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August 5, 2015 / 20 Av, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Israel Museum’

Oldest Set of 10 Commandments Showing in Israel

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

Israel’s national museum has opened a rare exhibit that includes the world’s oldest copy of the Ten Commandments.

The exhibit presents objects from “pivotal moments in civilization.” Among the items is a 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scroll in which is inscribed a complete copy of the Ten Commandments.

This particular manuscript has never before been shown in Israel, and was only displayed briefly abroad.

The Dead Sea Scrolls comprise a collection of ancient Biblical manuscripts – some in fragments – discovered in a cave along the northern shores of the Dead Sea.

Rare ‘Four Species’ Coin from Bar Kochba in Display in Israel

Monday, October 6th, 2014

A rare silver coin with an inscription form the period of the Bar Kochba revolt is on display at the Israel Museum through the week-long Sukkot holiday, which begins Wednesday night.

The rare cache of Byzantine-era antiquities discovered in 2013 will be on display through the Sukkot holiday.

The writing on the coin with a depiction of the Four Species used on Sukkot indicates that it was written by Bar Kochba or in his name and illustrates the effort spent to supply the Four Species to Bar Kochba’s soldiers in the rebellion against the Roman conquerors.

The exhibition includes the largest gold medallion with Judaic symbols known in existence. Among the archaeological finds on view are gold coins and silver and gold jewelry, in addition to the sizable medallion, measuring four inches in diameter.

The treasures were found in a Byzantine period public building near the southern wall of the Temple Mount during excavations led by Dr. Eilat Mazar, of Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology, together with a team from Oklahoma’s Ambassador College.

The unique medallion has, in its center, a seven-branched menorah. On the left is a shofar, the ram’s horn traditionally blown on the Jewish New Year and Day of Atonement. On the right is an unidentified object, possibly a bundle of myrtle, willow and palm branches, being three of the four species used during the Sukkot holiday and common Jewish symbols of the period, or perhaps a uniquely fashioned Torah scroll of unknown design from this period.

The unusually large size of the medallion raises important questions about its use. Some scholars believe it was used to decorate a Torah or piece of furniture, while others argue that it was simply a large ceremonial ornament. Like many finds from this period, the medallion’s combination of symbols reflects the timeless notion of ​​Jewish yearning for the restoration of the Temple, destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE.

One of the two cloth pouches in which the hoard was found held thirty-six gold coins, decorated on one side with portraits of Byzantine-era emperors over a period of 250 years, together with their names and titles; on the back there are crosses or images of gods. The latest coin is dated 602 CE, indicating that the cache was hidden at the beginning of the 7th century, possibly during the Persian invasion of 614 CE.

bible coin

 

 

Wine, Cheese and Memories

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

I love a lot about Jerusalem. I love that even though it’s hot, it’s a dry heat with breezes. I love that it’s a bustling town, but not the metropolis that is Tel Aviv. I love that the air feels Jewish, which is a weird thing to conceptualize, but not if you’ve been here. But one of the things that I love most about Jerusalem, is that every summer they host the Jerusalem Wine Festival. There are a lot of festivals in this city; the Klezmer Festival, the Lights Festival (still never been!), the Beer Festival (skip it!) and the Arts Festival (super- fun!) but for me no festival compares to this one. This year’s festival was especially welcome, since it had been postponed from July due to “the situation” (Thanks Hamas!) But as they say, you can’t keep Jews from their wine!” (Does anyone say that? They should.) One of the really nice things about our ulpan is that they offer the students intermittent tiyulim/trips all over the city and sometimes elsewhere in the country. Usually, I skip them, having done Birthright an obscene number of times and therefore having already experienced the destinations. But yesterday, we were offered free admission to the Israel Museum! A perennial favorite and kinda pricey for an unemployed ulpan student, the museum is also host to the wine festival, so I jumped at the chance! After an afternoon of culture (still hate modern art, still love the Impressionists) a bunch of friends from the ulpan and I followed the jazzy music to the festival.

neon

For those who haven’t been there, here’s the scenario: Sunset, the Israel Museum’s sculpture garden, breeze and music. You hand your ticket to the lady and she hands you a brand-new wine glass. Which is then yours forever! Well, definitely for the rest of the night. You take this glass to the myriad winery booths, both large (Golan Heights, for example) and boutique, where sweet and knowledgeable winery employees pour you as many tastes of as many wines as you want. Seriously! If this sounds like a dream, it is, but a very real one. You a red kinda guy? All the Merlot you can handle! You more of a white wine kinda gal? So much Emerald Riesling to choose from! Some people take the evening seriously, tasting and spitting, asking and purchasing their favorites. I am not those people. For although my friend Aaron tried valiantly to teach me a thing or two about the magical world of wines, I was not the greatest student. But for the tasting, I was all in, kids.

pub

What’s best to pair with all these wines? Some went for sushi, others chose pizza, but I was all about the cheese plate. There were 2 large cheese kiosks, chocked full of every type of fromage, so I just asked for some diverse options, bought a couple rolls, and had a fabulous little wine and cheese party on one of the festive cocktail tables they had kindly set out for their guests. Classy shindig, for sure. After several hours of tasting, everyone is happy, everyone is friendly and everyone is sleepy. So you just head out to one of the waiting buses and enjoy a delicious sleep after a delicious evening.
I know this all seems like an advertisement, but I think everyone who attends this festival feels this same way. We wait all year for it, and if you plan a trip here, maybe try and have it coincide with this 4-evening wine extravaganza. And let me be your guide- you won’t learn a thing about wine, but I’ll share my cheese with you!

Bamboo

Sunday, August 31st, 2014

The Israel Museum has a wonderful interactive exhibit called “Bamboo”, or as the kids call it, “Bambuk”.

Made completely out of bamboo poles and rope, you can walk all over around it, all the way to the top of this multistory structure.

Highly recommended.

Israel Museum Buys 1,500-Year-Old Persian Coin Collection

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

The Israel Museum has bought more than 1,200 silver coins that were used in Persia in the 4th and 5th centuries and which includes several rare coins.

Referring to a rare silver artifact called the “first Jewish coin” because of the inscription of the word “Judea” in Aramaic, the museum’s chief curator of archaeology, Chaim Gitler, told the Times of Israel, “It’s the earliest coin from the province of Judea.”

The “Jewish coin” was reportedly found in the southern Hevron Hills, between Hevron and Be’er Sheva, and was bought by New York collector Jonathan Rosen, who agreed to donate his collection to the Israel Museum.

Kite-Flying Festival

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

The Kite-Flying Festival, held annually at the Israel Museum, has become a Jerusalem tradition. Professional and amateur kite lovers from all over the country gather in Jerusalem every summer to fly kites that they designed themselves or created at the workshops held at the museum during the festival.

During the festival, the museum’s skies are transformed into a vivid display of color and shape that is visible from miles away.

Photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Israel to Show Off to Obama Hi-Tech ‘Robot Snake’ (Video)

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu next week will show President Barack Obama a series of technological products by Israel’s high-tech industries in the framework of a special exhibit that will be set up in President Obama’s honor.

The products that were chosen are in the fields of renewable energy, the war on traffic accidents, medicine, search and rescue, and robotics.

After touring the “Israeli Technology – For a Better World”  exhibit at the Israel Museum, President Obama will meet with the next generation of Israeli scientists – young people from Haifa, who won an international robotics competition that was held in the United States last year.

Prime Minister Netanyahu will present to President Obama seven products that were chosen by a professional committee from among proposals presented by Israel’s universities.

National Information Directorate head Liran Dan said, “There are two principal messages that we would like to emphasize during the visit.  First and foremost is the deep connection between Israel and the US. Alongside this, we would also like to present to the world the products of the future that originate in Israel and which will be used in many places around the world.”

The chosen products are, in the field of energy alternatives – Phinergy;

In the field of the struggle against traffic accidents – Mobileye;

In the field of medicine – BNA technology by ElMindA , MiniDesktop and Rewalk; and

In the field of search and rescue – robot snake

The seventh product is a “robot waiter” that was designed by Haifa junior high school pupils and which was developed with guidance from Technion researchers.

The device was the winner in an international robotics competition that was held in the United States last year. It shows how a robot might serve a handicapped person in his home. The robot is 35 centimeters tall and uses sensors to orient itself in its surroundings and perform tasks that it has been programmed to do.

Phinergy has developed an aluminum-air battery designed for electric vehicles, and which allows a significant increase in travel range – three times that of a regular electric vehicle. The technology will allow for a reduction in

Mobileye, a global pioneer in developing Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), is to develop and market vision-based systems that will help drivers keep passengers safe on the roads and decrease traffic accidents by warning about dangerous situations and even braking the vehicle when necessary. To date, Mobileye’s technology has been implemented and launched by BMW, Volvo, GM and Ford in over one million vehicles.

ElMindA’s Brain Network Activation technology platform provides a non-invasive tool for the visualization and quantification of BNAs of specific brain functionalities, disease development and rehabilitation from injuries, reactions to treatment, psychiatric and neurological problems, and pain.

The robot snake is designed to enter spaces in collapsed structures with minimal disturbance. The robot assists in location and rescue operations and is unique in its manner of crawling and is very flexible thanks to its great number of segments.

Each joint is motorized and has a computer, sensors, wireless communications and batteries. Its head carries a camera. Thanks to its flexible structure, the snake is able to crawl through wreckage without causing additional structural collapses and provide vital information about inaccessible areas.

The  Rewalk approach aims to give persons with lower limb disabilities, such as paraplegia, an experience that is as close to natural walking as possible. The ReWalk exoskeleton suit uses a patented technology with motorized legs that power knee and hip movement. Battery-powered for all-day use, ReWalk is controlled by on-board computers and motion sensors.

The MiniDesktop is a headset that enables computers to be controlled by brainwaves or facial movements. The computer is controlled without a mouse or keyboard by means of a headset that images the user’s brainwaves from 14 separate points. The system, which was developed by three software engineering graduates from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, is designed to serve the physically handicapped who could not otherwise operate a computer or other devices.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/israel-to-show-off-to-obama-hi-tech-robot-snake-video/2013/03/14/

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