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August 30, 2016 / 26 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘list’

Jewish Home Primaries Today, Vote for the Anglo

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Today, the Jewish Home party (formerly known as the National Religious Party) is holding primaries for its list of candidates for the Knesset. It’s not clear how many seats the party will get in the next Knesset.

Its Knesset list will be merged with the National Union, reportedly at a 1:1 ratio. The total number of seats will likely be higher than the two party’s have today in the Knesset, which is seven.

Some polls even show the joint list receiving up to 13 seats. I would guess that those who want to vote to the right of the Likud now no longer have the option to vote for Yisrael Beteinu since those two parties will have a joint list, and they will be forced to vote for the Jewish Home.

The election of a new head of the party – Naftali Bennett- who is well known and who is interested in reaching out beyond the parties traditional base of support, will also give the party a boost.

But this is Israel and anything can happen between today and January 22nd – the date of the general elections.  For those candidate’s running for a spot on the party’s slate, they can’t rely on the party getting 13, 10 or even 8 spots. They need to get as a high as possible on the list.

As the Jewish Home has a total membership of around 54,000 every vote will count in that tight race.

One of the candidates is Jeremy Gimpel, who originates from the U.S.

I have to admit, I wasn’t very pleased at first with the announcement of Gimpel and his talk/radio show partner Ari Abramowitz that they were running for the Knesset.

It was clear to me that even if the party would net five seats either on its own or as part of a joint list with the National Union – two more than it has today – it would be very unlikely that two of the five would go to two English-speakers hitherto unknown in Israeli politics.

I am also very active in the Likud, where members will be voting in a primary race for a party that has 27 seats and is and will be leading the country. I didn’t like the idea of people joining a party to vote for one person when they could be joining a party and have influence over approximately 27 Members of Knesset.

I also see the Jewish Home as a sectarian party. It has its public – the national religious community – and it cares about that sector’s interests.  As a Zionist, and even as a religious Zionist, I believe it is irresponsible for a politician or a party, to behave this way. Laws, the budget, policies: these must be drafted in consideration of the national interest. I understand that the Israeli electoral system promotes this behavior, but it should be resisted.

Perhaps Naftali Bennett, who was only elected party chairman on November 6th, will indeed broaden the party’s scope. But that is yet to be seen.

Nevertheless, Gimpel (and Abramowitz) saw an opening in the generally closed-to-newcomers Israeli political scene. The Jewish Home would be holding primaries for the first time. It did not have a membership base. All candidates running for a spot would be starting from scratch. Whoever they registered by the deadline would become the voters in the upcoming primary.

In the Likud, by contrast, there are 123,000 members, which is a relatively small number, but there is a 16-month waiting period before members can vote. Primaries are held at least 6 months before the scheduled date of the general election. So any Knesset campaign would need to already have registered a bloc of members at least 22 months in advance of the general election date. Practically, it would have to be even earlier since the general elections are almost always held earlier than scheduled.

This election cycle they will be held in January 2013, nine months earlier than scheduled. The primaries in the Likud will be held on November 25th. To be eligible to vote in the primary, one must have registered by July 25th, 2011, more than two years ahead of the scheduled date of the general election.

Daniel Tauber

Updated: Sunday’s List of Rocket Launches, Strikes, Injuries, and Damage

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

We’ve decided to open up a new list of rocket launches/strikes for Sunday. For all the previous launches up to Sunday morning  go here.

Watch a video of a Red Alert in Sderot.

11:18 PM Sdot HaNegev, Shaar HaNegev

9:11 PM Netovot, Rahat, Bnei Shimon, Sdot Negev

8:1 5 PM Eshkol

8:00 PM Sderot

7:58 PM Sderot

7:46 PM Eshkol

7:30 PM Eshkol

7:07 PM Eshkol

6:46 PM Kissufim

6:38 PM Eshkol

6:19 PM Eshkol

6:02 PM Eshkol

5:00 PM Shaar HaNegev

4:56PM Sderot

3:57 PM Ashkelon, Lachish, Shaa HaNegev

1:57 PM Be’er Sheva

1:04PM Ashkelon Beach

12:56 PM Sdot HaNegev

12:35 PM Ashkelon

12:31 PM Eshkol

12:31  PM Ashkelon Beach

12:29 PM Golan Heights (yeah, you read that right)

12:05 PM Shaar HaNegev

11:54 AM Shaar HaNegev. Sdot HaNegev, Eshkol

10:48 AM Double Header (again) – Sderot and Shaar HaNegev

10:17 AM Factory in Sderot suffers direct hit. No injuries.

10:09 AM Double Header – Sderot and Shaar HaNegev

9:50 AM Shaar HaNegev (4 rockets)

Jewish Press News Briefs

Rockets Injure 3 in Sderot

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Radio Darom (South) reports that 3 people in Sderot were injured from shrapnel from a rocket launch. The injuries are listed as light to moderate.

A 4th person has been injured, but no details are available yet.

At least 10 rockets were launched at Sderot between 7:55 AM and 8:15 AM on Sunday morning.

Click here for the longer list of rocket launches from Gaza.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Three Things to Do Before Meeting Your Financial Planner

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Did you know that the most important part of a financial planning meeting occurs even before you set foot inside your financial adviser’s office?

Before you meet for the first time, you need to do your homework. Even the most professional adviser can’t help you if you haven’t done these three things:

1. Make a list of your current income and expenses, as well as future anticipated income and expenses. Then, create a careful inventory of your net assets. Include any property you own, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, savings and pension plans. To make this easier, use these trackers to organize your information.

2. Outline your goals.  Take a realistic look at what you want to accomplish beyond paying your monthly bills.  Do you have large college tuition expenses or wedding bills looming in the future?

When do you wish to retire? All of the various factors that may affect your future goals and desires should be written down before you meet with your financial planner so they can be included in the plan.

3. Buy a box of tissues either for the disappointing news that your aspirations are beyond your means or for the tears of joy when you find that your dreams are within your reach. While meeting with a financial planner can help create order an increased chances of reaching your goals, it shouldn’t bring any surprises.

The more complete your list of net assets, the more thoughtful your goals, and the more realistic your expectations are, the greater the chances of your reaching them… and the better you’ll sleep.

If you’re like me, even the most comfortable eye shades won’t help you fall asleep unless your finances are in order. A financial planner can’t make miracles or predict the future. However, if the clients supply accurate information and realistic goals, together they can create a financial plan to maximize chances of reaching your life goals.

Doug Goldstein, CFP®

Naftali Bennett Wins Bayit Yehudi Vote, Orlev Quits Politics

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Businessman and former Sayeret Matkal (Special Forces) officer Naftali Bennett parachuted his way into the top position of the Bayit Yehudi (“Jewish Home”) party on Tuesday, at the first of two Primary votes. The second vote will be for the party list.

The next challenge that Bennett has in front of him will be to integrate all of the Ichud Leumi party members into the party, so that they will run as one large list.

The Bayit Yehudi party represents the Religious-Zionist sector.

3:46 AM  (Wednesday – Israel Time) Naftali Bennett is the winner of the Bayit Yehudi primaries, with 67% of the vote, and Orlev with 32%. A small number of votes are left to be counted on Wednesday. Final results will be officially announced by the party at 10:00 AM.

12:03 AM (Wednesday) Zevulun Orlev has announced his retirement from politics. Bennett is the new head of the Bayit Yehudi party.

11:35 PM With 40% of the votes counted, Bennet has 9429 votes, and Orlev has 3829 votes.

The ballot count is currently in progress in the primary race between Naftali Bennett and Zevulun Orlev for the head of the Bayit Yehudi party.

The count so far indicates that Bennett  is leading with some 70% of the votes.

There are reports that Bennett plans to announce his victory at midnight.

 

Jewish Press News Briefs

Reality Threat

Monday, November 5th, 2012

The following is a partial list of things I always knew I would never be good at:

1) Math 2) Creative writing 3) Jewish outreach 4) Playing with children

How did I come up with this list? Simple. Math was never my favorite subject in school and I always had to work hard to earn decent grades on math tests; creative writing may have been up my alley in elementary and high school, but over the past few years I have concluded that my thinking turned way too focused for anything imaginative to be born from it; Jewish outreach is not for a person like me who grew up in a sheltered environment and who gags over all or most exposure to secular society; and playing with children, well, I’m way too intellectual to know what to do with such purely emotional beings.

I would’ve left it at that, but over the past six months my reality began to shake. It didn’t quite topple over, but I’m trying to steady it before it does.

You see, recently, I sat in on a chemistry class. As many of you know, chemistry involves math and for me math involves anxiety. But somehow, as I sat in on the class I didn’t feel anxious and I actually enjoyed the material. It was very strange. Did something suddenly turn on in my brain that made me know and like the math? Was I really good at it? And why wasn’t I feeling uptight and nervous? I tried to draw out the anxiety I always felt when in my classes of old, but then I thought better of it and decided to just let it be.

But I walked out of there in a daze.

Creative writing. Okay, I used to be good at it, but not anymore. I haven’t written a creative piece in ages – except that a few months back something possessed me to try my hand at writing a creative story, and lo and behold, it turned out pretty good. I thought I would try to earn a few bucks for it so I sent it off to a magazine for possible publication. Okay, I’ll admit that they accepted it. I wrote a few more stories since then and a few more got published, but it’s hard to imagine myself as a writer.

I mean, I’m a writer of sorts, but certainly not the creative type.

And Jewish outreach? I don’t know what to make of this, but during the summer I got a job at a kiruv school where I tutored a bunch of students. I think they learned well and they kind of liked me too, but, really, I only helped them a bit with textual stuff and tried to answer a few of their questions as best as I was able. I keep in touch with them on a fairly regular basis, but I still don’t think I’m the kiruv type. As I said, I’m too sheltered to really be comfortable with such different walks of life.

Playing with children is also something I don’t do. I would do it if I knew what to do, but I don’t know how kids think and even if I did, I wouldn’t know how to communicate with them. So, I was very surprised when a shy type of kid decided that she liked me and wanted to play with me. I mean, all I did was smile at her! I decided to try out this new experience before going back to the same old me who doesn’t know what to do with kids. I asked the little girl what she wanted to play and suggested that she get a book and that I would read it to her. She did. It was nice, but it was weird. It was hard to believe that it was me playing with this pipsqueak.

So, here I am stuck with a whole bunch of confusing scenarios that threaten to topple my identity. But I’m not the kind of person who really topples so easily and I will not allow some random aberrations to create an exception. So, to reconfirm: I am not good at math, I am not a creative writer, I will not make a good outreach professional, and I don’t know what in heaven’s name to do with children. There. Now I recognize myself. That feels a whole lot better.

S. Goldfarb

Likud Beitenu’s Political Juggernaut

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

TEL AVIV – Political pundits have long debated who is the real Benjamin Netanyahu. Is he a pragmatist handcuffed by his right-wing support base and fealty to his late father’s nationalist vision? Is he a true right-wing ideologue whose apparent concessions to Israeli-Palestinian peace are but feints?

Or is he merely a political survivor willing to do whatever it takes to stay in office, ideology be damned?

Last week’s surprise announcement that Netanyahu’s Likud Party and Avigdor Lieberman’s nationalist Yisrael Beiteinu party would merge their candidate slates in the upcoming election – but not merge their parties – offers some signs that the smart money is on the right-wingers.

The move deals a potential knockout blow to Netanyahu’s left-wing rivals and makes a third term for Netanyahu more likely than ever. Some polls show the two parties losing seats as a result of the deal, but even low estimates predict them to be the Knesset’s largest list.

Lieberman’s nationalist agenda also will likely gain further traction in the next government. That agenda has included legislation requiring loyalty oaths for new non-Jewish Israeli citizens and a ban on settlement boycotts – moves that many Israeli and American Jewish critics have slammed as undemocratic.

“The real government reform starts now,” Lieberman said at a news conference Thursday night. “We advance to finish the work.”

Critics worry that with the merger, Netanyahu has unambiguously embraced Lieberman’s hard-line domestic platform.

“The prime minister is essentially signaling that he has chosen the extremist, pro-settlement right, that he has chosen to walk in place, not to make progress in the diplomatic process,” Zehava Gal-On, head of the left-wing Meretz party, told Israel’s Army Radio, according to Reuters.

Not that the Orthodox parties will be happy with the deal.

Lieberman, a secular immigrant from the former Soviet republic of Moldova, is one of Israel’s most prominent anti-haredi politicians. He wants Israel to allow civil marriage in addition to religious marriage, and he has railed against government privileges granted to haredim. The current coalition’s tensest moments came this past summer when Lieberman and the haredi parties battled over whether to require army service for haredi youths who had previously received exemptions to study Torah.

In that battle, Netanyahu sided with the haredim, breaking up the committee assigned to draft a new military service law.

The merger represents a real triumph for Lieberman. He founded Yisrael Beiteinu in 1999 as a right-wing party for Russian constituents, then quickly broadened its appeal. In 2009, when Israel last held elections, Yisrael Beiteinu won 15 of the Knesset’s 120 seats, becoming the nation’s third-largest party. Lieberman was awarded the coveted post of foreign minister, which he will retain should the joint list lead the next government.

In the elections scheduled for Jan. 22, Netanyahu’s party was previously expected to win a plurality of votes, but there has been talk among Israel’s left and centrist parties of creating an alliance to challenge Likud. Since the elections were announced, rumors have swirled about former prime minister Ehud Olmert or former opposition leader Tzipi Livni, both of the centrist Kadima Party, returning to politics and uniting a joint center-left list.

HaLikud Beiteinu, however, is expected to win more votes than any center-left party. Polls before the merger showed Likud winning 29 seats and Yisrael Beiteinu winning close to its current 15 seats. One poll following the merger showed the new list winning 42 seats, while another put it at 35 – still much greater than the 23 predicted for the left-wing Labor Party.

Under the agreement, the parties will join for the election but remain independent after the vote. Lieberman will be No. 2 on the list, behind Netanyahu.

Some Likud politicians, led by Michael Eitan, opposed the move because of discomfort with Lieberman’s ideology as well as concern the party will lose seats in the election. But a Likud Central Committee vote approved the merger.

“The time has come to unite for the state of Israel,” Netanyahu said during the news conference announcing the merger. “We ask for a mandate to lead Israel with strength.”

He said the beefed-up party would allow him to more effectively combat Iran’s suspected nuclear weapons program, fight terrorism, and make domestic social and economic changes. Netanyahu said reducing the cost of living in Israel is one of his top priorities.

Ben Sales and Uriel Heilman

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/politics/likud-yisrael-beiteinu-election-merger-creates-political-juggernaut/2012/11/01/

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