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August 27, 2014 / 1 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Likud Beitenu’

Israel Voted Today: I Chose ‘Power for Israel’

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Israelis went to vote today in the truest democratic sense of the word. We chose  from no less than 32 political parties (I think I even heard 34). You can’t say we aren’t diverse. We have several religious parties, several secular and even anti-religious parties. We have several Arab parties, nationalist parties – left wing and right wing. We have a party promoting the legalization of marijuana and parties that focus on social issues.

Someone asked me if Israelis were forced to vote or they had a choice…we so have a choice and we choose to vote. Pick your issue – and there is a party for you. Our government is formed by the party with the most votes – its leader will be our next prime minister. Of course. that isn’t a given. The President – mostly a figurehead, has the power to choose another party with less votes if he thinks they have a better chance of getting a majority of the other parties to agree.

This time, it is almost a foregone conclusion that Bibi Netanyahu will win big enough to remain in office. But it is also assumed he doesn’t have a chance of winning big enough not to have to deal with smaller parties. Some of the smallest parties may not cross the minimum two percent (two plus seats) threshold. It’s exciting; it’s fun – it’s Israel at its best. Today, people are urging each other to vote – no matter who – make your voice known.

I debated who to vote for – which party to support. Ideologically, I’m limited to about 2.5 parties. I came to Israel with the firm belief that Likud was Israel’s best choice. As soon as I moved to Israel, finally having the right to vote here – I joined the Likud party. Although technically, I left them a few years ago, they had long since abandoned their own mandate and beliefs. It is with great relief that I never even bothered thinking, never mind regretting, that I would not vote for Likud this time around.

Yesh Atid, run by Yair Lapid, is a party that I detest. I am smart enough to know that the anger I feel towards them is present at a level higher than they deserve. I was urged to listen to Yair Lapid speaking before an audience of Ultra-Orthodox Jews in Kiryat Ono. I found him insulting, patronizing and obnoxious. Oh, sure – he’s handsome and charismatic – but he is so filled with himself, it’s hard to see that Israel will ever have a greater place in his mind than his own opinions. No vote for Yesh Atid.

Shas is one of the Ultra-Orthodox parties that Yair Lapid detests – and his endless attacks added to the dirt of this election. Sadly, he isn’t completely wrong. Shas has engaged, once again, in a disgusting campaign of negativity. Their spiritual leader, a great rabbi whose words are often taken out of context…often speaks words that shouldn’t be said. Shas does some amazing things at the community level – if only they would spend more time promoting the good things they do rather than attacking others.

If I ever considered voting for them – which to be honest, I never have – two remarks would have cost them my vote this time around. The first was when Rav Ovadia Yosef said that if there is a forced draft – he would tell his followers to send their children out of Israel. This concept of not serving while benefiting from the state bothers me no end. His second comment was that those who support Bayit HaYehudi are not Jews. I don’t need Rav Yosef telling me who is a Jew but I’ve wasted enough time on a party known for its corruption and rationalizing political positions based on the money for which it can sell its support. No vote for Shas…

HaTnua (the Movement), Labor, Meretz, Kadima – I’ll throw them all together and I’ll throw them all out easily. They are, for the most part, ignorant or ridiculously naive when it comes to Israel’s position in the Middle East. They demand social justice but have no real platform and more – when they had power, the situation wasn’t any better so they have no right to claim they know how to improve the situation. As for security and Shaul Mofaz of Kadima, a former Chief of Staff of the army – I can only assume delusional is a better word for the weakness he would have us show to our enemies. Or, perhaps like the others, interest in his own sense of importance makes him willing to risk Israel’s future for political gain? Whatever the truth – no vote for these parties.

My Last Word on Election Day

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

I am a member of the Likud, a member of it’s Central Committee and a candidate on it’s list (albiet so low that no matter how well the Likud does I wouldn’t be in the Knesset). There’s a lot I could say in favor of the Likud and why one should vote for it today.

Last night, the JewishPress.com published a great article making many of these points by Dovid Schwartz, who lives in the settlement of Karnei Shomron and is chairman of the Likud branch council there. One of his finest arguments was that all things considered, Netanyahu has been a pretty good prime minster, even for the settlements.

The only thing I would add on that point is that people should look at things in the wider perspective. today at the voting booth I got into an argument with someone (who said they were voting for Power for Israel) who said the Likud throws people out of their homes, won’t allow people to move into legally purchased homes, etc. My response was – do you know what didn’t happen during the last four years? A Convergence Plan. An Annapolis conference. The current Prime Minister did not encourage the U.S. President to put all effort into the Israeli-Palestinian peace process as Ehud Olmert told George W. Bush behind closed doors.

The big surprise of the election season is, of course, Naftali Bennett and the Jewish Home party which, according to polls, will garner way more than the less than 10 seats that was initially predicted for it. Part of that is due to the fact that there are simply voters who can’t vote Likud and want to vote for some party to the right of the Likud. Once Yisrael Beitenu and the Likud merged, their votes were put in play.

Those who vote like this – in order to hurt the Likud or to “strengthening it from the right” as they would say are only harming themselves. It’s true if the Likud is weaker, Bennett will have more power in the coalition. But the same will also be true for Yesh Atid (Lapid) or whatever other leftist party is brought in to make the coalition stable (that is to bring it up to 70 Members of Knesset). If the Likud only gets an amount of seats in the low thirties, whichever leftist party it is that joins the government will have a tremendous amount of bargaining power. So will Shas and Torah Judaism. That power will determining government policies, what laws are passed, and which party gets what ministries and who will be defense minister. For instance, a leftist party will object strongly to Moshe Ya’alon as defense minister. How much leverage they have will determine whether their objection is accepted.

Weakening the Likud for nationalist reasons will also contribute to keeping out nationalist Likud members like Ayoob Kara and Keti Shitreet, numbers 38-39 on the Likud’s list, out of the Knesset. Outside of the Knesset they would become much less relevant in the future direction of the party as well.

So my advice is, don’t try to outsmart anyone. You will just be shooting yourself in the foot. Vote for the party you want to see lead the country.

Vote Likud and Give Netanyahu Hell

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

If you want to make it impossible for Bibi to do anything stupid like dismantling outposts and robbing Jews of their land, then the best way to stop him is to vote Likud. The bigger it is, the less he can control it.

If you vote Bennett, Likud will be smaller, he will have less internal Likud opposition, and Bibi will use Bennett like a spare tire. Bennett will join the coalition when Bibi needs him, and when Bibi wants to do something stupid like “peace negotiations” or “gestures to the Palestinians,” he’ll kick out Bennett and bring in Yesh Lapid or Karl “Yachimovich” Marx and do it anyway.

The bigger Likud is, the more people in the coalition that cannot be kicked out at Bibi’s convenience. When Bibi wants to do something stupid, I’d rather he have 40 Likud MK’s to fight with that he can’t kick out rather than 30.

Bibi wants the smallest Likud possible while still maintaining his PM seat. That’s why he kicked down Moshe Feiglin last time, and that’s why he launched a suicidal inane distasteful campaign against Bayit Yehudi this time. To get the right wingers disgusted with him so they’ll  vote for an outside party that he can control with ease.

So help us stop Bibi. Vote Likud. Make it so huge it’s unmanageable. Give Bibi hell.

And if you really hate Likud and can’t bring yourself to do it, which is understandable, vote Aleh Yarok.

Visit Settlers of Samaria.

Why I am Voting Likud

Monday, January 21st, 2013

For starters, I have a confession to make. For me, the decision tomorrow is not between Likud and the Jewish Home, but rather between Likud and Michael Ben-Ari, who is leading the Power for Israel slate. I have nothing but respect for MK Ben-Ari and were I to vote based on my heart – it would be for him. He has spent all his time the past four years fighting for us in the Knesset, on remote hilltops and in south Tel Aviv (against the influx of illegal aliens). He is a genuine lover of Israel and a proud Jew, and again, were I voting based on my heart, I would not care what the polls were showing regarding his chances of getting in – and would proudly vote for him.

Unfortunately (or fortunately), when voting I follow my head as emotions have this nasty habit of getting in the way of good decisions. As such, I will devote the rest of this rant to why, in my humble opinion, the Likud is a better choice than Bayit Yehudi.

I returned to Israel in 1999 after many years in the U.S. and I can still remember how one of the things that bothered me most in the U.S. was the lack of “togetherness.” With all the challenges we face here in Israel, in the U.S. things were worse. Each American Jewish community was an island unto its own and if not for the common interest known as the state of Israel, each community would have very little to do with other communities – similar or not. I was more part of a community than part of a nation and I yearned for more.

Not long after moving to the settlement of Karnei Shomron my convictions were put to the test as I was not overly pleased with the local education system and my first instinct (as an American) was to start a new school. I mean – isn’t the best way to improve something to foster competition? I started discussing with some friends and just as the idea started to gain some momentum, it dawned on me that it was this exact behavior I resented in the U.S. and here I was guilty of doing the same. If in this tiny settlement our kids couldn’t all learn together under one roof, how could we expect to live as one with the rest of our nation 20 kilometers due west? I thought: “Wouldn’t it be better to try and improve the existing system rather than replace it”? So instead, I focused my energies on working within the system and became the head of the Parent Teachers Association for 10 years spending countless hours of my own time on this and thank God with great success.

The same logic holds true for the Likud. When searching for a political home, I was looking for a party that was the closest to my ideology, while at the same time representative to the best extent possible of the various segments of our wonderful nation: Sfardim and Ashkenazim, Tzabbarim and Olim (not just American), Newer-Settlers (e.g., Yesha) and Older-Settlers (e.g., Tel-aviv and Petach Tikva), Men and women, Doctors, Professors and taxi drivers, Jews and non-Jews that are true supporters of Israel – like the Druze (MK Ayoub kara from the Likud is a stronger supporter of the Land of Israel than many of our “own”), and so forth and so forth.

The Likud was the only party that even came close as its charter was actually quite good and its human capital matched the list described above. With that in mind, I joined as a rank and file member (around the year 2000) and have since taken part in many important internal votes including the one against the 2005 Disengagement (the one Sharon chose to ignore, though it was still important that we won), while most of my friends simply watched from the sidelines.

Now don’t get me wrong, the Likud I joined was far from ideal – but here too, my thought was “let’s fix from within and not try and replace with something new and sectorial,” and fix we did. With tremendous efforts from thousands of people just like you and me who are loyal to our land, we made a change. It wasn’t easy and it took a long time – but if the current Likud list is any indication we are succeeding beyond our wildest dream. The only way to explain how the superb list of Likud Knesset candidates we currently have, ranked as high as they did, in many cases ousting Likud “legends” the likes of Meridor and Begin – is to understand that the “Amcha” or everyday Likud members on the other side of the green line became convinced that we (“the settlers”) are interested in a real partnership and decided to give “our guys” a chance. Let’s face it – there are simply not enough Likud members in Judea and Samaria to have achieved these results on our own. To not vote Likud now would not only run counter to my convictions, but would be interpreted by these same very same party members and partners as dubious and dishonest, ruining in the long run all we have managed to achieve.

My Vote Won’t Help Sell Out the Land of Israel

Sunday, January 20th, 2013

A reader asked me who I am voting for and why.

Once upon a time, there was a group of people who wanted to rob a bank, but they needed a van and driver. They approached a man with a van, and invited him to join them, offering to reward him lucratively for his services. He told them that he was against robbing banks and he couldn’t accept stolen money. So they promised to pay him up front, not with money stolen from the bank. When he agreed, the group finished all their plans for the robbery, paying the driver up front. When the time came, the driver drove them to the bank and dropped them off at the corner. Seeing a policeman walking down the street, the driver quickly sped off, wanting nothing to do with the robbery, just as he told the group at the beginning. Eventually, all the thieves were arrested, along with the driver, who insisted he hadn’t participated in the robbery at all. “I’m innocent. I’m innocent,” he protested, but the judge found him guilty along with the others.

I am voting for “Otzma L’Yisrael” because I don’t want to be part of a robbery. What robbery? It is no secret that the Likud and Yisrael Betanu are in favor of the Two-State Solution, which would steal a giant chunk of Israel from the Jews and give it to the Arabs. The Two-State Solution is a part of their platform. So I can’t vote for them.

The Jewish Home party, “HaBayit HaYehudi,” has announced that they want to be a part of the coalition in the next government that Bibi will form. Even though they are against the Two-State Solution, they want to “influence from within.” They will probably stipulate in the coalition agreement that if the government enters into negotiations with the Arabs and decides to actualize the Two-State Solution plan, the Jewish Home party will be free to leave the coalition before the treaty is signed, just like the driver who took off before the robbery took place. In the meantime, for helping the coalition get to the signing ceremony, the Jewish Home will receive ample reward in the form of government positions, and money for worthwhile projects. But when it comes time for the photos of Bibi shaking hands with Mohammed, the members of the Jewish Home party will all hold up their hands and say, “Our hands are clean. We were against the robbery from the beginning!”

This scenario has happened before. The Mafdal party, the forerunner of the Jewish Home, was a member of the Sharon government leading up to the Disengagement from Gush Katif. They held the coalition in place while Sharon craftily arranged the robbery, then pulled out of the government when the end was already a fait accompli. Bibi did the very same thing, voting against the Disengagement on the final day, when the battle was already lost, after having helped the government get there, so he could hold up his hands and say, “I had nothing to do with the robbery.”

I don’t want to help anyone rob banks, and I certainly I don’t want to help anyone sell the Land of Israel down the drain. So I can’t vote for the Likud, and I can’t vote for the good people in the Jewish Home party, even though they are against giving Israel away to the Arabs, and even though they intend to pull out of Bibi’s government just before the robbery, because by sitting in such a government, they will be accomplices to the theft. And even if such a treaty is never signed, I still can’t vote for a party which will be a part of a government that advocates giving away the Land of God for “peace,” because, as Rabbi Tzvi Yehuda Kook taught his students, even talking about surrendering the Land of Israel is as forbidden as eating pork.

So I’m voting for Power for Israel – “Otzma L’Yisrael,” because they don’t want to sit in a government that has given a phony Kashrut certificate to Two-State Solutions that steal from the Jewish People, violate the Torah, and make a mockery of the word of God.

Settler ‘Founding Fathers’ Supports Likud Beytenu (Video)

Sunday, January 20th, 2013

As Israel enters the final days before the elections on Tuesday, several leading officials in Likud-Beytenu have voiced concern over the split in votes on the Right between Likud-Beytenu and the Bayit Yehudi’s party.  Last week, Likud MK Ze’ev Elkin said, “If we don’t reach around 40 seats and there’s no big gap between us and the left, the President is likely to choose Yechimovich.”

Indeed there is historical precedent for such concerns. In 1999 and 1992, the Right lost out to the left-wing governments of Barak and Rabin respectively.  They lost because the Right was splintered by parties who detracted from the Likud.

The results were the Oslo and Camp David accords in which Israel offered everything for peace and in return, on both occasions, was rewarded with waves of Palestinian terrorism and the murder of innocent Israelis.

Adding their voices to this concern are two of the key heads of the Settler movement.  Zvi Hendel in fact, one of the founders of the Gush Katif, and evacuated from his home during the Disengagement has said that the only way to secure the Land of Israel is with a strong Likud-Beytenu.

Moreover, Danny Dayan, the outgoing head of the Yesha Council has said that he was a key engineer of the efforts which brought down Shamir’s government in 1992.  He says in a video posted online that this led to the Left taking power.

Channel 10 Poll: Likud-Beitenu Down to 32; Jewish Home 14; Power for Israel 2

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

While most polls in the last week have shown the Likud-Beitenu stabilizing at 34 mandates, a poll published tonight (Wednesday) by Channel 10 shows the Likud-Beitenu garnering only 32 mandates.

The Channel 10 report included the fact that none of the Likud’s district candidates would get in and even MK Carmel Shama could be on the chopping bloc. Not mentioned is the fact that current MK Ayoub Kara (number 39 on the joint list, but the 25th ranking Likud candidate) would also not get in the Knesset.

Also, apparently Gideon Sa’ar who chairs the campaign department (mateh behirot) and Gilad Erdan who chairs the public relations department (mateh hasbarah) are not even speaking.

As for the other parties, the poll shows the right-wing-religious bloc garnering 65 mandates. That includes Power for Israel which would pass the voting threshold and garner two mandates, but would not likely join nor be included in a coalition headed by Netanyahu.

The Jewish Home party would garner 14 seats, keeping with the 13-14 shown by other polls over the past week.

Shas would garner 11 mandates, and Torah Judaism six. Am Shalem would only garner one, not passing the voting threshold.

On the Left, Labor would only garner 16, Yesh Atid 11, the Movement nine, Meretz six. The three Arab parties would receive a total of 11 mandates. Kadima would pass the voting threshold with two mandates. The Green Leaf party and the New Country parties each would only receive one mandate and would fail to pass the voting threshold by only tens of thousands of votes each.

The poll was conducted by the Dahaf Institute. Seven-hundred and sixty five people were interviewed by phone, including cell phone. (Many Israeli polling firms interview only 500 potential voters).

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/hadar/channel-10-poll-likud-beitenu-down-to-32-jewish-home-14-power-to-israel/2013/01/16/

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