reported.

“The comments show that all the claims raised against the Islamic Republic of Iran on the issue are baseless,” Zarif insisted, adding that “it has been announced that a road building project has been implemented in the area.”

But the US-based think tank Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS, that’s actually their name, since 1993) is insisting that’s no road work over there, pointing to satellite images that show vehicles and containers being moved at Parchin.

Parchin is a military complex, some 19 miles southeast of Tehran. In July, the Iranian UN mission declared that there was no nuclear weapon production on the site and that the suspicions about Iran reactivating the site are born by a misconception caused by road reconstruction opposite the Mamloo Dam, which is located near the complex.

The UN International Atomic Energy Agency is very suspicious about Iran’s Parchin facility, and Senator Bob Corker (R-TN) has voiced concern about the kind of access the IAEA expected to have there.

“We cannot get [IAEA head Yukiya Amano] to even confirm that we will have physical access inside of Parchin,” Corker told reporters last week.

We probably will not.

ISIS said the satellite images were taken after Iran signed its deal with the 5+1 world powers on July 14.

“This renewed activity occurring after the [signing of the deal] raises obvious concerns that Iran is conducting further [cleanup] efforts to defeat IAEA verification,” the think tank’s report states.

US State Department spokesman Mark Toner told reporters on Thursday that a cleanup effort, if one is taking place, would be “cause for concern.” But he insisted the US is confident it knows what’s taking place at Parchin and is able to detect nuclear activity at any Iranian site.

“You can’t cover up past nuclear activity very easily. It lasts for decades, even longer,” Toner said.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest played down the possibility of Iranian efforts to restart nuclear works, but also said he wasn’t at liberty to discuss specific intelligence matters.

Iran Openly Refuses UN IAEA Inspectors Access to Military Sites

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

The Iranian security adviser to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei explained in a broadcast interview last week that United Nations nuclear inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency would not be given access to Tehran’s sensitive military nuclear sites.

Ali Akbar Velayati made the statement in a broadcast interview with Aljazeera on July 31, 2015 (clip# 5026) that was monitored and translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI).

“First, allow me to emphasize that the issue of the missiles and of Iran’s defensive capabilities were not part of the negotiations to begin with,” Velayati said.

“No matter what pressure is exerted, Iran never has negotiated and never will negotiate with others – America, Europe, or any other country – about the nature and quality of missiles it should manufacture or possess, or about the defensive military equipment that it needs. This is out of the question.

“We in Iran will independently determine what military equipment we need in order to defend our land, the regime of the Islamic Republic, the Iranian people, and the interest of our country.

“Therefore, we will not hesitate to obtain these weapons, with the exception of nuclear weapons or WMD, such as chemical weapons, which are internationally prohibited.

“Therefore, the missile issue is not a part of the nuclear agreement with the P5+1.

“Any different statement about this is baseless.

Regardless of how the P5+1 countries interpret the nuclear agreement, their entry into our military sites is absolutely forbidden. The entry of any foreigner, including IAEA inspectors or any other inspector, to the sensitive military sites of the Islamic Republic is forbidden, no matter what,” Velayati stated firmly. (italics added)

The interviewer asked: “That’s final?”

“Yes,” Velayati replied. “Final.”

He went on to say, “Israel does not dare to attack Iran. The moment it initiates such a thing, important Israeli cities will be razed to the ground.

“The U.S. accuses us of supporting terrorism and terrorists in the region. We ask the Americans: ‘Who are those terrorists?’ Their answer boils down to Hezbollah.

“Is Lebanese Hezbollah a terrorist party? We are proud of Hezbollah. It defends its existence and the existence of the Muslims, the Arabs and the Lebanese. Hezbollah was the first to deal Israel a real defeat.

“We are proud to be supporting Hezbollah, while America deems this support to constitute support of terrorism.

“First of all, we should sit down and define what terrorism is and who is a terrorist. We believe that if you defend your land you are not a terrorist.

“We are committed to the Vienna agreement,” he reiterated.

“How do you view the recent Security Council resolution?” asked the interviewer.

“We are not necessarily required to accept everything decided by the Security Council,” replied Velayati. “Let me give you an example that is important to us and to you.

“The Security Council might make resolutions in favor of Israel. We would not accept or recognize these resolutions. This is what the Arab and Islamic countries would do. They would not recognize these resolutions.

“There were quite a few UN Security Council resolutions which ran counter to the interests of some countries that did not recognize them.

“The Islamic Republic of Iran will not succumb to any international resolution that contradicts our strategic interests and our sovereignty.

“However, with regard to the Vienna agreement, if it wins the support of the legal authorities in Iran, Iran will be completely committed to it.”

ObamaDeal Exposed: It’s not ‘Secret’ from Congress but not in Writing

Friday, July 31st, 2015

The State Dept. was caught in yesterday’s press briefing claiming there were no “secret deals” with Iran but admitted that it has no written copy of the arrangements it is defending.

Associated Press journalist Matt Lee questioned spokesman Mark Toner at Thursday’s press briefing about many Congressmen’s concerns over IAEA access to Iran’s nuclear sites under the nuclear agreement.

Republican Sen. Bob Corker has said that IAEA director Dr. Yukiya Amano did not accept an invitation to testify at Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on the deal.

Toner declined to say whether Dr. Amano should testify but added:

There’s [sic] no secret deals, and we heard that expression thrown out constantly over the last couple of days. That couldn’t be farther from the truth. The IAEA, which is the one that verifies – will verify this deal, does create arrangements with countries under what’s called the Additional Protocol.

And Under Secretary Sherman has already had a secure briefing with the House leadership talking about this arrangement, and we’ve continued to provide or we will continue to provide those briefings in a classified setting, as needed….

So the perception that this has somehow been – that Congress hasn’t been looped in on this, and what we know about these arrangements is, frankly, incorrect. But they’ve had to take place in a classified setting.

Fine and dandy, but the reasonable assumption is that someone knows about the arrangements.

Lee told the spokesman:

But the notion – you said the notion that Congress hasn’t been looped in, but you haven’t been looped in because you guys haven’t read it.

Toner admitted:

We haven’t received a written copy of it, but we have been briefed on the contents.

And Lee retorted:

So someone with a photographic memory has looked at it and copied everything down in their brain and then repeated it up on the Hill?

Toner fidgeted and explained that “nuclear experts with much bigger degrees than I can ever attain have looked at this and their comfort level with it is good.”

But that does not answer the question, “If there is no secret deal, why isn’t a written version available?

Arab League Presses for Israel to Disclose Nuclear Development

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

The other shoe has fallen.

The Arab League has used the “ObamaDeal” nuclear agreement as a lever to exert diplomatic pressure on Israel to “join the non-proliferation agreement (NPT) as a non-nuclear state.”

Israel, assumed to have stockpile nuclear warheads, has maintained a position of “nuclear ambiguity” whereby it clams up about any nuclear weapons.

Arab League Secretary-General Nabil Elaraby said:

It’s time for the international community… to stop its policy of double standards and to undertake its responsibilities by pressuring Israel.

The U.N. General Assembly last year adopted a resolution calling for Israel to join the NPT and open the Dimona nuclear reactor to IAEA inspection.

Israel also possesses five German-made Dolphin-class submarines that reportedly can carry cruise missiles with nuclear warheads.

Obama Calls Netanyahu to Assure Him of ‘Concerns’ for Iranian Terror

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

President Barack Obama placed a check mark on his list of duties of protocol night and called Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu to assure him that the agreement with Iran ensures “the peaceful nature” of Tehran’s nuclear program. The White House summary of the phone call omitted Netanyahu’s response, which included two major concerns that he raised:

One, the agreement allows Iran to develop extensive capabilities that will serve it in arming itself with nuclear weapons whether at the end of the period of the agreement in another 10-15 years, or earlier if it violates the agreement.

Two, the agreement channels hundreds of billions of dollars to Iran’s terrorism and war machine, a war that is directed against us and against others in the region.

President Obama’s “reassurance” on the aspect of terror was nothing but an expression “of our concerns regarding Iran’s support for terrorism and threats toward Israel.” He did expound on how his “concerns” will thwart terror.

According to the White House version, President Obama noted that the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) “will verifiably prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon while ensuring the peaceful nature of Iran’s nuclear program going forward.

The White House was careful not to admit that Iran has 24 days to hide the evidence between the time that IAEA inspectors will ask to sniff for nuclear weapons development and the time they actually arrive.

“Snap inspections,” which Obama once said would part of the final deal, will not happen.

The President is going through the motions to show Congress how much his administration is Israel’s greatest ally and supporter, and he reminded Prime Minister Netanyahu last night that Secretary of Defense Ash Carter will visit Israel next week.

The President told the Prime Minister that the visit “is a reflection of the unprecedented level of security cooperation between the United States and Israel, and that the visit offers a further opportunity to continue our close consultation on security issues with Israeli counterparts as we remain vigilant in countering the Iranian regime’s destabilizing activities in the region.”

Uh-huh.

Prime Minister Netanyahu told the Security Cabinet last night that if weren’t for Israel, Iran would have nuclear weapons today. He explained:

The pressure that we applied and the actions that we undertook over the years led to the fact that Iran did not arm itself with nuclear weapons and I can safely say that were it not for Israel’s actions, including by governments that I led, Iran would have already armed itself with nuclear weapons.

And therefore, at present there is one mission – to ensure that it does not arm itself with nuclear weapons in the future.

Kerry Describes ‘Historic’ Nuclear Deal Signed Between World Powers, Iran

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced Tuesday morning in Vienna that world powers have struck an agreement to curb Iran’s nuclear development program.

In return, Iran will receive billions of dollars in relief from international sanctions to be relaxed in phases as Iran begins to comply with the commitments in the agreement.

According to the 109-page accord, Iran will enrich uranium only up to an amount of slightly less than 4 percent: enough for civilian medical and energy purposes. The Islamic Republic agreed to allow spot inspections – daily inspections, Kerry said – by monitors from the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) – at its nuclear research and development sites.

That access, however, is not guaranteed – especially at military sites, where the country’s parliament has just passed a law banning entry to any foreign or outside element. Even a delay could last long enough to allow nuclear scientists time to hide evidence of research into atomic weapons.

A three-month extension on talks between Iran and the IAEA to resolve outstanding issues was agreed to and signed this morning with the agency’s director, Yukiyo Amano, Kerry said. “Sanctions relief will only start when Iran complies with its commitments,” he reminded.

In addition, it was agreed the United Nations arms embargo imposed on Iran will continue for the next five years as well. UN restrictions on the transfer of ballistic missile technology to Tehran could last up to eight more years. Either or both sanctions, however, could end sooner, depending on clearance by the IAEA.

The “snap back” provision that allows sanctions to be reimposed if Iran violates the agreement will also stay in the agreement. Kerry noted this point is particularly important, inasmuch as the negotiators began their talks when Iran’s breakout time to a nuclear weapon was only a total of two to three months – and when the Islamic Republic already had amassed “enough fissile material for 10 to 12 [atomic] bombs.”

Perhaps that is one reason the deal is “not built on trust, it is built on verification,” as President Barack Obama told Americans in a broadcast from the White House carried live on Iranian state television. Obama added that all potential pathways to an Iranian nuclear weapon have been cut off.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said in Tehran that a “new chapter” has begun in his nation’s relations with the global community.

Kerry also commented that the signing of the agreement could not guarantee its commitment; rather, “it’s the implementation that will matter,” he said. Nevertheless, despite fiery rhetoric filled with venom and vows by Iranian leaders not to allow outside access to the country’s nuclear sites, Kerry said negotiators talked a different tale at the negotiating table.

“The negotiators absolutely affirmed to us… that they are operating with a full mandate from the President [Hassan]Rouhani, and from the Supreme Leader,” Kerry said. Whether they were telling the truth, however, only time can tell.

“In the negotiation, you lay down the procedures that are expected to be taken and you lay down the consequences for not doing that,” he added.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/kerry-describes-historic-nuclear-deal-signed-between-world-powers-iran/2015/07/14/

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