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October 22, 2016 / 20 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘language’

In Hebrew: ‘Awareness’

Monday, April 29th, 2013


Many would argue that modernity brought with it an increase in self awareness among individuals. Others would say that such awareness has been lessened in our time (maybe we’ll debate it in the advanced conversation group I’m starting to teach tonight in Jerusalem).

In any case, the Hebrew word for awareness is a Modern one –

מוּדָעוּת – though it comes from a verb root introduced in the very first portion of the Torah: י.ד.ע(y.d.a), meaning knowledge.

For example:

בִּישְׂרָאֵל יֵשׁ מוּדָעוּת מֻגְבֶּרֶת לְחֲפָצִים חֲשׁוּדִים.
In Israel there is increased awareness of suspicious objects.

And self awareness is מוּדָעוּת עַצְמִית.

If you wish to say, this person is self-aware or aware of himself, you’d say:

הָאָדָם הַזֶּה מוּדָע לְעַצְמוֹ.

Note that מודעis followed by …לְmeaning to.

Here’s an example in the feminine:

הָאִשָּׁה הַזֹּאת מוּדַעַת לְעַצְמָהּ.
This woman is self-aware.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Replacement’

Sunday, April 28th, 2013

תַּחְלִיף To replace or exchange something is לְהַחְלִיף (leh-hahkh-LEEF) – for instance, when I bought a shirt and a pair of pants at Renuar last week, I asked, ?אֶפְשַׁר לְהַחְלִיף אֹתָם אִם אֲנִי רוֹצֶה (ef-SHAHR leh-hahkh-LEEF oh-TAHM eem ah-NEE roh-TSEH) – might I exchange them if I want?

להחליף is an active-causative הִפְעִיל verb. So it follows that the act of replacing or exchanging isהַחְלָפָה (hahkh-lah-FAH).But a replacement – the item or person in a role that comes in place of something else – is a תַּחְלִיף (tahkh-LEEF).

The teachers at Ulpan La-Inyan מַחְלִיפִים אֶחָד אֶת הַשֵּׁנִי לִפְעָמִיםthey replace one another sometimes (mahkh-lee-FEEM eh-KHAH et hah-sheh-NEE leef-ah-MEEM). And although teachers come and go, and their roles get transferred from one person to the next, בְּאֶמֶת, אֵין לָהֶם תַּחְלִיףreally, there’s no replacement for them (beh-eh-MET EH-een lah-HEM tahkh-LEEF) – since each teacher brings his or her own unique set of gifts and talents to the classroom with which they engage their students.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Abstinence’

Friday, April 26th, 2013


פְּרִישׁוּת is a synonym not featured in the video.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Sea Lion’

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

כֶּלֶב יָם If you’re up for a challenge and you like to read about animals, check out this Ynet article about Israeli wildlife photography. Warning – some pictures are not suitable for vegetarians.

The first animal depicted in the article is a leopard seal, the second-largest seal found around Antarctica.

A seal or sea lion in Hebrew is a כֶּלֶב יָם– literally, a dog of the sea.

A leopard seal is a כֶּלֶב יָם נְמֵרִי – literally, a leopard-like dog of the sea. (A נָמֵרis technically a leopard in Hebrew, but most Israelis use the term to refer to a tiger.)

For example:

בַּשַּׁיִט בְּאַנְטַרְקְטִיקָה הִיא רָאֲתָה כֶּלֶב יָם נְמֵרִי.
On the cruise in Antarctica, she saw a leopard seal.
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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘Addiction’

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013


Before I moved back to Israel in 2007 and opened up Ulpan La-Inyan a year later, I was training as a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. My first post was to Beit T’shuva, a Jewish center for addiction recovery on Venice Blvd.

The Hebrew word for addiction is הִתְמַכְּרוּת, of the root מ.כ.ר (m.k.r) meaning sale – since one sells him/herself, in a way, to the object of addiction.

In context:

בֵּית תְּשׁוּבָה הוּא מֶרְכַּז יְהוּדִי לִגְמִילָה מֵהִתְמַכְּרוּת.
Beit T’shuva (literally, House of Return) is a Jewish center for recovery (literally, weaning) from addiction.

התמכרות comes from the reflexive-intensive הִתְפַעֵל verb,לְהִתְמַכֵּר.

For example:

לֹא קָשֶׁה לְהִתְמַכֵּר לְעִשּׁוּן.
It’s not difficult to become addicted to smoking.

Someone addicted is מָכוּרif a male and מְכוּרָהif a female.

For example:

הִיא מְכוּרָה לְפֵייסְבּוּק.
She is addicted to Facebook.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘To Spend Money’

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

לְהוֹצִיא כֶּסֶף, לְבַזְבֵּז

Term 1: לְהוֹצִיא כֶּסֶף

A while ago I did an entry on expensesהוֹצָאוֹת. To spend money or to create an expense is לְהוֹצִיא כֶּסֶף – literally, to take out money.

For example:

הִיא חוֹשֶׁבֶת פַּעֲמַיִם לִפְנֵי שֶׁהִיא מוֹצִיאָה כֶּסֶף עַל מוֹתָרוֹת.
She thinks twice before spending money on luxuries.

להוציאis an active-causative הִפְעִיל verb.

Don’t confuse this term with the one for to withdraw money from an ATM (automated teller machine) – that’s לִמְשֹוֹךְ כֶּסֶף– literally, to pull money.

למשוךis an active-simple פָּעַל verb.

Term 2: לְבַזְבֵּז

Another way of saying to spend is לְבַזְבֵּז, though people usually use this term to mean to waste.

For example:

בְּנֵי הַנֹּעַר בִּזְבִּזוּ אַלְפֵי שְׁקָלִים שֶׁל הוֹרֵיהֶם בְּמַהֲלַךְ הַקַּיִץ.
The teens spent (wasted) thousands of shekels of their parents’ money over the summer.

לבזבז is an active-intensive פִּעֵל verb.

Likewise, the noun form of לבזבז is בִּזְבּוּז. Thus, a waste of money is בזבוז כסף, a waste of time is בזבוז זְמַן, etc.

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Ami Steinberger

In Hebrew: ‘To Dial’

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

לְחַיֵּג As language develops, words sometimes depart from their original meaning to take on a similar but new meaning.

Take, for example, the English verb to dial meant something else to do with the word day in its original Latin, but today its main meaning is to press numbers on a keypad.

Likewise, the Hebrew word for to dial – לְחַיֵּג (leh-khah-YEG) – comes from the root ח.ו.ג (kh.w.g), which has to do with circles. This root appears in the children’s song, עוּגָה עוּגָה עוּגָה (OO-gah, OO-gah, OO-gah) – Cake, Cake, Cake, in the word נָחוּגָה (nah-KHOO-gah) – we shall go around (see a translation and transliteration as well as a video of the song).

What do circles have to do with dialing? You may recall the ancestor of the iPhone, the rotary phone, which had a round dial.

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Ami Steinberger

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/ktzat-ivrit/in-hebrew-to-dial/2013/04/22/

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