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October 2, 2014 / 8 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘language’

In Hebrew: ‘To Bless’

Sunday, May 19th, 2013

לְבָרֵךְ

Filmed Friday, May 17, 2013. Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

In Hebrew: ‘Board’

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

לוּחַ Tradition has it that חַג הַשָּׁבֻעוֹת- the Shavuot festival – marks the anniversary of the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai.

And the Torah – הַתּוֹרָה- was given on tablets – not the kind you swallow (that’s a כַּדּוּר), but the kind made of stone.

The word the תורה uses for tablets is לֻחוֹת, with one tablet being a לוּחַ – a masculine noun, despite its looking feminine in the plural form.

Modern Hebrew takes the word לוח and uses it to mean board, such the one teachers write on.

So we’ve got:

פַּעַם, הַמּוֹרָה הָיְתָה כּוֹתֶבֶת עַל הַלּוּחַ עִם גִּיר. It used to be (literally, once), the (female) teacher would write on the board with chalk. Here are modern varieties of the educational לוח:

לוּחַ מָחִיק erasable board (a whiteboard) לוּחַ חָכָם smartboard לוח has many other meanings, including control panel, calendar and wooden plank. I said that לוח’s meaning in Biblical Hebrew is tablet. The kind of tablet pictured to the left, however is called, in Hebrew, a טַבְּלֶט

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In Hebrew: ‘Pamper’

Monday, May 13th, 2013

לְפַנֵּק In many countries all over the world yesterday it was Mothers Day – יוֹם הָאֵם, in Hebrew.

Here’s a song by Arik Einstein dedicated to his mother. I venture to say it might be sung for most mothers. One of the lines in the song is:

אִמָּא, אִמָּא אַתְּ פִּנַּקְתְּ אֹתִי Mom, mom, you pampered me פינקת comes from the active-intensive פִּעֵל verb, לְפַנֵּק, which also means to indulge someone.

Other forms of this root:

לְהִתְפַּנֵּק- to indulge oneself – a reflexive-intensive הִתְפַּעֵל verb מְפֻנָּק, מְפֻנֶּקֶת- spoiled person, overly-indulged (referring to a male and female, respectively) – an adjective deriving from a passive-intensive פֻּעַל verb. לפנק has its source in Biblical Hebrew.

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In Hebrew: ‘Customer Service’

Sunday, May 12th, 2013

שֵׁרוּת לָקוֹחוֹת Please enjoy the following video on the Hebrew term for “customer service,” filmed on Friday before Shabbat (apologies for the effects of the wind).

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In Hebrew: ‘Connected’

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

מְחֻבָּר, מְחֻבֶּרֶת From the Biblical book of Psalms:

יְרוּשָׁלִַם הַבְּנוּיָה כְּעִיר שֶׁחֻבְּרָה לָהּ יַחְדָּו. Built-up Jerusalem is as a city that was joined together with itself. In case we get lost in the obscurity of that statement, the psalm goes on to explain that Jerusalem is the place of gathering for the diverse tribes of Israel. It is also the home of justice. The psalm then implores the reader to seek out the peace of Jerusalem, for the sake of brotherly love – it seems as if brotherly love depends on peace in Jerusalem (see Hebrew and English here).

The word used to mean it (Jerusalem) was joined is חֻבְּרָה, a passive-intensiveפֻּעַל verb, expressed in the past tense. חוברהalso means it was connected.

To describe someone as connected, you’d use the word מְחֻבָּרin the masculine and מְחֻבֶּרֶתin the feminine.

An example, in the plural:

אֲנַחְנוּ כֻּלָּנוּ מְחֻבָּרִים מִפְּנֵי שֶׁאֲנַחְנוּ כֻּלָּנוּ בְּנֵי אָדָם. We are connected since we’re all human beings. Jerusalem is the city of peace. I venture to say that it’s also the city of חִבּוּר- connection.

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In Hebrew: ‘Rainforest’

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

יַעַר גֶּשֶׁם A rainforest is a place of astounding beauty and biodiversity. Rainforests are also responsible for 28% of the world’s oxygen, according to Wikipedia.

The Hebrew term for rainforest is a literal translation of the English – יַעַר גֶּשֶׁם, where יער means forest and גשם means rain.

An example in context:

“לִפְעָמִים קוֹרְאִים לְיַעֲרוֹת הַגֶּשֵׁם “הָרֵאוֹת שֶׁל הָעוֹלָם
The rainforests are sometimes called “the lungs of the earth.”
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In Hebrew: ‘Air Conditioner’

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

מַזְגָן I stayed once in a Paris hotel for a few days in July. It was sweltering hot, and there was no air conditioner in the room. When I inquired why, the hotel staff told that it only gets that hot a few days in the year, so there’s no real need.

In Israel, air conditioners are already blowing lots of cold air on those escaping from the heat (which I don’t mind so much).

The Hebrew term for air conditioner is מַזְגָן. Its root is מ.ז.ג meaning blending or merging - the air is blended inside the machine and blown out, also blendingconditioning the air in the room. So a מזגן is literally that which blends.

An example:

בְּתֵל אָבִיב, יֵשׁ אֲנָשִׁים שֶׁמְּבַלִּים אֶת כָּל הַקַּיִץ עִם הַמַּזְגָן. In Tel Aviv, there are people who spend the whole summer with the air conditioner. I don’t live in Tel Aviv, but if I did, I wouldn’t be one of those people.

You might also hear Israelis using the term מִזּוּג אֲוִיר. This means, literally,air conditioning, as מיזוגis the noun form of the active-intensive פִּעֵל verb, לְמַזֵּגto blendto merge.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/in-hebrew-air-conditioner/2013/05/07/

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