web analytics
August 30, 2016 / 26 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Israel Museum’

Thousands March 9 B’Av Night in Support of Israeli Sovereignty in Judea and Samaria

Sunday, August 14th, 2016

Thousands of marchers from all across Israel participated in the 22nd annual walk around the walls of the old city of Jerusalem on Tisha B’Av night, Saturday, organized by Women in Green. This year the walk, which began following the traditional reading of the scroll of Lamentations at the Independence Park in downtown Jerusalem, was focused on Israeli sovereignty in Judea and Samaria. The marchers circled the ancient walls carrying Israeli flags, accompanied by police.

The march was concluded with a rally that began with a rousing speech by Women in Green co-founders Yehudit Katsover and Nadia matar. Katsover asked why did the 9th of Av become the time of the year when so many calamities took place in the history of the Jewish nation (the destruction of two temples, the fall of the city of Beitar to the Romans, the expulsion from Spain, the expulsion from the Gaza Strip). She pointed to the fact that the sin of the spies, the first event that established Tisha B’Av as a day of mourning for the ages, was the sin of fear of going out to conquer the promised land. The spies convinced the nation that we couldn’t do it.

9 B'Av Jerusalem march 2016 organizers Yehudit Katsover and Nadia matar / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

9 B’Av Jerusalem march 2016 organizers Yehudit Katsover and Nadia matar / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

“We can’t do it! The state of mind of ‘I can’t do it’ is the cause of defeat. That’s the root of the destruction,” Katsover said. “Tisha B’Av is here to remind us to mourn the things we could have done but didn’t … because of our fear. We don’t build in Judea and Samaria because we’re afraid of pressure from the dwarf Obama. We fail to save [the community set for demolition] Amona because the Supreme Court is afraid of the world. We don’t impose sovereignty because we fear the demographics. We don’t carry out this march in the direction of the Temple Mount because we fear the Arabs and the deteriorating State of Jordan.”

“If we allow our subjective fears to dictate our objective reality, we’ll keep falling time and again,” Katsover declared. “This is the root of our destruction. The first time this approach was introduced was on Tisha B’Av and since then, each year, we cry over the fact that we failed to trust ourselves.” And she announced, “On this Tisha B’Av we’ll decide that we can do. We can and we will. We will not permit the baseless tears to stop us.”

Jerusalem Deputy Mayor Dov Kalmanovich / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

Jerusalem Deputy Mayor Dov Kalmanovich / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

Dov Kalmanovich, Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem, the first Israeli victim of the First Intifada (the skin of his face and a large part of his body were burned away by a Molotov cocktail that was hurled at his car on December 9, 1987), said the way to bolster Israel sovereignty across the Land of Israel was through unrelenting construction. He said liberation didn’t end with the conquering of the city, that’s where it started — and the rest is all about building the city. “With your support we’ll cry out for a sovereign Jerusalem,” but this sovereignty must be borne by physical building, Kalmanovich told the marchers.

Former MK Aryeh Eldad / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

Former MK Aryeh Eldad / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

 

Former MK Aryeh Eldad told the audience about his late father, MK Israel Eldad, who each year on Tisha B’Av would visit the Israel Museum, stand in front of the statue of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, who suppressed the Bar Kokhva rebellion (132 – 135 CE) and tell him, “So, what do you say? Where are you and where are we now?”

“On the surface he appeared to be right,” Eldad said about his father. “The Roman Empire disappeared and we are here, a sovereign nation returning to its homeland after destruction and catastrophe the likes of which history has not known. But it isn’t that simple.”

“The curse of Hadrian is still hovering above us,” Eldad continued. “After he destroyed Beitar and hundreds of other communities, and massacred half a million Jews, he was not satisfied, and sought to revise history and erase the memory of Israel. This is why he rename Jerusalem Aelia Capitolina (after Jupiter Capitolinus, the same god who eventually lent a derivation of his name to Capitol Hill). And he changed the name of the province of Judea to the province of Syria-Palestine.”

“This curse of Palestine has been chasing us to this day,” Eldad said. “If we want to return to the mountain, we must erase the name Palestine from Eretz Israel.”

The crowd responded with soaring applause.

Other speakers included Rina Ariel, mother of 13-year-old Halel Yaffa Ariel hy”d who was murdered in her bed a few weeks ago by an Arab terrorist; former Russian dissident Rabbi Yosef Mendelevich; and Deputy Defense Minister Rabbi Eli Ben-Dahan.

MK Yehuda Glick / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

MK Yehuda Glick / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

The last speaker at the rally was MK Yehuda Glick, whose name and personal history have become intertwined with the story of Jewish efforts to return to the Temple Mount. “For two thousand years we’ve kept the commandment of ‘Bitterly she will weep at night’ (Lamentations 1:2), but no more! We stop crying and start doing! The fathers of the Zionist movement have taught us the diaspora is not only the punishment but the sin, too. Zion is the holy Mt. Zion, and Zionism took that name because it wanted to return to Zion, to the Temple Mount, and you,” he turned to the audience, “are part of the return to Zion, to the Temple Mount.”

Pointing out that when he began ascending to the Temple Mount only about a hundred Jews a year would go there, but in the past year some 20 thousand have come.

“Since the day fifty years ago, when God gave us, through the IDF, the land of our fathers, the Golan, Judea, Samaria and Jerusalem, and we said that Temple Mount is in our hands (the famous victory cry of Paratroopers commander Gen. Motta Gur, June 7, 1967), it really has been in our hands,” Glick said. “Temple Mount is holy, not the status quo,” he continued, crying, “Eicha-How [the Hebrew title of the Book of lamentations] is a scream. How can there be such and absurd reality in which we cannot pray in this place? How can it be that the global center of ‘Nation will not take up sword against nation’ fall in the hands of people who sanctify the sword? How can we give more and more power to the Waqf?”

Glick, whose first few months in office have been marked by liberal and tolerant statements that puzzle the media, concluded decidedly, “We must make clear that all the talk about the chance for a Palestinian State is finished. We will proceed in imposing Israeli sovereignty in Judea and Samaria, and anyone wishing to live in peace is welcome, and if they don’t we’ll use harsh measure against them.”

“We are now a nation of building in the daytime, not a nation of weeping at night,” Glick concluded.

The rally then erupted in three calls of “Higia z’man ribonut” (the time for sovereignty is now) and proceeded to the Kotel Plaza to sit down and say Lamentations.

9 B'Av Jerusalem marchers 2016 / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

9 B’Av Jerusalem marchers 2016 / Photo credit: Gershon Elinson

JNi.Media

Israel, Austria Celebrate 60 years of Diplomacy

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Austrian Ambassador to Israel Martin Weiss tweeted his thanks for an evening at the Israel Museum celebrating 60 years of Austrian-Israeli relations. The evening event featured a speech by Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, who began the week in Jerusalem, meeting with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israel Ambassador to Austria Talya Lador was present Sunday to greet the foreign minister upon his arrival in the country. For his part, Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met this week with a group of young Austrians. “We really appreciate that you took the time!” tweeted Ambassador Weiss.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met with a delegation of young Austrians.

Kurz took time Monday to visit the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial museum, and spoke with Austrian Holocaust survivors in Jerusalem. He tied up the day by laying a wreath in a memorial ceremony at the Mount Herzl military ceremony in the capital.

Netanyahu and Kurz also met to sign a “working-holiday agreement” that provides easy access for the young to work in each others’ country,” Weiss said.

Kurz also met with Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah during the day on Monday as well.

Hana Levi Julian

Jerusalem’s Israel Museum Searches for New Director

Monday, February 29th, 2016

The Israel Museum in Jerusalem is in search for a new director.

The institution announced in a statement Sunday that James Snyder, director since 1997, will become its International President in 2017.

Snyder brought the institution through the most dramatic growth since its founding” including a “$100 million expansion and renewal of the entire Museum,” according to the statement.

In his new position, Snyder will direct the museum’s worldwide activities.

The Israel Museum hosts more than 800,000 visitors each year – double the number of visitors who were coming before Snyder assumed his position nearly 20 years ago.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Best Friends Forever?

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015

Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked met with Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein at a special Cabinet meeting held in the Israel Museum on May 19, 2015.

The position of Attorney General is one of those that Shaked hopes to reform.

Photo of the Day

Oldest Set of 10 Commandments Showing in Israel

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

Israel’s national museum has opened a rare exhibit that includes the world’s oldest copy of the Ten Commandments.

The exhibit presents objects from “pivotal moments in civilization.” Among the items is a 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scroll in which is inscribed a complete copy of the Ten Commandments.

This particular manuscript has never before been shown in Israel, and was only displayed briefly abroad.

The Dead Sea Scrolls comprise a collection of ancient Biblical manuscripts – some in fragments – discovered in a cave along the northern shores of the Dead Sea.

Hana Levi Julian

Rare ‘Four Species’ Coin from Bar Kochba in Display in Israel

Monday, October 6th, 2014

A rare silver coin with an inscription form the period of the Bar Kochba revolt is on display at the Israel Museum through the week-long Sukkot holiday, which begins Wednesday night.

The rare cache of Byzantine-era antiquities discovered in 2013 will be on display through the Sukkot holiday.

The writing on the coin with a depiction of the Four Species used on Sukkot indicates that it was written by Bar Kochba or in his name and illustrates the effort spent to supply the Four Species to Bar Kochba’s soldiers in the rebellion against the Roman conquerors.

The exhibition includes the largest gold medallion with Judaic symbols known in existence. Among the archaeological finds on view are gold coins and silver and gold jewelry, in addition to the sizable medallion, measuring four inches in diameter.

The treasures were found in a Byzantine period public building near the southern wall of the Temple Mount during excavations led by Dr. Eilat Mazar, of Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology, together with a team from Oklahoma’s Ambassador College.

The unique medallion has, in its center, a seven-branched menorah. On the left is a shofar, the ram’s horn traditionally blown on the Jewish New Year and Day of Atonement. On the right is an unidentified object, possibly a bundle of myrtle, willow and palm branches, being three of the four species used during the Sukkot holiday and common Jewish symbols of the period, or perhaps a uniquely fashioned Torah scroll of unknown design from this period.

The unusually large size of the medallion raises important questions about its use. Some scholars believe it was used to decorate a Torah or piece of furniture, while others argue that it was simply a large ceremonial ornament. Like many finds from this period, the medallion’s combination of symbols reflects the timeless notion of ​​Jewish yearning for the restoration of the Temple, destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE.

One of the two cloth pouches in which the hoard was found held thirty-six gold coins, decorated on one side with portraits of Byzantine-era emperors over a period of 250 years, together with their names and titles; on the back there are crosses or images of gods. The latest coin is dated 602 CE, indicating that the cache was hidden at the beginning of the 7th century, possibly during the Persian invasion of 614 CE.

bible coin

 

 

Jewish Press Staff

Wine, Cheese and Memories

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

I love a lot about Jerusalem. I love that even though it’s hot, it’s a dry heat with breezes. I love that it’s a bustling town, but not the metropolis that is Tel Aviv. I love that the air feels Jewish, which is a weird thing to conceptualize, but not if you’ve been here. But one of the things that I love most about Jerusalem, is that every summer they host the Jerusalem Wine Festival. There are a lot of festivals in this city; the Klezmer Festival, the Lights Festival (still never been!), the Beer Festival (skip it!) and the Arts Festival (super- fun!) but for me no festival compares to this one. This year’s festival was especially welcome, since it had been postponed from July due to “the situation” (Thanks Hamas!) But as they say, you can’t keep Jews from their wine!” (Does anyone say that? They should.) One of the really nice things about our ulpan is that they offer the students intermittent tiyulim/trips all over the city and sometimes elsewhere in the country. Usually, I skip them, having done Birthright an obscene number of times and therefore having already experienced the destinations. But yesterday, we were offered free admission to the Israel Museum! A perennial favorite and kinda pricey for an unemployed ulpan student, the museum is also host to the wine festival, so I jumped at the chance! After an afternoon of culture (still hate modern art, still love the Impressionists) a bunch of friends from the ulpan and I followed the jazzy music to the festival.

neon

For those who haven’t been there, here’s the scenario: Sunset, the Israel Museum’s sculpture garden, breeze and music. You hand your ticket to the lady and she hands you a brand-new wine glass. Which is then yours forever! Well, definitely for the rest of the night. You take this glass to the myriad winery booths, both large (Golan Heights, for example) and boutique, where sweet and knowledgeable winery employees pour you as many tastes of as many wines as you want. Seriously! If this sounds like a dream, it is, but a very real one. You a red kinda guy? All the Merlot you can handle! You more of a white wine kinda gal? So much Emerald Riesling to choose from! Some people take the evening seriously, tasting and spitting, asking and purchasing their favorites. I am not those people. For although my friend Aaron tried valiantly to teach me a thing or two about the magical world of wines, I was not the greatest student. But for the tasting, I was all in, kids.

pub

What’s best to pair with all these wines? Some went for sushi, others chose pizza, but I was all about the cheese plate. There were 2 large cheese kiosks, chocked full of every type of fromage, so I just asked for some diverse options, bought a couple rolls, and had a fabulous little wine and cheese party on one of the festive cocktail tables they had kindly set out for their guests. Classy shindig, for sure. After several hours of tasting, everyone is happy, everyone is friendly and everyone is sleepy. So you just head out to one of the waiting buses and enjoy a delicious sleep after a delicious evening.
I know this all seems like an advertisement, but I think everyone who attends this festival feels this same way. We wait all year for it, and if you plan a trip here, maybe try and have it coincide with this 4-evening wine extravaganza. And let me be your guide- you won’t learn a thing about wine, but I’ll share my cheese with you!

Jordana Brown

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/jordana-in-jerusalem/wine-cheese-and-memories/2014/09/07/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: