web analytics
December 2, 2016 / 2 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Judean Desert’

40-Yr-Old Hiker Dies in Judean Desert Fall

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

A 40-year-old man fell to his death on Tuesday while hiking along a trail next to Wadi Og in the Judean Desert, Israeli rescue officials said.

The man apparently slipped and fell from a height of about 50 meters (164 feet) while moving along the walking path. His identity has not been released.

Thousands of tourists and Israeli citizens are out in force this week during the intermediary days of the Passover holiday.

It is not unusual for search and rescue units to be called out a number of times during the week in order to help out people who are unused to the terrain – and so it was on Tuesday as well.

Earlier in the day a woman with diabetes had to be evacuated from Wadi Qelt, also in the Judean Desert, after her blood sugar level suddenly dropped to a dangerously low level while hiking in the wadi.

In the same area, a 51-year-old woman was evacuated to Jerusalem’s Hadassah Medical Center after breaking her leg.

Late Monday night, five men were rescued by a volunteer unit after a night of rappelling to extract them from a location at the Tor Stream, near the Dead Sea.

In northern Israel a woman was taken to a local hospital near the Golan Heights after falling and injuring her leg at the Zavitan Stream. The evacuation involved at least six people and a stretcher to move the woman from the remote area.

A spokesperson for the Golan Rescue Unit told media that a 70-year-old man was also evacuated after he fainted while hiking near the Yehudia Stream.

Jewish Press Staff

Researchers Find Ancient Fabrics in Colors Noted in Jewish Sources

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

Centuries-old fabrics identified by Israel Antiquities Authority researchers include one that may have been made by means of a technique similar to making the tekhelet (blue)in tzitzit, the fringes that the Bible commands be worn on four-cornered garments.

To date, only two pieces of fabric treated with actual dye-murex have been found in Israel

The fabrics identified by Dr. Na‘ama Sukenik represent the most prestigious colors in antiquity – indigo, purple and crimson, – that are mentioned in Jewish sources

Thousands of fabrics dating to the Roman period have been discovered in the Judean Desert and regions of the Negev and the Arava. So far only two were colored with dye extracted from the murex snail. Now, within the framework of a study conducted by Dr. Sukenik, three other rare fabrics belonging to pieces of prestigious textiles were exposed that might have been used as clothing in the Roman period.

Dr. Sukenik’s doctoral dissertation was supervised by Professor Zohar Amar and Dr. David Illuz of Bar-Ilan University, and the textiles were examined by Dr. Orit Shamir, Curator of Organic Materials at the Israel Antiquities Authority.

These prestigious textiles, from the Wadi Murabba‘at caves located south of Qumran, were revealed in a study that analyzed the dye of 180 textiles specimens from the Judean Desert caves. Among the many textiles, most of which were dyed using substances derived from plants, were two purple-bordeaux colored textiles – parts of tunics that were double dyed utilizing two of the most expensive materials in antiquity – Murex trunculus (Hexaplex trunculus) and American Cochineal insect .

Photo: Courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

Photo: Courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

A third textile, made of wool, indicating the thread fibers were dyed by exposing them to sunlight or heated after having been dyed, represent another use of the murex snail for achieving a shade of blue, and it is possible that the item in question is an indigo fabric made by means of a technique similar to making the tekhelet (blue)in a tzitzit.

The importance of this fabric is extremely significant as there are practically no parallels for it in the archaeological record.

Dr. Sukenik, assisted by Dr. Alexander Varvak, examined the colors using advanced analytical instrumentation for identifying dye substances (HPLC).

The testing of the fabrics, performed by Dr. Orit Shamir of the Israel Antiquities Authority, revealed that the two purple textiles were spinning in a unique manner characteristic of imported textiles, whereas the blue textile was spinning in the same fashion as the local textiles.

Of all of the dyes that were in use, purple is considered the most prestigious color of the earlier periods, but it seems the public’s fondness for this reached its peak in the Hellenistic-Roman period. The purple dyed fabrics attested to the prestige of the garment and the social status of its owner.

There were times when the masses were forbidden from dressing in purple clothing, which was reserved for only the emperor and his family. These measures only served to increase the popularity of that color, the price of which soared and was equal to that of gold.

It is difficult to know for certain how such prestigious fabrics came to be in the Murabba‘at caves. They might have been part of the property belonging to Jewish refugees from the time of the Bar-Kokhba revolt and demonstrate their economic prosperity prior to the outbreak of the uprising.

Another possibility is that they were part of the possessions of a small Roman unit, which on the basis of the artifacts was stationed in the Murabba‘at caves following the Bar Kokhba revolt.  It is likely these same soldiers brought some of their belongings from overseas to Israel and others they purchased from the local Jewish population during their service in the country.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/researchers-find-ancient-fabrics-in-colors-noted-in-jewish-sources/2013/12/31/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: