web analytics
December 25, 2014 / 3 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Japan’

Japan Nuclear Plant Approved to Restart

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

For the first time since the catastrophic 2011 meltdown of the Fukushima nuclear plant, Japan has approved the restart of a nuclear power station.

The town of Satsuma Sendai, home to 100,000 residents, has approved the restart of the two-reactor Kyushu Electric Power Company plant.

The Sendai plant is central to the economy of the town, located 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) southwest of Tokyo, providing jobs as well as government subsidies to the population.

The approval signals a rejuvenation in the Japanese nuclear power industry.

The meltdown of three of the plant’s six reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex resulted from a mammoth tsunami that struck the plant following a 9.0-magnitude earthquake that hit the Fukushima prefecture on March 11, 2011. Within less than 24 hours, the plant started releasing substantial amounts of radioactive material.

Israel was one of the first nations allowed by Japan to assist in the disaster. The IDF and other Israeli first responder aid specialists sent teams to Fukushima to provide medical and other assistance as needed.

Two planes carried 50 doctors, representatives of the IDF Home Front Command and Foreign Ministry, 62 tons of medical supplies and 18 tons of humanitarian supplies. Included were 10,000 coats, 6,000 blankets, 8,000 pairs of gloves and 150 portable toilets. Also included were medical instruments, fuel, oxygen, medication, food, water, hospital beds and other equipment for establishing a medical clinic.

More than 300,000 people were evacuated from the area, and at least 15,884 people died.

Since that time, Japan has not allowed any nuclear plant to resume operations.

Each nuclear reactor was slowly and carefully monitored as it wound down operations for its periodic maintenance, and then ordered to remain shut down until further notice.

The Kyushu Electric Power Company plant at Satsumu Sendai is the first to be allowed to restart since the disaster.

The cleanup process of continued spills of contaminated water at the Fukushima plant is expected to take decades, according to nuclear scientists. The disaster was the largest nuclear incident since the April 1986 Chernobyl accident, and the second to measure Level 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale.

Big in Israel

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

It’s not every day that a world champion sumo wrestler visits Israel’s capital. But on Tuesday, October 21, Israelis of all ages watched in fascination as the Hawaiian-born Japanese-Samoan former sumo star, Konishiki Yasokichi shared his moves during a special workshop for children in Jerusalem.

The sumo wrestling workshop was part of the first Japanese Culture Week, held in cooperation with the Embassy of Japan, the Jerusalem Municipality, the Israel Foreign Ministry and the Israeli Center for the Advancement of Culture and Knowledge from October 19 – 25.

Today a popular celebrity in Japan, Konishiki, during the height of his career, reached ozeki, the second highest rank in sumo, a sport with origins that go back 2,000 years ago.

“It’s my first time in Jerusalem,” said Konishiki in an interview with Tazpit News Agency. “I’ve always wanted to visit and it’s been an exciting experience to be here in the Holy Land, teaching kids sumo wrestling.”

“It’s a lot calmer here than I thought it would be,” added the legendary sumo wrestler, who has been living in Japan for 32 years.

In addition to sumo wrestling, the new cultural festival also featured Sake tastings, Japanese music shows, tea ceremonies, Ikebana films, Japanese cooking and Origami workshops.

Israel has been growing increasingly close to Japan recently. Following a successful visit by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to Japan earlier in May, Israel became the first country that Japan signed an Industrial R&D (Research and Development) Collaboration Agreement during a visit by the Japanese Economic Minister to Israel in July.

The relations are of particular importance given Japan’s advanced technology and strong economy, which is ranked third in the world in terms of GDP.

“We are building different levels of connections with Japan,” said Hagai Shagrir, Director of the North East Asia Department of the Israel Foreign Ministry. “Connections are being formed both on a government level with ministers and leaders and also between our people in the areas of technology, science and culture,” Shagrir told Tazpit.

“We hope to see increased tourism between both Japan and Israel as well,” said Shagrir, whose department oversees relations with Japan, China and South Korea.

“Although we are geographically very far apart, we share some similarities,” Shagrir told Tazpit. “Both countries do not have natural resources and consequently we have had to develop our human resources. Both Japan and Israel have invested greatly in education.”

“As an Israeli, I respect the ancient and beautiful elements of Japanese art and culture along with the modern elements,” commented Eyal Lavit, one of the organizers of the Japan Culture Week.

For Emy Osaka, who grew up in southwestern Japan but has been living in Israel for 20 years and speaks Hebrew fluently, Japan Culture Week has been an exciting event. “Seeing Konishiki here with my kids was amazing. This event makes Jerusalem feel more like home,” she told Tazpit.

“Through sumo wrestling and maybe other sports, we hope to strengthen the cultural exchange between Japan and Israel,” concluded Konishiki. “The kids here are definitely excited about it.”

Japanese Minister of Economy Signs First Ever Industrial Agreement with Israel

Monday, July 7th, 2014

JERUSALEM -Japanese Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, Toshimitsu Motegi, arrived in Israel yesterday (Jul. 6) with a delegation of Japanese industrialists and signed a first of its kind industrial research and development (R&D) collaboration agreement with Israel’s Minister of Economy Naftali Bennett. Israel is the first country with which Japan has signed such an agreement.

The delegation came to Israel following an invitation by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whom Motegi met during Netanyahu’s recent visit to Japan. The Japanese minister is heading a delegation including top level representatives of Japanese industry as well as senior representatives of Japan’s Ministry of Economics, Trade and Industry, which oversees Japanese industry, industrial R&D, and cyber technology. Minister Motegi and Israel’s Minister of Economy Naftali Bennett signed a collaboration agreement for reciprocal support in joint industrial R&D projects between Israeli and Japanese companies and organizations. The agreement will be implemented by the Office of the Chief Scientist (OCS) in the Israeli Ministry of Economy.

The delegation will also participate in a seminar in which opportunities for commercial cooperation between the two states will be presented. The seminar, organized by the Foreign Trade Administration at the Israeli Ministry of Economy and the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO), will be presided over by Minister Motegi and the Director-General of Israel’s Ministry of Economy Amit Lang. Participants include Israeli businesspeople and representatives of the Japanese companies in the delegation.

“We are constantly looking for ways to strengthen our economic ties throughout the world, as exemplified by this R&D agreement,” Minister Bennett said. “This is a breakthrough achievement. The agreement creates an excellent platform for joint initiatives, innovation and for Israeli companies to enter the Japanese market.”

“At a time when the largest Japanese companies are searching for new engines of growth via business and technological innovation, this is an excellent window of opportunity for Israeli companies in general, and specifically for those with groundbreaking technology,” said Israel’s Chief Scientist in the Ministry of Economy Avi Hasson, who oversees Israel’s international activity in industrial R&D.

“Over the past year, the Japanese business sector’s interest in Israel and in cooperation with Israeli businesses has grown, in particular in the homeland security sector, including cyber-security,” said Eitan Kuperstoch, Israel’s commercial attaché to Tokyo. “In the past year alone, more than 6,000 Japanese businesspeople have participated in events organized by the commercial attachés of the Israeli Ministry of Economy.”
In recent months, three Japanese business delegations arrived in Israel, most notably the Keidanren Japan Business Federation.

Teva’s Parkinson Drug Now Marketed in Japan

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Japan’s largest pharmaceutical company, Takeda, recently signed an agreement with Teva Pharmaceutical Industries to commercialize the Israeli company’s innovative treatment for Parkinson’s disease, rasagiline, in Japan.

The rasagiline tablets, which are approved in over 40 countries for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, gained UK and EU-marketing authorization in 2005 and US FDA approval in 2006.

“It is estimated there are about 150,000-180,000 people diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in Japan, many of whom are waiting for a new treatment option,” said Nancy Joseph-Ridge, M.D., General Manager of Takeda’s Pharmaceutical Development Division located in Osaka, Japan in a press release on April 27.

“We will continue working on the development in cooperation with Teva so that we can bring this medicine to Japanese patients as quickly as possible,” Joseph-Ridge said.

“This agreement represents Teva’s continued commitment to introducing our innovative medicines to patients in Japan,” added Teva Global R&D president and Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Michael Hayden.

Teva and Takeda entered an agreement in December 2013 to develop glatiramer acetate for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

Developed by Teva, rasagiline was initially discovered by two Haifa Technion professors, John Finberg and Moussa Youdim, who were instrumental in the early clinical development of the anti-Parkinson drug.

Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, whose symptoms include shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficultly with walking as well as dementia in advanced stages. An estimated seven to 10 million people suffer from the disease across the world according to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation.

According to Teva’s website, rasagiline is a monoaxmine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor that increases available synaptic dopamine in the brain, which might improve the motor symptoms characteristic of Parkinson’s, slowing the progression of the disease.

“Rasagiline has an established safety and efficacy profile…[it] will be an important product for Japan, where the number of available treatment options for Parkinson’s disease remains limited,” said Dr. Hayden.

Netanyahu Warns Japan to Take Iran Seriously

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

Prime Minister Netanyahu concluded his visit to Japan with a call on Japan to address Iran’s nuclear program with the same seriousness it treat’s North Korea’s.

“We are interested in peace and stability throughout the world. We see a danger and a challenge posed by a rogue state arming itself with nuclear weapons. In your case it’s North Korea and we obviously sympathize and understand the predicament facing you. We are faced with such a rogue state in the form of Iran and its quest to develop nuclear weapons… Clearly the Ayatollahs (in Iran) cannot be trusted and if the international community wants to avoid the specter of nuclear terrorism, they must assure that Iran, the foremost sponsor of terrorism on the planet, not have the capability to develop nuclear weapons,” said Netanyahu.

Big in Japan

Friday, May 9th, 2014

Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu will be traveling to Japan on Saturday evening for a four day meeting to discuss increasing economic and diplomatic cooperation.

During the meeting, Netanyahu will meet the emperor and empress of Japan, as well as the Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abo.

Its expected that in 2014 the Asian market became Israel’s 2nd largest export partner, knocking the US down a notch.

Israel’s exports to Japan stand at $1.1 billion, and its imports at $1.5 billion. According to a Jerusalem Post report, there is a tremendous amount of room for increased trade with Japan.

Trade with Asia is nothing new for Israel. The Far East has been a trade partner with Israel going back 3000 years.

Domo arigato gozaimasu.

Tokyo Police Arrest Man in Connection With Anne Frank Vandalism

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Tokyo Metropolitan Police reportedly have arrested a man in connection with the vandalism of hundreds of copies of “The Diary of Anne Frank” in city libraries.

The Tokyo resident, identified as an “unemployed man in his 30s,” made a statement admitting to some involvement in the vandalism of the books in February, according to a website citing the Japanese-language MSN Sankei News.

Police arrested the man on March 7 for entering a bookstore in the Ikebukuro district to hang up a poster without permission. It is not known what the posters said.

Footage from the store’s security cameras reportedly show the same man wandering back and forth inside the same bookstore through sections dealing with the Holocaust in the Ikebukuro district in February, including the day that some of the damage occurred.

Pages were ripped from at least 265 copies of the diary and other related books in public libraries and book stores throughout Tokyo in February.

Police have confiscated the arrested man’s cell phone and computer and have looked at security footage from other locations where vandalism occurred and have spotted the man in the videos, according to Sankei.

About 30,000 Japanese tourists visit the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam every year, about 5,000 visitors more than the number of visitors from Israel.

Japan is also the only East Asian country with statues and a museum in memory of Anne Frank.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/tokyo-police-arrest-man-in-connection-with-anne-frank-vandalism/2014/03/13/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: