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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Kiryat Malachi’

Evacuating Jewish Homes and Yishai Live With Nachum Segal

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

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Yishai presents an interview with Gilead Mooseek, a resident of Kiryat Malachi.  Mooseek, who had to evacuate his home in Kiryat Malachi, discusses firsthand what it is like to be forced from your home and also what it is like to work in an environment where many co-workers are Arabs.  At 13:00 Yishai presents an interview that he gave earlier this week to Nachum Segal on his show JM in the AM.  Yisahi talks with Segal about Iron Dome, the call up of IDF reserve soldiers, and whether a peace deal between Israel and Hamas would even work.  Don’t miss this segment!

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Post-Ceasefire, Outraged Citizens Take to Streets

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

Outraged residents of the beleaguered cities of Sderot, Ashkelon, and Kiryat Malachi took to the streets, decrying the government’s decision to enter into a ceasefire with Hamas.

Many of whom had been holed up in bunkers for eight straight days of rocket lobbies and emergency alerts in their cities, the residents demanded protection from the government and urged Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to conduct a ground war in Gaza.

The Final Deaths of the Mumbai Massacre

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

In an odd conflation of coincidences, Israeli and Indian violence have been ricocheting across the continents.

Mira Scharf, the wife of a Chabad rabbi in India and a “shlucha” (a female emissary) to New Dehli, India, returned home to Israel this month for a memorial service for the Mumbai Chabad Rabbi Gavriel Holtzberg and his wife, Rivka.  The Holtzbergs were brutally murdered in the Mumbai massacre exactly four years ago.

While in Israel, Scharf, a pregnant mother of three, became one of the first Israeli victims of this current Hamas-Israel violence. She and two others were killed in a rocket attack in Kiryat Malachi on Thursday, November 15.

And tonight, the circle closes with the hanging death of the last surviving Indian gunman from that brutal three-day rampage on Mumbai that claimed the lives of 166 people, including Rabbi Holtzberg  and his wife.

Pakistani citizen Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab was hanged during the night in a secretive procedure in India, following a four year trial.  Kasab was sentenced to death by the Bombay High Court last October.  He was convicted on various charges, including waging war against India.  His mercy petition was rejected by the President of India, on November 5.

Sentenced to death by the Bombay High Court in last October, Kasab was convicted on charges ranging from treason to waging war against India. His appeal in the Supreme Court was turned down in August.

“It is a warning for those trying to instigate terror attacks in India, as well as succour for those who have suffered due to these attacks,” said BJP vice-president Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi.

As many as 166 people were killed when Lashkar-e-Taiba militants attacked different targets in India’s financial hub on Nov. 26, 2008. Over 300 people were injured in the attacks.

Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab before his capture.

Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab before his capture.

Kasab was filmed walking through Mumbai’s main train station carrying an AK-47 assault rifle and a knapsack on his back.  During his interrogations, many of which were filmed, Kasab admitted his involvement in the murders, described his role in the massacre.

When police asked Kasab, 21 at the time, what he understood about jihad, he told them, “it [Jihad] is about killing and getting killed and becoming famous.” “Come, kill and die after a killing spree. By this one will become famous and will also make Allah proud.”

Muslim Pakistan and Hindu India are locked in violent religious hatred similar to that between the Arab Palestinians and Israel. The Pakistani government chose not to claim Kasab’s body, and consequently he was buried in India.  His was the last death of the Mumbai massacre.

4th Israeli Dies in Kiryat Malachi Attack

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

A fourth Israeli died that had been injured in the strike on the Kiryat Malachi apartment.

Fajr Rocket Intercepted En Route to Tel Aviv

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Live updates from Ma’an

10:45: New Israeli airstrike in eastern Shajaiya neighborhood of Gaza City; medics say six injured including two children and a woman.

10:25: Hamas’ al-Qassam Brigades claimed responsibility for launching hundreds of projectiles including Katyusha rockets toward Ashkelon, Beer Sheva, Ashdod and south of Tel Aviv.

The group said it launched 10 Grad rockets at Ashkelon, 19 rockets toward Sufa and Nir Yitzhak, and five rockets toward Kiryat Gat near the Gaza border.

10:17: Thousands of Palestinians have turned out to mourn the passing of Ahmad al-Jaabari, the Hamas leader who was killed Wednesday.

10:11: Egypt has officially requested a meeting of the UN Security Council to discuss what it described as Israeli “aggression” on Gaza, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

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10:12 – Walla reported that a long-distance Fajr rocket aimed at the Tel Aviv area was intercepted by the Iron Dome system. The MDA EMT units are on high alert to respond to a possible hit. A Hamas source claims there have been three Farj firing this morning, and some 150 short range missiles. The Islamic Jihad has claimed 45 Grad launchings.

9:25 AM – Over the past few minutes there have been reports of rockets falling in Kiryat Gat, Netivot and the Ashkelon Coast Regional Council. No reports of casualties. Just now, the Iron Dome system intercepted two Grad rockets fired at Be’er Sheva.

Lachish Region Police Chief, Commander Alon Levavi, was at the scene in Kiryat Malachi and was adamant in his statement: “If the public had followed the instructions in this case (referring to the three killed and six injured from 2 Grad hits), we probably could have reported fewer casualties.”

Internal security Minister Yizhak Aharonovitch said: “We should applaud the military and the Iron Dome system.”

Aharonovitch added: “There is no magic solution to prevent rockets from falling on population centers. Occasionally a rocket will fall. But when I come here and see so many civilians just loitering around, I think it’s irresponsible.”

Regarding the Gaza operation, the minister said: “In my opinion, it will not end in two or three days.”

8:45 AM Three are reported dead in 2 rocket strikes on Kiryat Melachi. The building they were in was hit directly by a Grad rocket. The three were trapped under the collapsed building. Police forces are rushing to the site.

Another six persons, one of them a baby, received from severe to light injuries and are receiving emergency treatment. The baby’s injuries was described as “medium.”

In Ashdod two are lightly injured from a Grad rocket.

Kiryat Malachi (A) is

Kiryat Malachi is about 20 miles from the Gaza border.

A Different Kind Of Camp: An Interview with Yeshiva University’s Rabbi Kenneth Brander

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future seems to expand with each passing year.

Founded in 2005, the Center – among other activities – now educates hundreds of ordained rabbis through its Rabbinic Training Placement and Continuing Education program; sends 1,000 students every year to help communities around the world through its Experiential Education and Service Learning program; makes 60,000 shiurim of YU rabbis and others available online through YUTorah.org; helps YU students and alumni find their Intended through YUConnects.org; and sets up kollelim around the country through its Community Initiatives program.

This summer, the Center ran day camps in five Israeli development towns: Dimona, Arad, Kiryat Gat, Kiryat Malachi, and Beersheba. Staffed by 60 YU students, the camps serviced over 350 Israeli children.

The Jewish Press recently spoke with Rabbi Kenneth Brander, the Center’s dean, about the summer camps.

The Jewish Press: What was the logic behind Yeshiva University students from America organizing summer camps in Israel?

Rabbi Brander: One of the things that attracted the campers to our programs – each one was sold out and there were waiting lists – was the fact that you had American students coming over to Israel. It was cool that they were American.

Some of these kids have lived very challenging lives; they come from poor homes, foster homes, one-parent homes, etc. I’ll give you an example. We took the campers from Kiryat Gat and Kiryat Malachi to the airport to welcome in a Nefesh B’Nefesh flight; most of them had never been to an airport before.

Is the poverty really that bad in these cities?

There’s a significant divide between the wealth in the center of Israel and the south of Israel. The south is a very, very poor area. In a place like Dimona, two out of every three children are beneath the poverty line, which is significantly lower than the American poverty line.

One day, one of the kids from Dimona took a donkey to travel to camp. That’s what we’re talking about.

What’s the purpose of these camps?

They’re English-immersive summer camps. So, for example, we’ll take mishnayos and translate them into English.

Our other thing is that we want to build the campers’ self-esteem because they have very poor self-esteem. They’ve been told by everybody that they can’t accomplish – that for the rest of their lives they’re going to live in this cycle of poverty. But then, all of a sudden, they see – through arts and crafts, martial arts, dance, etc. – that they actually have skills and talents.

Are all the campers in the “poor self-esteem” or “troubled homes” categories?

They all come from challenging situations – some of the cities more than others. The population in Arad is nowhere near as financially challenged as the populations in the other camps. I would not put Arad and Dimona in the same category as Kiryat Gat, Kiryat Malachi and Beersheba.

In the latter cities, we only worked with kids who were basically on the cusp of failing out of school, who are classified by their schools as being in the “Nachshon group.” In Dimona and Arad, though, we had a mixture of all different kinds of kids.

Were these campers mostly Sephardim? Ashkenazim? Russian? Ethiopian?

It’s a klal Yisrael program. You have everyone. Development towns such as the ones we were in have a lot more Ethiopians and Russians than maybe other towns, but it’s a mixture….

You’ll also have kids who wear kippot along with kids who don’t. But I have to tell you – it’s such an unbelievable thing to see – even the kids who don’t wear kippot are very traditionally inclined. For example, they’ll say a berachah before they eat or they’ll put on tefillin in the morning. It’s an interesting perspective, which I don’t think we see as much in America.

What ages are the campers and what are the hours of these camps?

Ages 12 through 16 or 17. They start at eight in the morning and go to very late in the afternoon. But our students live in the towns, so the relationship doesn’t end at the end of the day. They hang out with our students on Shabbos or they’ll join us for Seudat Shlishit. It’s a fully immersive experience.

Immigrant Absorption Minister: ‘Ethiopian Immigrants Should Be Grateful To Israel’

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Immigrant Absorption Minister and Yisrael Beitenu MK Sofa Landver said on Wednesday that Ethiopian immigration representatives in the Knesset should be grateful to Israel.

Landver made the comments during an emergency session held by the Knesset Committee for Immigration, Absorption and Diaspora Affairs to investigate the issue of discrimination against Ethiopians in Kiryat Malachi. She was responding to an Ethiopian representative, Gadi Desta, who told the MKs that “apartheid” was taking place.

The emergency session was convened against the backdrop of a news report that local homeowners’ committees in Kiryat Malachi consistently refuse to sell or rent property to Ethiopians.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/immigrant-absorption-minister-ethiopian-immigrants-should-be-grateful-to-state/2012/01/11/

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