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April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Kate Middleton’

Britons in Suspense over Possibility of a ‘Royal Circumcision’

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

King George started circumcising newly-born princes 150 years ago, Princess Diana rejected the idea. Britain now wonders if Kate and William will or not. One thing for sure, it won’t be a Brit Mila.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, once known as Prince William and Kate Middleton, are keeping Britain in suspense over whether they will circumcise their new baby boy, Prince George Alexander Louis.

Most British royalty have adopted the practice of circumcision as a matter of status, even since King George I adopted it 250 years ago.

Queen Victoria might have wanted to adopt the practice of circumcision because she “basically got it into her head that her children were the sons of David,” British pediatrician and author Dr. Harvey Karp told the Huffington Post.

A rabbi circumcised  Prince Charles in 1948, and Princes Andrew and Edward also were also circumcised.

Most British royalty have adopted the practice of circumcision as a matter of status. After all, not doing so might be disrespectful to the legend of King George but the rebellious Princess Diana reportedly refused to continue the practice, which may affect the Duke and Duchess’ decision.

“It’s very unlikely we’re going to be seeing [circumcision] this time around,” Dr. Karp said,  but added that if the little prince is circumcised, it could spark a fad, which he said  everyone will start calling “the Prince George.”

The issue at first glance seems totally banal. What difference does it make, especially to Jews, if they bring in a mohel for the king-to-be?

Considering the anti-Semitic campaign around the world to prohibit circumcision as some kind of barbaric mutilation that violates the human rights of a baby who has no freedom to choose, the royal decision could have affect the war on the Jewish rite, also practiced by most Muslims.

Tons of research, which has shown that circumcision not only is not dangerous or unhealthy but often can help the health of a child have, hampered the anti-circumcision crowd.

They have been forced to resort to the “free choice” argument, which makes their movement look even more absurd than it is.

Britons who are not Jewish or Muslim have showed less interest n circumcising their children in recent decades.

Maurice Levenson, the secretary of the Initiation Society, an Anglo-Jewish organization that represents about 55 mohels, told the London Telegraph, “The great majority of the enquiries we receive come from those of the Jewish faith, Muslims, Afro-Caribbeans and Americans, where circumcision remains popular.”

False reports that Kate Middleton, now the Duchess of Cambridge, is Jewish still are floating, partly because her mother’s maiden name was “Goldsmith.” Jewish-sounding or not, she was  Christian, scotching the idea that the new prince might be Britain’s first Jewish king.

That  does not mean he cannot be circumcised.

It will cost the royal family about $1,100, not including wine and herring,  to circumcision the prince at the Portland Hospital’s private maternity ward, where he was born. The ward, by the way, is named the Lindo Wing after a Jewish donor, but that won’t cut the mustard for anyone trying to claim he is a Yid.

Presumably, Buckingham Palace has the shekels to afford the circumcision.

But no has asked the real question that should be on everyone’s minds: If Prince George Alexander Louis is circumcised, where the ceremony include Metzizah b’peh?

Kate Gave Birth in a Jewish-Funded Hospital Wing

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

When the duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton was rushed to the Lindo Wing at St. Mary’s Hospital early Monday, anxious to avoid hundreds of paparazzi camping outside, she almost certainly missed the little plaque at the entrance.

The memorial pays tribute to the anonymous donor “who was not unmindful of his neighbors’ needs” and who paid for the wing in 1937.

In fact he wasn’t so anonymous: the wing is named after him. Frank Charles Lindo was a wealthy Jew, descended on his mother Adeline’s side from the Heilbut family, and on his father Charles’s side, it appears, from one of London’s most famous Sephardi families. While it is not clear exactly how he is related, the Lindo name is particularly associated with the silver Lindo Lamp, the earliest known English menorah, which was commissioned in 1709 on the marriage of Elias Lindo to Rachel Lopes Ferreira.

Born in 1872, Frank Lindo married Violet Portman, a member of a British aristocratic family and a member of the board of management at St Mary’s. When Lindo died in 1938, he had donated £111,500 to the hospital, including £5,000 on the morning of the opening of the Lindo Wing so that it could open free of debt. While nowadays considered state-of-the-art, at the time it was meant for  ”patients of moderate means” who could not afford private care but were too well off to be treated in a charity hospital for the “deserving poor.”

In his will, Lindo left his house at Aldeburgh to the hospital as a convalescent home for the nursing staff, with an endowment fund of £25,000 for its maintenance.

“His gifts, sympathy and understanding made possible the erection and equipment of this building for the relief of sickness and suffering,” says the memorial plaque, “and will remain for all time a monument of his outstanding generosity.”

Surely he would have shepped much nachas from the royal baby born in the birthing suite he funded.

Duchess Kate Had a Boy, Call the Mohel

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Duchess Kate Middleton gave birth to a baby boy on Monday. The baby weighed in at 8 lb. 6oz.

No word yet if the local Rabbi will be called in to perform a circumcision.

It’s been the tradition of the British Royal Family for the past 150 years to circumcise their boys, though rumor has it that Princess Diana broke that tradition with William and Harry.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/duchess-kate-had-a-boy-call-the-mohel/2013/07/22/

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