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March 2, 2015 / 11 Adar , 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘JEWS’

Netanyahu Thanks French Jews for Warm Welcome

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu met with French Jewish leaders Monday morning and said that that terrorism will spread and worsen if the world does not join forces to fight it.

“Israel supports Europe in the struggle against terrorism and the time has come for Europe to support Israel in the exact same struggle, he said.

The Prime Minister tried to make believe that French officials did not want him to attend yesterday’s massive solidarity rally and said, “As soon as the security problem was resolved, thus allowing me to come, it was natural that I come here, it was important that I come here and therefore I came here.

“There is great significance in what the world saw, the Prime Minister of Israel marching with all the world leaders in a united effort against terrorism, or at least in a call for unity.”

Prime Minister Netanyahu also told French leaders, “Yesterday’s event in the La Victoire synagogue was emotional. I was also moved at the meeting with the bereaved families. I embraced the two brothers and I told them that I understand their feelings very well and that the entire Jewish People embraces the families. This was a moment of genuine Jewish solidarity. The visit to Paris was also a moment of general solidarity with humanity.”

Venez à la Maison en Israël

Saturday, January 10th, 2015

It always surprises me that all the Jews didn’t run away from Germany before the Holocaust began. I don’t mean when it was too late and they couldn’t, but when the antisemitism was already starting to be overt and unavoidable.

I know that Aliyah from France is up, but we’re talking about a few thousand people a year out of half a million – and this is when at least 40% of all racist crimes in France have been against Jews.

There’s no denying that there’s something naively optimistic about us Jews. We always think the situation will get better, but sometimes the writing is on the wall, like it is in France.

I’m sure there are French Jews who are looking at the massive support rally and think that France is finally at a turning point, and it will now begin to truly fight the Islamic terrorism in its midst, and once again Paris will be safe(r) for Jews.

Perhaps. Or perhaps it’s too late.

Picking up and leaving isn’t easy. The well-off French Jews probably all have homes in Netanya and Jerusalem already, but it’s the middle-class that has a problem.

Israel needs to make a special effort to bring them all over to Israel successfully. We must make sure they have jobs, homes, and not face a drastic drop in their lifestyle, just because they are making Aliyah (basically against their will).

The Russian and Ethiopian aliyahs had their unique challenges and Israel rose to meet them.

Massive French Aliyah will have its own unique challenges too, and the country must begin preparing for it, as well as convincing our French brethren that it is time to come home. 10,000 French Jews should not be the goal. Half a million French Jews should be our goal.

I don’t know much French, but just for you guys I’ll do my part just to make sure you all feel just a little more comfortable: Bienvenue à la maison.

I hope I wrote that right, but if I didn’t, try this on for size:
ברוכים הבאים הביתה.

The Day Jews Prayed in a Minyan on the Temple Mount

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

The issue of whether or not to allow Jews to pray on the Temple Mount is bound to come up for heated discussion before the elections March 17, but a rarely shown photograph proves that Jews once managed to pray there with a minyan, the minimum of 10 men needed for public prayer.

Jewish Home Knesset Member Uri Ariel and Likud MK Moshe Feiglin have been the most prominent legislators insisting that Israel change the “status quo” and allow Jews to pray at the holy site.

The official status quo, as reported here several weeks ago, has been replaced by a new status quo in which Jews still are not allowed to pray on the Temple Mount but also are restricted in their visits, even without praying.

The police implemented the new and unofficial status quo by limiting the number of Jews at the site and often closing it to Jews for reasons of “security,” meaning they don’t want to deal with Muslim rioters.

The 1995 peace treaty between Israel and Jordan not only does not specifically prohibit prayer by non-Muslims but also leaves it open as a possibility.

Paragraph 3 of the treaty states:

The Parties will act together to promote interfaith relations among the three monotheistic religions, with the aim of working towards religious understanding, moral commitment, freedom of religious worship, and tolerance and peace.

Regardless, the government policy not long after the Six-Day War in 1967 was to ban Jews form praying there. However, visiting was common.

Amos A., now in his 60s, told The Jewish Press that his father took him to all of the holy sites where Jordan had barred Jews. ”We went to the Patriarchs Cave in Hevron, Rachel’s Tomb at Bethlehem and the Temple Mount. No one said a word.”

He added that he and his father did not pray on the Temple Mount.

At that time, the Chief Rabbinate ruled that it is forbidden for Jews even to visit the Temple Mount, because of all kinds of issues of impurity and prohibitions of any Jew to walk on the ruins over the area where the High Priest entered only once a year, on Yom Kippur.

Very few rabbis were willing to question the opinion of the Rabbinate at the time, but that has changed in recent years. There now is an increasing number of prominent national religious rabbis who permit walking in certain areas of the holy site. Some also permit praying on condition of immersion in a ritual bath beforehand

Around 1980, give or take year, a group of 10 Jewish men, some posing as tourists, formed a minyan and prayed on the Temple Mount, as seen in the photograph above.

Yisrael Medad, a resident of Samaria, a former activist and now a blogger whose writing also appears on The Jewish Press, was one of the 10 men who formed a minyan.

The prayer service took place between 1979 and 1981, as he recalls. The picture shows nine men, with Medad on the far right. The 10th men was the photographer.

“It was one of the very, very few times that Jews have prayed on the Temple Mount,” Medad told The Jewish Press. “The group sneaked in and was able to pray until a Muslim guard was getting very upset and told us to stop. We motioned to him to wait because we were in the middle of the Amidah prayer,” the silent prayer in which interruptions are not allowed.

Medad said the guard “may have simply thought we were just looking around and not praying, but when he realized what was happening, he called the police, who hauled the men away.”

NY Legislators Ask Jews to Attend Police Officer’s Funeral

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind called on the Jewish community to attend the funeral of an assassinated New York police officer.

“The brave men and women of the NYPD risk their lives every day to protect us. We value them and stand with them,” Hikind, a Democrat who represents Brooklyn, said in a statement issued Monday. “We are more than appreciative of what New York’s Finest do and we should convey that. Their loss is our loss.”

The funeral for NYPD officer Wenjian Liu is scheduled for this Sunday in Brooklyn although the viewing of the body will take place on Saturday morning.

Liu and his partner, Rafael Ramos, were shot to death inside their patrol car on Dec. 20 by a gunman who had posted online about plans to attack police.

Ramos’ funeral took place on Saturday, Dec. 27, which is the Jewish Sabbath.

New York Councilman David Greenfield, who represents Brooklyn, also called on his Jewish constituents to attend the funeral.

“The last funeral was on Shabbos, so we could not attend. This one is literally in our neighborhood. We need to show our “hakaros hatov” to the late Detective Wenjian Liu and provide “chizuk” to the NYPD during this difficult time,” Greenfield said in a statement, using the Hebrew words for appreciation and strength.

Israeli Population: 6.2 Million Jews and 1.7 Million Arabs

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

The population of Israel two days before the end of the calendar year stands at 8.3 million, 170,000 more than at the end of last year, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics.

The 6.2 million Jews in the country make up 74.9 percent of the total, and the 1.7 million Arabs comprise 20.4 percent of the population. Christians, other religions and those not identifying with a religion comprise 4.3 percent of the census.

The figures include all of Jerusalem but not Judea and Samaria.

The number of Christians, non-Jews and non-Muslims rose 0.3 percent while Jews and Muslims both registered marginal decreases in terms of the percentage of the population.

Anti-Semitic Vandalism in Chicago and Philadelphia

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

Religious leaders, political officials and community members gathered in a Philadelphia suburb to denounce anti-Semitic vandalism at a Jewish family’s home, where “Move Jew” was spray painted on the home’s garage door.

“It was shocking,” Samantha Raker, who lives at the Yardley Pennsylvania home with her father, Michael, said at the rally.

In Chicago, a synagogue and more than 10 nearby residential garages were vandalized with anti-Semitic graffiti.

Congregation Atereth Yehoshua and the garages in the heavily Jewish neighborhood of West Rogers Park were defaced over the weekend with slurs that included a Star of David accompanied by the words “F**k U,” according to Fox 32, a Fox News affiliate.

On Monday, Chicago’s Department of Streets and Sanitation painted over the graffiti.

Preserved Polish Synagogue to Become Jewish Museum

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland plans to open a new Jewish museum in a preserved baroque synagogue built in the 17th century in eastern Poland.

Great Synagogue in Leczna, in Lublin province, was mostly destroyed during and after World War II. In the 1950s and 1960s it was reconstructed, retaining the most important architectural elements of the former synagogue, including its wooden ceilings, the bimah and the Torah ark.

Since 1966, the synagogue has housed a regional museum, which has in its collection some valuable Judaica.

In 2013, the synagogue was transferred to Jewish community and was placed under the responsibility of the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland.

The Foundation has proposed re-opening the museum in the building with a focus on the Jewish community of the town and plans to open the revamped museum in 2016.

It could become part of the Chassidic Route – the project implemented by the Foundation which traces the Jewish communities of southeastern Poland. The project has been joined by 28 communities.

 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/preserved-polish-synagogue-to-become-jewish-museum/2014/12/29/

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