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August 21, 2014 / 25 Av, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Knesset Speaker’

Netanyahu Tells Israeli President: ‘I Put Together a Government’

Saturday, March 16th, 2013

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, arrived on Saturday night at the presidential residence in Jerusalem, to officially inform President Shimon Peres and acting Knesset Speaker Benjamin Ben-Eliezer that he had succeeded in forming a government.

“As you know I was able to form a government,” Netanyahu to Peres at the beginning of their meeting. “You handed me this assignment and I carried it out.”

Netanyahu added: “We are facing a critical year in defense, economics and the peace efforts, and in the desire of the citizens of Israel to bring about change. There’s cooperation in this Government, and I believe that we can bring a new message in all the areas for all the citizens of Israel, this is my assignment and I know that this is your prayer as well.”

The president thanked the prime minister for his statement and said: “I witnessed the labor pains in the process of forming this government on time, and I congratulate you for succeeding to form the government in a timely fashion. The task of forming a government is complex and it required tremendous efforts and resourcefulness. I congratulate you and the new government and hope that you will get on your way.”

The president also noted: “As you mentioned, there are outstanding issues, but those are full of opportunities in the areas of defense, the social welfare and peace making – advancing the peace process. The country needs it and the people need it, the time has come.

“I give you my blessing, and we will gladly follow, after the establishment of the government, the issues you’ve mentioned. Yishar ko’ach, and my blessings are with you and the new government.”

The prime minister replied: “I thank you, and we would like to use your experience and your intelligence.”

Following Lapid-Bennett Deal, Likud Facing Civil War

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

At 12:55 PM Wednesday, the prime minister’s office leaked a message so subversive and so clever, it insisted the editor of the 1 PM news edition at Kol Israel attribute it to anonymous “Likud circles.” That’s one notch below “senior Likud officials” and well below “circles close to the prime minister,” which is, basically, the prime minister. I heard it in my car, driving up to Jerusalem, but didn’t pay attention to the special wording. Maariv’s Shalom Yerushalmi paid attention, and realized the PM people were using the Atomic option.

The Likud circles, according to the leak, threatened that if there won’t be a breakthrough in the coalition negotiations within hours, the Likud would initiate an accelerated negotiations with the Haredi parties for a right-leaning new government without Yair Lapid’s Yesh Atid party.

In addition, a higher level source inside the PM’s circles, told Haaretz that Netanyahu believes the reason Lapid has upped the ante of his demands was his buyer’s remorse. Somehow he ended up agreeing to the Finance portfolio, and now, seeing the mess he would have to deal with, he wants to back out, so he’s making it impossible to come to an agreement.

That’s not such an outlandish surmise. Lapid, ever the glitzy charmer, had had his heart set on the Foreign Minister’s job. And he would have made a great FM, kissing hands and raising champagne glasses and all the other fun stuff FMs get to do in Paris, London, Rome, DC, and, of course, Moscow.

Except Avigdor Liberman, Netanyahu’s faction partner, already had dibs on the Foreign Ministry. Liberman couldn’t serve in the government for now, not until the silly corruption suit against him is resolved in court. But Bibi had promised Ivet to hold on to the seat for him, and breaking that promise would have been a deal killer all around.

So Lapid backed off and agreed to take another of the top three portfolios—Finance.

Customarily, the Foreign, Defense and Finance ministries belong to the party of the Prime Minister. It is a rare occurrence, usually driven by a national crisis (such as when Moshe Dayan was invited, from the opposition benches, to become Defense Minister in 1967). So, giving Lapid this high honor was a big thing.

But the job of Finance Minister is not going to make Lapid many friends this time around. No hand kissing and champagne here for the teen idol. The Netanyahu government has accrued a 40 billion shekel (just under $11 billion) deficit which has to be cut from the next budget. Unlike the U.S. government, which can run deficits in the trillion, Israeli governments are prohibited by law from running a deficit that’s higher than 3 percent of the budget. The new deficit constitutes 5.10 percent, and so some cutting has to take place.

And lover boy Yair Lapid will have the dubious honor of deciding what gets cut:

Should it be the new raises to hospital nurses? Low-cost education? Environmental improvements? Social Security benefit increases for the elderly? Highway construction? Train service?

There’s no two ways about it – in the end, someone is going to hate Yair Lapid for whatever cut he’ll make. And since he’s an avowed free market and anti-tax type, he won’t be able to fix things by taking more money from business (although Teva, one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical conglomerate, received close to a billion dollars in tax break from the outgoing Finance Minister – that should pay for a few hot lunches).

The leak was a lie, of course, Lapid seems just as eager as before to embrace the, arguably, second most important job in government. But the first anonymous threat, about a coalition with Shas, UTJ and Bennett – especially when, reportedly, backed by Bennett himself, who assured Lapid he intended to stay in government, with or without him – that convinced Lapid it was time to call the game and put the cards on the table.

There’s an old Jewish joke about a shadchan who tries to convince a yeshiva bocher to marry Princess Margaret. He answers every one of the poor man’s questions – she would make a great wife, she has money, she will convert for the right man – until the yeshiva bocher breaks down and agrees to the deal. At which point the shadchan sighs deeply and says: Now starts the hard part.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/following-lapid-bennett-deal-likud-facing-civil-war/2013/03/14/

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