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January 23, 2017 / 25 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

Trump Tweets Japanese Billionaire to Invest in US, Creating 50,000 Jobs

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

Billionaire founder and CEO of Japanese multinational telecommunications and Internet corporation Softbank Masayoshi Son entered the Trump Tower Tuesday afternoon, for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump. A few minutes later, literally (at 2:10 PM ET), Trump tweeted: “Masa (SoftBank) of Japan has agreed to invest $50 billion in the U.S. toward businesses and 50,000 new jobs…” He followed it up with “Masa said he would never do this had we (Trump) not won the election!”

According to Reuters, the investment is likely to involve telecoms giant Sprint Corp, in which SoftBank owns 82%, would try again to merge with T-Mobile US, a deal that was previously killed by US government regulators. Apparently, the new White House (PT) resident plans to ease up on those regulations this time. One of the president-elect’s campaign promises was to rescind the Obama Administration’s over-regulation of business. Whether or not US consumers would also fare better with fewer regulations.

Standing with the visiting tycoon at the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, Donald Trump said, “Ladies and gentlemen, this is Masa from SoftBank of Japan, and he’s just agreed to invest $50 billion in the United States and 50,000 jobs.”

According to the Wall Street Journal, the SoftBank investment is part of a $100 billion investment fund “Masa” is setting up with a Saudi Arabian fund.

“We are going to invest $50 billion into the US and commit to create 50,000 new jobs,” Son said at the Trump lobby, noting that the investment was made possible due to his expectation of seeing a lot of “deregulation” under the Trump administration.

No timeline was given for the investment, but Sprint shares reached their highest level in 2.5 years, closing up 1.5% at $8.17 in heavy trading. Shares of T-Mobile US were up 1.8% at $55.99.

Incidentally, earlier on Tuesday Trump rebuked Boeing for charging too much for the Air Force 1, sending its stock plummeting. So this is definitely going to be a memorable ride.

David Israel

Israel’s Unemployment Rate Drops to Record Low in February

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Israel’s unemployment rate has dropped to a record low in February 2014, down to 4.9% compared to 5.4% in January for people aged 25-64.

According to a seasonally adjusted study released by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) last week, over 3.5 million people out of 8.1 million people are employed in Israel. The study found that 216,000 people were unemployed February, approximately 3,000 fewer than in January.

Among males aged 25-64, the employment rate rose to 81.1% and among females aged 25-64, the employment rate rose to 71%. The CBS survey found that unemployment also declined for those people aged 15 and over, from 5.9% in January to 5.8% in February. The employment rate for that age group rose to 60.5% in February.

Four out five people (ages 25 to 64) are currently employed, with participation in the labor force rising to a record high of 80% in February according to CBS data.

In addition, the CBS survey found that among employed men, 87% work full time and 13% work part time. Among employed women, 67% work full time and 33% work part-time.

The number of employed people who usually work full time (35 hours or more per week), increased by 0.8% compared with January – an additional 21,000 employed people.

Israel’s unemployment rates have been trending low the past two years, a source in the Central Bureau of Statistics told Tazpit News Agency.

Anav Silverman, Tazpit News Agency

The Best Job for 2013 and Beyond

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

U.S. News and World Report advises that if you want a “hot career,” you should become a registered nurse, software developer, or pharmacist. But they’re wrong. They are missing what America needs the most today, and will need even more tomorrow.

Which job will always be in demand, assure job satisfaction, impact the world, and may even make you rich?

To answer that question, look at the job market the same way an entrepreneur examines the commercial situation. Look for the biggest hole and then find the tools needed to fill it. Look around your workplace, look at your colleagues, and even at your bosses. What do you see?

The demise of leadership.

Leadership is a job

Sadly, people today, especially those just entering the workforce, lack the skills to lead their fellow workers. Having grown up in a society of entitlement, they learned that someone else is responsible for fixing every problem.

No job? The government should fix it. No health insurance? Other taxpayers should pay. Child fails in school? Blame the teacher. Declaring bankruptcy? It’s the bank’s fault for lending you the money.

The list goes on and on. We have a crisis of leadership because today’s young adults grew up in a society where they watched their parents blame others for every problem, and where they themselves never had to work hard. Without mentors and examples to lead the path of leadership, how will today’s youth grow into leaders?

What is a leader?

A leader is a dreamer. He must believe in himself and in others. He must love to teach and learn. He listens and speaks sparingly. He sets standards for himself and he values character. He’s a giver, not a taker.

The demise of leadership in the past 25 years has created fabulous job opportunities. Companies without visionary leaders will eventually fail. So don’t train yourself for a job qualification, because all you will do is work for one of the destined-to-fail firms. Rather, learn how to become a leader and you will find companies not looking to give you a job, but begging you to guide them.

Countless books have been written about how to become a leader. Others have been written about the benefits of having great leaders. Two of my favorites are Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter by Liz Wiseman and Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… And Others Don’t  by Jim Collins.

I can tell you that as a financial adviser on Wall Street for over 20 years, I have witnessed the decline of quality leaders both in business and politics. If you can fill the shoes of the great men and women who led us in the previous generation, then you will change the world.

And that’s not a job. It’s a life.

Doug Goldstein, CFP®

Some Likud MKs Explain Their Positions to Voters – in English

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

On Tuesday night, around 100 English speaking Likud members and supporters got to hear MK Tzipi Hotoveli, MK Gila Gamliel and Jerusalem City Council member Yair Gabai address some of the major issues of the day, in English.

The event, which was held at the Ramada Hotel in Jerusalem, and lasted over two hours, was organized and M.C.ed by Fred Moncharsh and Danny Gottlieb.

Part of the purpose of the event was to allow the MKs to present their platforms and positions to English speaking Likud voters ahead of the upcoming Likud primaries, which is when their jobs go on the line.

While more MKs had originally said they planned to show up, only two showed up in the end.

It was clear that Hotoveli, Gamliel and Gabai appreciated the opportunity to speak to an English speaking audience, and Gamliel clearly put in the extra effort to ensure she had coherent and comprehensive answers ready in English, a language she speaks less fluently than the other two.

After the event, JewishPress.com spoke with MK Hotoveli and asked about some of the outstanding issues that the Likud never managed to complete in this term.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Gaming the System

Monday, November 5th, 2012

One of the more troubling issues for me about the current right-wing push for all of their students to learn Torah full time for as long as possible (well into their marriage and long after having a number of children to support) is the way in which this is financed.

I have long ago expressed my disagreement with this policy as it is currently applied. The idea of directing every single male in all of Jewry into a life of Torah study as the ideal (to the exclusion of any other productive endeavor) is anathema to the very idea of a Jewish nation.

I am not going to go into the details as to why I feel that way in this post other than to say that I do not believe God wants His people to not fully utilize all the individually different talents He has granted them. Every individual Jew is different with talents in a broad range of different fields. They ought to choose those fields where their talents lie.

For those whose talents are uniquely geared to Torah study – that is the best use of their time. But for those whose talents are suited elsewhere, they should find out what they are, utilize them that way and thus make a far greater contribution to God, Judaism, and the Jewish people.

The Lakewood ideal is to sublimate those talents into full time Torah study.

One of the terrible consequences of this push for every male to spend his life learning Torah is the material cost. This is most acutely felt in Israel. But Americans who do this aren’t exactly living the good life either. Learning full time means they do not earn any money outside of a meager stipend a Yeshiva like Lakewood pays. Those funds cannot possibly support them enough to put a roof over their heads, put food on the table, send their children to private religious schools (even those with very low tuition) and other expenses required just to live a bare-bones modest lifestyle.

While it is true that many Kollel wives work to support their husbands they rarely make enough to support their very large families. Sometimes there are parents and in-laws that help. But that too is not enough, and is drying up a source of income with every succeeding generation. More than ever young people are being convinced to spend their lives in a Beis HaMedrash well into their prime earning years.

One of the ways Lakewood helps its Avreichim is by teaching them how to game the system. By this I mean applying for every possible federal dollar available to students who need financial aid to continue their advanced studies beyond high school. One of the most commonly used federal programs is the Pell Grant.

The Pell Grant was created 40 years ago by then Senator Claiborne Pell to provide financial aid to low income students enabling them to access higher education. While these Avrechim do apparently qualify under Pell Grant guidelines I nevertheless find this to be a misuse of the system.

I do not accuse them of stealing from the government. But there is no way that the Pell grant was ever intended to be used as supplemental income. Which is for the most part how it is used.

A lengthy article in the Forward has taken a closer look at this situation. Here are some of their troubling observations.

Said Heather Valentine, vice president of public policy at the Council for Opportunity in Education put it:

“It’s not just about creating the access to higher education… It’s about making sure that students are… graduating and getting placed in jobs.”

I think that Lakewood and the rest of the Yeshiva world that promotes full time learning understands this. This is how they have addressed the issue:

Proponents of yeshiva education point out that critical thinking and argumentative skills that develop while poring over Talmud — not to mention grueling day-long study sessions broken only for prayer and meals — serve students well for careers in many professions, particularly business and law.

In her book, “Heart of the Stranger: A Portrait of Lakewood’s Orthodox Community,” Botein-Furrevig said the current CEO of BMG (Lakewood), Kotler’s grandson Aaron Kotler, told her that BMG has “a successful job placement service” for graduates and that many students go on to careers in “business, the rabbinate, academia, medicine, finance, law or technology.”

Is this not Gneivas Daas (deception)? I have no doubt that there have been and still are students who have attended Yeshivos like Lakewood and have gone on to a wide variety of successful careers like those mentioned by Lakewood CEO, Rabbi Aaron Kotler.

But to imply that they have a successful job placement service in the fields of medicine, law and technology when that is not the case is simply wrong.

I believe the opposite is true. With the exception of helping their students find jobs in Chinuch or similar jobs, they do nothing to support students seeking careers in any of those fields.

They don’t even approve of schools like Touro and consider a lifestyle outside of learning to be less than desirable. I will never forget the remarks Lakewood Rosh HaYeshiva Rav Malkiel Kotler made along those lines about Dr. Bernard Lander – founder of Touro upon his passing

I understand the need for Lakewood and similar Yeshivos to help their students find legitimate and legal sources of financial aid. But I do not understand misleading the public about how these schools live up to the expectations of helping their students find decent careers – when doing so is anathema to its philosophy.

If that isn’t Genivas Daas, I do know what is. Need based stealing does not justify doing it. Even if it is done for the lofty goal of learning Torah.

Visit Emes Ve-Emunah.

Harry Maryles

Daniel Pipes: Superficiality Reigns Before the Election

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

It happens every four years, as U.S. presidential elections roll around: I feel like a stranger.

That’s because news reports blare out what’s not of interest: trivial statistics (171,000 jobs added in October; jobless rate up 0.1 percent to 7.9 percent), biographical irrelevancies (claims that Romney outsourced jobs to other countries when at Bain Capital), and forgettable gaffes (Obama saying that “Voting is the best revenge”).

This limited discussion misses two main points: First, the quite contrary philosophies of Democrats and Republicans. Where’s the discussion of equality vs. liberty, the federal government vs. federalism, much less about topics like education, immigration and Islamism? What are the candidates’ criteria for appointing federal judges, their ways to solve the debt crisis, or their guidelines for the use of force abroad? What about the scandalous administration reaction to the events in Benghazi on Sep. 11, 2012? It almost seems that the candidates tacitly agreed to ignore the most important and interesting issues.

Second, the debate ignores that the candidates are not isolated individuals but heads of large teams. Who are the candidates for secretary of state, defense, and treasury, and for attorney general? Who are likely heads of the National Security Council and the Council of Economic Advisers? What are the implications of each team taking office?

Let’s hope that voters can see their way through this miasma of superficiality. (November 3, 2012).

Originally published at National Review Online and DanielPipes.org on November 3, 2012.

Daniel Pipes

Starving Amidst Plenty

Monday, August 27th, 2012

There are two types of societies, production societies and rationing societies. The production society is concerned with taking more territory, exploiting that territory to the best of its ability and then discovering new techniques for producing even more. The rationing society is concerned with consolidating control over all existing resources and rationing them out to the people.

The production society values innovation because it is the only means of sustaining its forward momentum. If the production society ceases to be innovative, it will collapse and default to a rationing society. The rationing society however is threatened by innovation because innovation threatens its control over production.

Socialist or capitalist monopolies lead to rationing societies where production is restrained and innovation is discouraged. The difference between the two is that a capitalist monopoly can be overcome. A socialist monopoly however is insurmountable because it carries with it the full weight of the authorities and the ideology that is inculcated into every man, woman and child in the country.

We have become a rationing society. Our industries and our people are literally starving in the midst of plenty. Farmers are kept from farming, factories are kept from producing and businessmen are kept from creating new companies and jobs. This is done in the name of a variety of moral arguments, ranging from caring for the less fortunate to saving the planet. But rhetoric is only the lubricant of power. The real goal of power is always power. Consolidating production allows for total control through the moral argument of rationing, whether through resource redistribution or cap and trade.

The politicians of a rationing society may blather on endlessly about increasing production, but it’s so much noise, whether it’s a Soviet Five Year Plan or an Obama State of the Union Address. When they talk about innovation and production, what they mean is the planned production and innovation that they have decided should happen on their schedule. And that never works.

You can ration production, but that’s just another word for poverty. You can’t ration innovation, which is why the aggressive attempts to put low mileage cars on the road have failed. As the Soviet Union discovered, you can have rationing or innovation, but you can’t have both at the same time. The total control exerted by a monolithic entity, whether governmental or commercial, does not mix well with innovation.

The rationing society is a poverty generator because not only does it discourage growth, its rationing mechanisms impoverish existing production with massive overhead. The process of rationing existing production requires a bureaucracy for planning, collecting and distributing that production that begins at a ratio of the production and then increases without regard to the limitations of that production.

Paradoxically the rationing infrastructure increases in direct proportion to the falloff of production as lower production requires even greater rationing. This is what we are seeing now in the United States, in a weak economy, there is greater justification for the expansion of rationing mechanisms. And the worse the economy becomes, the bigger government will become to “compensate” for the problems of the economy.

In a production society, the role of government is to expand the territories of exploitation and to protect those territories. In a rationing society, the role of government is to control the available quantities of production with a view to distributing them fairly. Naturally, the rationers, as always, get the best rations. In a production society, government is a means of protecting everyone’s ability to produce. In a rationing society, government prevents the bigger from grabbing the rations of the smaller and protects everyone from grabbing all the rations at once and starving to death.

The sort of society we have is fit for passengers adrift at sea on a lifeboat parceling out their last crackers. It is an emergency society for the lost and the starving. And perversely we are starving amidst plenty.

The rationing society discourages people from farming and encourages them to peer in each other’s mouths to see who is eating more than his fair share. In the rationing society everyone is certain that they are not getting their fair share and eager to sign on to initiatives to get their group’s fair share. In a rationing society everyone is an informer because everyone’s livelihood depends on informing on others.

Daniel Greenfield

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/sultan-knish/starving-amidst-plenty/2012/08/27/

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