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September 30, 2014 / 6 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘location’

Happy Ramadan

Friday, July 20th, 2012

100,000 Muslims just completed their Friday prayers on the first day of Ramadan on the Temple Mount – without any reports of violence, attacks, or rioting on either the Temple Mount or in the Old City of Jerusalem.

During the Ramadan holiday, observant Muslims fast during the day, and hold festive family meals in the evening going late into the night. In Israel the evening celebrations are often accompanied by fireworks displays.

We want to wish all our Muslim readers a happy and peaceful Ramadan.

 

Update: We just received this picture from Friday.

In response to the comments left, as can be seen in the photo, prayer is faced away from the location of the Jewish Temple and the Dome of the Rock.

 

 

New Bill Envisions Large Scale Settlement Uprooting, Attempts to Protect Victims

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Pinui Pitzui (compensation for evacuation) was an idea proposed by the far-left party Meretz as incentive to the Jews of Gush Katif: anyone who leaves his home before the deadline date, would be compensated amply. The assumption behind this suggestion was that most settlers chose life in the disputed territories because of cheap housing and government subsidies. In the end very few settlers took the bait.

A bill proposed on Tuesday by National Union chairman Yaacov Katz (Ketzaleh) will require the government to build new homes and infrastructure for residents of outposts and settlements before they are demolished. For a party so strongly identified with the ideals of settling everywhere in Eretz Israel but especially in the “disputed territories,” the bill sounded an awful lot like Pinui Pitzui.

Co-sponsored by five Haredi MKs – and so far not by Katz’s own faction members – the bill, titled “Preservation of the Rights of Evacuees 5772-2012,” is intended to “maintain the basic human rights and the fabric of life of a group of citizens slated to be evacuated.”

The bill states that an evacuation of a large group (20 or more housing units) can only be done after a new location has been determined in which the evacuees can continue their lives in the manner to which they had grown accustomed. This means that the new location must have an infrastructure in place, as well as comparable education and religious service to those they leave behind. The new location must also offer employment for everyone that is comparable in terms of character, pay, and commuting time. Otherwise the evacuees are entitled to unemployment compensation for 24 months.

This is the famous “key for key” exchange which Gush Katif settlers were demanding at the time, meaning – instead of giving us money, give us the key to a new home and a new life that our comparable to what we are asked to give up – and then we’ll give you the key to our home.

In addition, the Finance Ministry must have in place the entire amount slated for reparations to the evacuees, above and beyond the arrangements for resettling.

“If, after we’ve objected and fought and demonstrated, and, God forbid, lost, and the state of Israel has decided to kick Jews out of their home,” Katz’s spokesman Harel Cohen, told the Jewish Press, “and, by the way, not only Jews, anyone, it cannot do it before it built them a home elsewhere, to start their lives anew.”

Cohen said the bill intends to prevent a repeat of the terrible injustice that Sharon has done to the Gush Katif evacuees, about which he says there’s a wall-to-wall consensus – as  seven years after their uprooting, most of the evacuees still do not live in permanent homes.

I told him that to an outside observer the bill looked like the foundation for a wholesale transfer of Jews from Judea and Samaria. Cohen denied this in no uncertain terms, saying the idea is to force the government to build a new Gish Katif before it takes down an old one.

It certainly appears that the right and the settlers are maturing and getting used to being associated with the ruling majority, and learning to play politics. It also explains why five members of Shas and one from United Torah Judaism are co-sponsoring the bill, as they could probably teach their national religious brethren a thing or two about exacting a price for their cooperation with government.

Cohen told me that the dean of Beit El Yeshiva and Katz’s mentor Rabbi Zalman Melamed was pushing this legislation as far back as a year ago, and at the time even Katz had difficulty with the concept – much as his three faction colleagues still do, apparently, today.

“It sounded to him like a conditional agreement” for evacuation, Cohen explained. But a year later, having agonized over the arduous process of losing the Ulpana Hill neighborhood at the High Court without even getting their opportunity to argue back, Ketzalaeh and everyone else in Beit El can certainly envision the worst happening again.

Kosher Delight Has Slung Its Last Burger

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

Kosher Delight, one of the longest surviving kosher establishments in Manhattan, sold its last burger on June 17.

Since opening in 1984, the restaurant has been a fixture for any Jewish tourists visiting New York and almost every religious Jew in the city has eaten there at least once. The news was originally posted by Dani Klein on his blog, YeahThatsKosher.com. He said that reaction has been mixed since he had started blogging about the closing.

“A lot of people say it’s about time, and a lot of people are complaining: what am I going to do before the Knicks or Rangers game?” Klein said. “It’s a mainstay for our generation. I happen to love the Double Delight. I still think it’s one of the best burgers if you like that type of burger.”

Klein had reservations though.

“It definitely wasn’t the cleanest place,” he said. “If you ever went down to the bathroom, not only was it scary but it smelled like dead chickens.”

Klein said he wasn’t sure about the reasons for the closure, but suspected it had to do with declining sales and health food violations. His blog quoted the most recent New York Restaurant report that cited seven violations, five of which were rated as major. In the inspection prior to that, the restaurant received a grade of A. The restaurant was written up for 49 violations.

Ratings for the restaurant according to Yelp, the online review site, were negative.

Zechariah Mehler, a kosher food critic for Long Island-based newspaper, The Jewish Star, said he believed declining standards had led to the closure.

“Even by the standards of fast food, the quality of KD had been declining over the past few years,” said Mehler. “That decline, mixed with the rising number of fast food and lunch spots in the area must have seriously impacted the restaurant.”

A person identifying themselves as a member of the Huberfeld family that owned the Kosher Delight in midtown and the one in Brooklyn said that the closure was caused by simply a new lease.

“After 28 years at this location, the current landlord did not offer a lease renewal to Kosher Delight at a price that Kosher Delight could afford,” the Huberfelds’ impromptu spokesman said. “Sales have remained consistent over the last several years. Different competitors have come and gone, but our strong and loyal customer base has remained and contributed to our success. As a matter of fact, as news of the store’s pending closure circulated, we received hundreds and hundreds of emails asking if we plan on re-opening.”

The spokesman said that the Brooklyn location on Avenue J, which has been open since 1979, will continue operating.

In many ways, blogger Klein said, the closure of Kosher Delight was emblematic of a larger trend in kosher food.

“I think that we’re seeing a surge in restaurants that are classier — even cheaper restaurants that are cleaner and more modern,” Klein explained. “We don’t expect cheap prices because kosher is never cheap, but at least we could get a clean environment with a smile. Because we keep kosher… doesn’t mean we need to sacrifice quality and ambience.”

Kosher Delight is the third kosher restaurant in Manhattan to close down this year. Clubhouse Cafe, owned by the Le Marais restaurant, closed last week. According to Klein, Clubhouse was forced out by a new owner who is turning the building into a mall.

Klein says Clubhouse is looking for a new location and the owners expect to rebuild in half-a-year.

J2 Pizza, which billed itself as “The Most Famous Kosher Pizza Place in the World” and whose wall was littered with pictures of famous celebrities who visited the midtown restaurant, left their pervious location and moved to 35th street and 5th and 6th avenue.

Klein claims that this was also due to a rent increase combined with being shut down several times for health code violations. The restaurant now operates under the name “The Jerusalem Cafe.”

“J2 was very much affected by the neighboring restaurants,” said Zechariah Mehler. “Plus they had been shut down so many times by the New York Board of Health, they knew that their name needed to be changed for them to survive. As if that would make us forget their there salad bar lacked a sneeze guard.”

Technion Sues Microsoft for $6.5 Mil. over Intellectual Property

Monday, June 11th, 2012

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology has filed a NIS 25,000,000 ($6,500,000) lawsuit against the Microsoft Corp, reports the website Calcalist.

The lawsuit, filed last week in the District Court in Petach Tikvah, alleges that Microsoft used intellectual property developed by Technion professor Ran Smorodinsky.

The extraordinary lawsuit opens: “For years, Microsoft has taken aggressive enforcement steps against anyone who held software belonging to Microsoft without legal permits, regardless of from whom and when it was purchased, their geographic location and whether they were rich or poor.”

The Technion is going up against the technology giant, citing illegal uses of technology which was developed by the institution’s staff.

This is a unique suit with which the Technion is marking its overall intent to receive a portion of intellectual property developed by its faculty.

The suit was submitted two and a half years after the state of Israel had filed a similar suit against the drug company Omrix and its founder Robert Taub, arguing that the development of “biological glue” is a product of research done by Prof. Uriel Martinovic, a state employee at the Tel-Hashomer medical center.

In 2008, Microsoft acquired the intellectual property of the startup YaData for approximately $150 million. The Technion now argues that all the intellectual products of the company resulted from research work done by Rann Smorodinsky, a full-time tenured professor in the School of Industrial Engineering.

“Intellectual property rights, technology and knowledge products belong to the Technion – like all fruits of the labor of faculty members,” reads the lawsuit.

The suit alleges that the restriction on the transfer of intellectual property did not escape the notice of the original company founders. In September 2006, the Technion gave a limited approval to Professor Smorodinsky to transfer the company’s intellectual property, provided that the counseling that he himself gave was limited areas of commercial business.

“If the request to expand the areas of counseling beyond the scope of commercial business, please fill inform us and the issue will be explored,” says the same permit.

In retrospect, the Technion now argues, the company violated the permit and engaged the professor in developing its products. Smorodinsky contacted the Technion in October 2007 to extend the permit, without success.

The Technion says that all one has to do to refute “the claim that there is no connection between the scope of Professor Smorodinsky’s area of specialty at the Technion – game theory (the study of strategic decision making) – and his activity at YaData and later at Microsoft, is to quote the professor himself.”

Microsoft Israel has issued a statement saying they were studying the suit and will respond shortly.

‘Return to Auschwitz’ To Be Broadcast On WPBT2

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

Join three Holocaust survivors for an emotional visit to the nightmarish location they only barely survived, the place where they lost so many of the people they loved. WPBT2 will broadcast the special “March of the Living: Return to Auschwitz” on June 17 at noon and June 19 at 7:30 pm.

The special produced by CBS4 features reporter Ted Scouten walking side by side with these individuals to hear their firsthand accounts of life at the Auschwitz death camp, the symbol for the horrors that were propagated within the Nazi’s system of concentration camps.

More than 1.5 million men, women and children were murdered at Auschwitz, either in gas chambers or by being brutally worked to death. With fewer people alive to tell their stories of what transpired, these brave South Florida survivors want to ensure that no one will ever forget the horror and terror that accompanied the Nazi occupation.

Funding for “March of the Living: Return to Auschwitz” was made possible by Zimmerman Advertising.

For more information on CBS4 and MyTV33, visit cbsmiami.com.

Ominous Déjà Vu

Friday, June 1st, 2012

Unease. Déjà vu from Sharon’s great Expulsion. It began with a column by Hagai Segal, who depicted the insistence of Migron’s residents not to move from their current location as a sort of childish stubbornness. After all, Kedumim was founded after it was moved from its original location and ultimately grew into a thriving community. So how dare those “children” of Migron, who never heard of settler leader Ze’ev “Zambish” Hever, think otherwise?

After reading that column, I already began to feel that we lost: Migron, Ulpana Hill, it doesn’t really matter what exactly will happen on the ground. Just like in Gush Katif, the struggle on the ground is really just make-believe. The real decisions on the fate of the settlements are being made in an entirely different place where the principle has already been determined, or, to be more specific, preserved. Now it is just a question of price. The deal is really being closed between the settler leaders with the same old Sebastia/Kfar Maimon mentality and the prime minister’s advisers.

I recently spent time attending meetings with Likud ministers, trying to convince them to vote in favor of the Ulpana Law. In a lively two-hour conversation, one minister analyzed the entire scheme of considerations and pressures with which the government is dealing. He left no stone unturned as he explained the facts in detail and analyzed them once again. But he gave me no answer.

When we got up to leave, I said to him, “You know, there is a certain moment in which all the right answers are no longer relevant. The political outcome is really not important. There is a certain space that you enter, without even realizing that you are there. But if you continue from that space to make all of these logical calculations, you lose everything.”

“That is true,” said the minister, “but we are not in that space.”

And then I understood the problem: “we are not in that space.” And we are not there because of the same mentality that plagued us in Gush Katif. The destruction of Migron and the Ulpana Hill doesn’t move us into that space. The victims are still being represented by the same Yesha Council, whose very existence will always ensure that we do not reach the space in which the settlers and their tens of thousands of supporters will embark on a genuine struggle to save their land.

We thought we were going to Kfar Maimon to battle the Expulsion. But in truth, everything was already decided before we started out. Our role was to play a bit with the army. The army’s role was to be sensitive and determined. Afterwards, we cried. It was everything but a struggle. The role of the Yesha Council was to ensure that we would never get to that space – to the genuine struggle.

The entire settler establishment is dependent on government funding. Even more, it is mentally dependent on the government. They refuse to understand that Judea and Samaria are “out,” that the reality has changed since the good old days of Sebastia and Menachem Begin. Judea and Samaria no longer exist in Israel’s long-term plans. All they are is a huge white blotch in the middle of the map of Israel. The only new settlement currently being built by Israel is Ruabi – for the Arabs.

True, in the midst of this strategic process, Zambish can still get authorization for a public building here and there. But the strategic picture is the negative of the gleeful days of Sebastia. The enticement to remain on good terms with the establishment, the source of the Yesha Council’s power, blinds them to the necessity to fight it.

When Migron will, God forbid, be destroyed, or when the homes on Ulpana Hill will be sealed (or even have a worse fate thrust upon them), the Yesha Council will decry the destruction. Nobody expects otherwise. Their role is to ensure that there will be no genuine struggle. They will guarantee that we will once again be dragged from our homes like harmless sacks of potatoes, while the country will continue with business as usual. Our rightist journalists will write terrible things about Prime Minister Netanyahu. The hilltop youth will continue to hate the state. Everyone will play his role in the grand drama whose finale has already been written.

Video: Under the Prayer Shawl – Secrets of the Priestly Blessing

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

“Under the Prayer Shawl – Secrets of the Priestly Blessing”, was shot on location at the 2011 annual massive blessing by the Jewish Priests (Kohanim) at the Western Wall (Kotel) in Jerusalem during the Passover festival. The Kohanim (priests) are Jews descended directly from Aaron, the older brother of the Biblical Moses, who was given the special duty to bless the nation of Israel. See how this mystical practice continues today and how it has passed, in surprising ways, into world culture.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/under-the-prayer-shawl-secrets-of-the-priestly-blessing/2012/04/10/

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