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Posts Tagged ‘light’

Prime Minister’s Health Report

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

As he does every year, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu informs the public on the state of his health.

The Government Press Office reported that the Prime Minister underwent routine annual tests (a physical test and lab tests), and his personal physician, Dr. Zvi Herman Berkowitz, has determined that his medical situation is excellent.

Prime Minister Netanyahu maintains a healthy lifestyle, including a proper diet. His blood pressure is 120/80, assisted by light medication. (This is unchanged from previous years.) He has recovered from a torn tendon in his leg; it has been recommended that he continue physiotherapy and gradually return to exercising in a gym.

Blogger Spotlight: The Happy Healthy Hippie

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

I love meeting fellow food bloggers. Valerie White is the author of The Happy Healthy Hippie and just might convince me to try granola. We all know I have a sweet tooth but after all the carbs and calories I have been consuming over the holidays, I am ready for a healthy fix! Below are just a few of her recipes, all tasty and light. To view more of her recipes, check out thehappyhealthyhippie.com.

Cinnamon Apple French Toast

If you want to have a great start to your Sunday Funday, make sure you eat a healthy and delicious low-calorie breakfast. Believe it or not, this recipe has only 250 calories per serving and is packed with protein, fiber and great taste! This recipe makes two servings.

Ingredients:
1 apple, thinly sliced
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 tbsp. butter
1 egg 1/4 cup almond milk
4 slices of multi-grain bread

Directions:
1. Sauté thinly sliced apple in cinnamon and 1 tbsp butter.
2. Whisk egg, add almond milk.
3. Dip both sides of multi-grain bread.
4. In a large skillet, melt 1 tbsp butter and cook bread on both sides until golden brown.
5. Serve with cinnamon apple mixture on top.

Tabouleh Quinoa Salad

I first had a taste of regular Tabouleh in college when one of my best friends, Linet Keshishian introduced it to me. I was craving it one day and realized it’s super easy to make and it’s super healthy just as I expected. And, because I like to personalize my dishes I used my favorite grains, quinoa to add that grainy texture to it instead of bulgur. This can be eaten as a side salad or as a whole meal as it is packed with protein and other nutrients, filling and light – so, no food coma after.

Ingredients:
2 cups water
1 cup quinoa, rinsed
1 cup tomato, diced
1 cup cucumber, diced
1 cup parsley, chopped
1/4 cup mint, chopped
1/4 cup green onions, chopped
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon cumin, toasted and ground (optional)
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Bring the water and quinoa to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer until the quinoa is tender and the liquid has all been absorbed, about 17-20 minutes and let cool.
2. Mix the quinoa, tomato, cucumber, parsley, mint and green onion.
3. Mix the lemon juice, olive oil, cumin, salt and pepper and toss with salad.

Pears With Yogurt and Granola

Enough said!

Ingredients:
1 pear sliced in half
1/2 cup of non fat yogurt
Granola, blueberry flax seed and a little drizzle of honey.

Directions:
Place pear in bowl or plate. Top with yogurt, granola, blueberry flax seed and honey.

When Nina Safar is not updating recipes on Kosher in the Kitch, she enjoys playing hostess. Never having too much time in the kitchen, she likes recipes that taste great and are easy to make. You don’t have to be a chef to cook a good meal! For more great menu ideas and tasty recipes, check out www.kosherinthekitch.com for your next favorite dish.

The Time For Lighting Candles

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

Shabbat candles must be lit by (and preferably 18 minutes before) sunset. Once it is twilight, the time between sunset and nightfall known as bein hashmashot, it is too late to light. Bein hashmashot begins when the sun sets below the horizon and is no longer visible.

According to Rabbi Yehuda in Tractate Shabbat, bein hashmashot lasts 13 and a half minutes. In Tractate Pesachim, however, the same Rabbi Yehuda maintains that bein hashmashot lasts 72 minutes.

In explaining the discrepancy between the duration of bein hashmashot according to Rabbi Yehuda in Shabbat and Rabbi Yehuda in Pesachim, Rabbeinu Tam explains that there are two separate sunsets: Sunset I, which begins immediately after the sun has sunk below the horizon and lasts 58 and a half minutes, and Sunset II, which starts thereafter when light begins to fade into darkness and lasts an additional 13 and a half minutes until nightfall.

According to Rabbeinu Tam, the period on Friday between Sunset I and Sunset II (58 and a half minutes) is considered weekday, during which time all weekday work may be performed and one may light candles until Sunset II, i.e. 58 and a half minutes after Sunset I.

Many Rishonim, such as the Rambam and the Gaonim, disagree with Rabbeinu Tam. They maintain that for candle lighting there is only one relevant sunset, i.e. Sunset I, when the sun dips below the horizon, and candles must be lit before such time.

Though the Shulchan Aruch agrees with Rabbeinu Tam and maintains that candles can be lit as late as 58 and a half minutes after Sunset I, the Vilna Gaon, following the opinion of the majority of the Rishonim, disagrees with the Schulchan Aruch and maintains that candles must be lit by Sunset I.

There is a third opinion, that of Rabbi Eliezer of Metz, according to which bein hashmashot begins 13 and a half minutes before Sunset I. In his view, candle lighting time would be 13 and a half minutes before Sunset I.

It should be noted that the 13-and-a-half-minute period is derived from the time it takes a person to walk 3/4 of a mile. According to most opinions, it takes a person 18 minutes to walk the distance of one mile (in which case 3/4 of a mile would take 13 and a half minutes) but according to a stricter opinion, it takes a person 24 minutes to walk one mile (in which case 3/4 of a mile would take 18 minutes).

In view of the fact that we are dealing here with the possible violation of a biblical melachah, all modern poskim agree that one must adopt the strictest of all approaches, namely that of Rabbi Eliezer of Metz and that of those who say it takes 24 minutes to walk a mile. Therefore, we light candles 18 minutes before Sunset I. To know when this is, one should consult a local newspaper or a reputable Jewish calendar.

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes that during the 18-minute period between candle lighting and Sunset I, members of the household that are not responsible for lighting the Shabbat candles may continue with weekday work until Sunset I, but that this should not be encouraged.

On the first night of Yom Tov – except for Shavuot – candles may be lit either at the same time as on Erev Shabbat or after returning from Maariv, provided one lights from an existing light. On the second night of Yom Tov, however, as well as whenever Shabbat precedes Yom Tov and on both days of Shavuot, candles should be lit from an existing light, after nightfall.

Raphael Grunfeld’s book, “Ner Eyal on Seder Moed” (distributed by Mesorah) is available at OU.org and your local Jewish bookstore.  He can be contacted at rafegrunfeld@gmail.com.

Terror Attack in Beitar

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

A 17 year old Arab attacked and stabbed a 30 year old Jewish bus driver at the entrance to the town of Beitar Illit. The driver, a resident of Gush Etzion had just finished his shift, and was taking a walk.

The driver was treated by MDA and taken to the hospital with light stab wounds in his neck/shoulder. His condition is listed as stable.

The Arab terrorist was captured at the scene.

Beiter Illit is a mostly Ultra-Orthodox town.

TORAH, TORAH, TORAH

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

As we saw in a previous blog, the t’shuva of the Nation and the Land of Israel go hand in hand. Phase two is the Nation’s return to the Torah.

During the reign of King Solomon, the Nation of Israel was at its prime. We lived in peace in our own homeland. A Jewish government ruled over the country from the majestic city of Jerusalem. All of the people gathered for the Festivals at the Temple three times a year. Jewish law went forth from the Sanhedrin. Prophets communicated the word of the Lord to the Nation and the world. A powerful Jewish army guarded the country’s borders. Torah was studied in great academies of learning. Hebrew was spoken on the street. The leaders of foreign nations flocked to Jerusalem to pay tribute to the Jews.

When Israel was exiled, however, everything was lost. The country was conquered by enemies. Jerusalem was razed, the Temple destroyed. Prophecy ceased. Jews wandered from country to country. They began speaking strange languages. Instead of being honored by the gentiles, the Jews were disgraced. They became an oppressed minority in alien lands. And while Jews continued to learn Torah throughout their exile, its light was considerably waned (Chagiga 4B). In the face of persecution and assimilation, Judaism lost its once great stature.

As we mentioned in our previous blog, with the commencement of the Zionist movement, the Jewish people began to return to what had been lost. Jews began to return to their homeland. They began to return to their very own Hebrew language. A Jewish government returned to Jerusalem. The city was rebuilt. Once again, Jews were sovereign in their homeland. Jewish soldiers once again guarded its borders. Once again, foreign rulers came to pay tribute to the leaders of Israel. Out from the humiliation of exile, the Nation was resurrected to life. The physical, national body of Israel’s statehood was restored with a newfound Jewish valor and strength. But without the Temple, without the Sanhedrin and prophecy, without the pilgrimages to Jerusalem three times a year, and without a national dedication to Torah, the return is still incomplete. Nonetheless, Rabbi Kook assures us, within the yearning to return to the Land is a deeper, hidden yearning to return to the Torah as well.

Within the inner heart, in its pure and holy chambers, the Israeli flame increases, demanding the strong, brave, constant connection of life to all of the mitzvot of God…. And in the hearts of all the empty ones, and in the hearts of all of the sinners of Israel, the fire burns and blazes in the most inward depths, and in the Nation in its entirety, all of the desire for freedom, and all of the yearning for life, for the community and for the individual, all of the hope for Redemption, only from the source of this inner spring of life do they flow in order to live Israeli life in its fullest, without contradiction or limitation (Orot, Eretz Yisrael, 8).

Under the secular-looking Zionist State is a flaming, raging, engulfing fireball of t’shuva. The Jewish soul is yearning for religion. Like a man dying of thirst in the desert, the voice of the Nation cries out, “Torah, Torah, Torah.” Ironically, it is precisely the spiritual wilderness which brings the great thirst. Rabbi Kook writes:

T’shuva will come (to the Jewish Nation) in several directions. One of the causes will be the deep sorrow felt over the humiliation inflicted upon the great spiritual treasure which our forefathers bequeathed to us, and which possesses immeasurable power and glory (Orot HaT’shuva, 4:9).

Israel’s great spiritual treasure is the Torah, the commandments, the holidays, Jewish customs, traditions, prayer, and the vast sea of Talmudic learning.

This mighty spirit spans over all generations. Its source is the most exalted Divine Source of life. When one looks to it, one finds everything, all beauty and splendor (Ibid).

Rebbe Nachman of Breslov told a story about a poor man from a poor village who was told in a dream to seek out a treasure buried under a certain bridge in a faraway town. The poor man made the long journey and located the bridge. As he was searching around, a policeman accosted him and demanded to know what he was doing. When the poor man explained, the policeman confided that he too had had a similar foolish dream, in which a treasure was to be found in a certain faraway village under the shack of a poor man. When the policeman cited the poor man’s name and village, the poor man realized that the treasure was buried under his very own house! He had to make the long journey to the bridge to discover the secret. Sure enough, when the poor man hurried back home, he uncovered the treasure under the floor of his storeroom.

Zionism is T’shuva Too!

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Rabbi Kook teaches that even in the return of the non- religious Zionists to Israel there is a profound holy core. The inner source of their desire to return is the Divine Ideal itself – the return to the Jews to the Land of Israel, as the Torah and the Prophets of Israel both promise. With time, the holy spark in the Zionist movement will surely be ignited into a towering flame. This great transformation may take one hundred years or more. We need to remember that after nearly two-thousand years in exile, a few generations is like the blink of an eye.

The important thing to know is that the t’shuva of the entire Nation is destined to come. Rabbi Kook writes:

The awakened yearning of the Jewish people as a whole to return to their Land, to their roots, to their spirit and way of life — truthfully, there is the light of t’shuva in this (Orot HaT’shuva, 17:2).

The Book of Ezekiel includes an overview of Jewish history which traces Israel’s exile among the gentile nations, and her ultimate return to the Land of Israel and Torah. Only after the nation’s physical revival in Israel do the Jewish people undergo the period of spiritual cleansing which leads them back to Torah, as it says:

For I will take you from among the nations, and gather you out of all countries, and I will bring you into your own Land. Then I will sprinkle pure water upon you, and you shall be clean; from all of your uncleanlinesses, and from all of your idols, will I cleanse you. A new heart will I also give you, and a new spirit will I put within you; and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you a heart of flesh. And I will put My spirit in you, and cause you to follow My statutes, and you shall keep My judgments and do them. And you shall dwell in the Land that I gave to your fathers; and you shall be My people, and I shall be your God (Ezekiel, 36:24-28).

The return to our true national identity, and the spiritual revolution which follows, encompasses all aspects of Jewish life. This great return, while still in its nascent stages, is something we have witnessed in our century. First, out of the graveyards of exile, came a new hope and zest for life, as if our scattered, dry bones were rising to rebirth. Out of the ashes of the Holocaust, the Jewish Nation was reborn in Israel. The Hebrew language was restored. After two-thousand years of wandering, the Jews returned to being an independent Nation in their own Land. An incredible, new awakening of Jewish valor and physical prowess, epitomized by the Israel Defense Forces, startled the world. The ingathering of exiles from the four corners of the earth led to the building of a dynamic, progressive society. Yeshivas were opened all over the country. Today, Israel is unquestionably the Torah center of the world. All of these things are aspects of t’shuva, of a Nation returning to its roots.

As Rabbi Kook writes:

Without question, the light of Mashiach and the salvation of Israel, the rebirth of the Nation and the Land, the revival of its language and literature — all stem from the source of t’shuva, and out of the depths to the heights of the highest t’shuva, everything will be brought (Orot HaT’shuva, 4:11).

The return of a scattered people to its Land is no simple matter. Because of the magnitude of the undertaking, there are numerous problems. Nonetheless, Rabbi Kook assures us that our inner longing for God will overcome all of the barriers. Even the brazen secularism, which seems so contrary to the Nation’s holiest goals, will become a powerful vessel bursting with Torah. He writes:

Out of the profane, holiness will also come forth, and out of wanton freedom, the beloved yoke (of Torah) will blossom. Golden chains will be woven and arise out of secular poetry, and a brilliant light of t’shuva will shine from secular literature. This will be the supreme wonder of the vision of Redemption. Let the bud sprout, let the flower blossom, let the fruit ripen, and the whole world will know that the Spirit of God is speaking within the Nation of Israel in its every expression. All of this will climax in a t’shuva which will bring healing and Redemption to the world (Ibid, 17:3).

Dealing With Leftovers

Friday, September 28th, 2012

The holidays are upon us which means lots of food. So, what to do with all those leftovers? Here are some creative ideas.

Potato Kugel

* Cut into individual size portions, remove the crust and fry on all sides. Serve piping hot.

* Freeze some and use in the cholent next week. They will love it.

* If you only have a small amount left over, crumble it up and add to a vegetable soup.

 

Broccoli or Spinach Kugels

* Mash up, add an egg or two and a tablespoon of flour. Place a nice amount on a piece of pizza dough and fold over like a calzone. Brush with egg wash and bake for an hour on 300° or until light brown.

* To make individual portions, use the small square frozen dough. Brush with egg wash and sprinkle on sesame seeds. Then bake until light brown.

* Cut into small cubes and mix with cooked rice or potato. Serve hot.

* As with the potato kugel, crumble a small amount into vegetable soup.

 

Any Cooked Vegetable

* If you have left over green beans, carrots, eggplant, or even potatos, mix together with one egg, a tablespoon of flour for every cupful (about), salt, pepper and garlic powder. Fill a baking dish up to 2/3 full. Sprinkle breadcrumbs on top and bake at 350° for one hour.

 

Cakes

* Cut sponge or chocolate cake into thin slices arrange the slices flat one layer at a time on a cookie sheet and bake in the oven for fifteen minutes on 300°. Serve as cookies.

* Crumble cake, add a little liquor to the crumbs, add a stick of margarine, and any leftover cream or frosting. Mix well. Form balls and roll them in sprinkles or coconut.

* If you have cake made out of dough like a cocosh, run it in the food processor and then sprinkle over ice cream or fruits. Or use in place of crumbs at the bottom of pies.

 

Liquids

* Never throw away liquids! When you cook green beans or corn use the liquids strained in another dish you cook. Yesterday I cooked chicken soup in one pot and corn in another. When the corn was cooked I strained the liquid and added to the chicken soup. You can do it with any liquid. That delicious full of flavor of liquid from baking chicken or meat should never be discarded. I put it in a jar overnight in the refrigerator, then remove the fat that forms on top and add it to cooked vegetables, to the cholent or to enhance any cooked soup.

* At the end of the summer we are left over with many sauces in the refrigerator from barbeques. Don’t throw them away. Use them up slowly; a tablespoon in the cholent, in vegetable dishes or the next roast you bake. The idea is not to throw away good food that you paid for it dearly.

 

Fruits

* If you have fruits starting to turn, use them quickly.

* Make a smoothie with the fruit, some milk or water and some kind of sweetener. Cook them in a small amount of water with a little sugar and serve as compote. This freezes very well.

* Arrange them in a piecrust and bake for an hour on 350°.

* Apples cab be cooked in a small amount of water and then strained for applesauce; use the liquid as juice. In my house my grandchildren know that Savta even makes apple juice for them.

Moadim L’simcha – and let me know how you best used your leftovers.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/uncategorized/dealing-with-leftovers/2012/09/28/

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