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November 27, 2014 / 5 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Maariv’

Maariv: Iran Said ‘No’ to Obama’s Plea for Reconciliation

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

A few months after he had been elected, President Barack Obama attempted to renew on a gradual basis U.S. diplomatic relations with Iran, a process that was to lead to establishing embassies and full diplomatic relations. But the Islamic Republic rejected the proposal out of fear for the future of the reign of the Ayatollahs, the Israeli daily Maariv reported on Sunday. The paper claims to have received this information from two Western diplomatic sources close to the Administration.

The American offer was part of an inclusive change of approach to U.S. foreign relations instituted by Obama upon his entry into the White House. The plan was focused on emphasizing negotiations and extending a “diplomatic hand.” Shortly after being elected, the new president announced that he intended to extended his hand to Iran. An announcement of the White House declared that Obama supports “an aggressive and direct diplomacy with Iran, without preconditions.” This was a 180 degree change of the Bush Administration’s approach to Iran. The new Administration was hoping that a rapprochement with Iran would help establish a mutual understanding with Iran regarding its nuclear plan.

At the initial stage, the Americans offered the Iranians the opening of government interests offices—the lowest level of diplomatic relations—in Tehran and Washington. Later on, the Administration was hoping to enter a track of detailed agreements.

Relations between the United States and Iran were severed in 1979, at the conclusion of the Islamic revolution and the ascent of the Ayatollah Khomeini.

According to Maariv, at least two direct meetings were conducted between U.S. and Iran officials starting in the summer of 2009.

Under Secretary of State William Burns and the Iranian head of the negotiations team Saeed Jalili participated in at least one of the two meetings. The two met following the six powers’ meeting with Iran in October of 2009, in Geneva. That direct meeting lasted about an hour. According to an Israeli source close to the negotiations, the Islamic Republic was leery of any sign of normalizing relations with the U.S., and refused to give the Americans “an award.” Iran’s main concern was that the Ayatollah’s regime would be weakened as a consequence of American involvement in Iranian society.

The Administration so far has denied a NY Times report on a new attempt to open a channel of communication with Iran. The White House statement on October 20 read:

It’s not true that the United States and Iran have agreed to one-on-one talks or any meeting after the American elections. We continue to work with the P5+1 on a diplomatic solution and have said from the outset that we would be prepared to meet bilaterally. The President has made clear that he will prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, and we will do what we must to achieve that. It has always been our goal for sanctions to pressure Iran to come in line with its obligations. The onus is on the Iranians to do so, otherwise they will continue to face crippling sanctions and increased pressure.

Don’t Blame Adelson For Collapse Of Israel’s Monolithic Liberal Media

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

Liberal pundits have coined a new saw: Sheldon Adelson and the newspaper he owns, Israel Hayom, are primarily responsible for the collapse of many Israeli media outlets, and this endangers Israeli democracy.

The assertion is wrong on both the business and ideological levels.

The imminent failures of Maariv and Channel 10 television, and the deep troubles of Haaretz and other smaller publications, are first and foremost the function of long-term market forces, such as the advent of Internet news sites, that predate Israel Hayom.

Maariv’s downward slope began long before Israel Hayom debuted in 2007, which explains why Maariv was bought and sold four times – always at a loss – over the past 20 years. Its consistently terrible management and lack of brand positioning spelled its doom.

The same for Channel 10. The same for the Davar, Hadashot and Hatzofe newspapers – all of which have folded over the past 20 years. Sheldon Adelson had nothing to do with these bankruptcies.

Undoubtedly, some readers have moved from Maariv, Yediot Aharonot and Haaretz to Israel Hayom because the latter is distributed free. These readers also may have discovered that Israel Hayom is a good paper, with solid editing, experienced reporters, comprehensive coverage and a fine lineup of sharp columnists (full disclosure: including me).

But Israel Hayom also has tens of thousands of subscribers who pay for home delivery. And now Maariv and Yediot are distributing tens of thousands of free copies every day, too, on trains and in shopping malls across Israel.

What really irks the veteran Israeli media outlets is that readers have abandoned them for ideological reasons. Readers fled Yediot and Maariv because they became crass, trashy publications dominated by glossy features about models, actors, singers, rich playboys and the “true heroes” of Israel – journalists themselves.

By contrast, Israel Hayom features academics, scientists, pioneers, and Zionist and social activists. It also promotes hiking and travel within Israel, not the casinos in Greece, the restaurants in Rome or the fleshpots of Thailand.

Readers also edged away from Maariv, Yediot and Haaretz because of the deep gap that opened between the left-wing ideological viewpoint peddled by these publications and the healthy, increasingly conservative instincts of the Israeli public.

Those papers idolized Shimon Peres and his “new Middle East,” puffed up Yasir Arafat and promoted the Oslo process long after its failure was clear, and they lionized Ariel Sharon and pumped for Gaza disengagement while ignoring Sharon family corruption.

Yediot and Haaretz also regularly dump on Jerusalem, Israel’s largest city, as medieval and backwards while exalting Tel Aviv as cool and cultured. They sneer at Orthodox Judaism and mock religious Jews. They disparage Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu with savage vehemence and fanatical constancy. Not a month goes by without Yediot conjuring up some nasty, cockamamie story about Netanyahu’s wife, Sarah.

For Haaretz, Israel can do no right and the Palestinians can do no wrong.

There’s more. In the 1970s and ‘80s, Yediot under editor Dov Yudkovsky, and to a lesser extent Maariv under editors Rosenfeld, Shnitzer and Dissenchik, became razor-sharp media watchdogs, launching one investigative report after another into government and financial sector corruption. They were papers with values and an edge.

But under Yediot publisher and acting editor Noni Mozes, and under Maariv’s disgraced and jailed publisher Ofer Nimrodi and current owner Nochi Dankner, the last decade has been dismal. The papers became enmeshed in promoting the financial and political careers of Israel’s liberal elites and the vested business interests of the publishers themselves. They often defended corrupt politicians and attacked attorney generals and the system of law enforcement. They came to represent the interests of their owners’ business and political connections, not the public interest. This is a real threat to democracy.

It’s no surprise that Israel’s top crime-busting investigative journalist, Mordechai Gilat, left Yediot in disgust after a 30-year career there. Gilat now writes for Israel Hayom.

Israel’s Ted Koppel, a journalist named Dan Margalit – former editor of Maariv, anchor of Israel’s top TV political debate program and the man who exposed Yitzhak Rabin’s financial misdemeanors – is Israel Hayom’s senior political and diplomatic columnist.

It’s also no surprise that Yediot and Maariv are now running an unabashed, aggressive campaign promoting the return to politics and national prominence of Ehud Olmert and Aryeh Deri, both of whom earned reputations as corrupt politicians and both with criminal convictions. And lo and behold, both happen to share left-of-center political orientations.

Parshas Bereishis

Friday, October 12th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 41                             5773

 

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
October 12, 2012 – 26 Tishrei 5773
5:59 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 7:03 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Bereishis
Weekly Haftara: Koh Amar Hashem (Isaiah 42:5- 43:10)
Daf Yomi: Shabbos 9
Mishna Yomit: Nedarim 11:10-11
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 135:6-8
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Tum’as Ochlin chap. 1-3
Earliest time for tallis and tefillin: 6:10 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:53 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim, Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan is two days, Tuesday and Wednesday.

This Shabbos all tefillos as usual. There is no Hazkaras Neshamos (Av HaRachamim and Kel Malei) and at Mincha we do not say Tzidkas’cha. The molad is Monday afternoon, 41 minutes and 9 chalakim (a chelek is 1/18 of a minute) after 2:00 p.m. in Jerusalem.

Monday Eve: Rosh Chodesh,: at Maariv we add Ya’aleh VeYavo. (However, if one forgot to include Ya’aleh VeYavo (at Maariv only) one does not repeat. The Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1 on Berachos 30b explains that this is due to the fact that we do not sanctify the month at night.)

   Tuesday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh, half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah from the Ark. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the Baal Keriah recites half-Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Aron, Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon – we delete La’menatze’ach, the chazzan recites half-Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin.

Musaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by Reader’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Sefarad say shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half-Hallel, and before Aleinu they add Ein KeElokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, which we also add to Birkas Hamazon, as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Tuesday evening and Wednesday, 2nd day Rosh Chodesh, the order of the day is the same as yesterday. Kiddush Levana at first opportunity (from the third evening after the molad), Thursday evening, until the (entire) evening of Tuesday, the 15th of Cheshvan.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142 – Y.K.

Polls Indicate Netanyahu Will Score in New Elections

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s call to disband the government and call for new elections may serve him well, if two public opinion polls published Thursday pan out.

A poll commissioned and published by Maariv newspaper shows the prime minister’s Likud party would increase its seats from 27 to 29, with Labor taking 17 and Yair Lapid’s Yesh Atid taking 17.

A Haaretz poll shows that a coalition led by Likud and joined by religious and nationalist parties would also increase two seats, from 66 to 68.

Defense Minister Ehud Barak’s Independence party is not expected to attract enough voters to yield any seats.

Parshas Ha’azinu

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 39                                 5773

 

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
September 28, 2012 – 12 Tishrei 5773
6:22 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: 7:26 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Ha’azinu
Weekly Haftara: VaYedabber David (II Samuel 22:1-51)

Daf Yomi: Berachos 58
Mishna Yomit: Nedarim 8:7-9:1
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 128:25-27
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Tum’as Tzara’as, chap. 8-10
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:55 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:48 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

 Shabbos: All tefillos as customary, except we do not say Av HaRachamim nor do we make Ke-l Moleh Rachamim, nor Tzidkos’cha, and at Maariv, Motza’ei Shabbos we do not say Vi’yehi Noam v’Atah Kadosh.

Sunday, erev Sukkos: Aside from our erev Yom Tov preparations, we have to make sure that the sukka we will use is finished and ready to accommodate us for fulfilling the mitzva of eating and sleeping in the sukka. This is also the last opportunity to acquire the Four Species: esrog, lulav, hadassim and aravos. These should preferably be of exceptional quality – mehuddarim – but have to satisfy, at the very least, the minimum requirements qualifying them as kosher to fulfill the mitzva (see Orach Chayyim 645‑650, Hilchot Lulav).

We light candles at 6:21 p.m., N.Y.C. E.D.T. that is, 20 minutes before shekiah (sunset), and recite Lehadlik ner shel Yom Tov as well as Shehecheyanu. Mincha: Usual weekday tefilla. Maariv: Usual service for Yom Tov, as found in the Machzor. The Shemoneh Esreh is that of Shalosh Regalim. At the conclusion of the Shemoneh Esreh the chazzan says Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, LeDavid Hashem Ori (Sefarad have said LeDavid Hashem Ori following Mincha) and their respective Mourner’s Kaddish recitals.

In congregations where it is the custom to recite Kiddush in the synagogue after Maariv, Kiddush can only be publicly recited in synagogues where a sukka is available.

Eating in the sukka: Upon returning home we do not tarry but go straight to the sukka (lest it rain later on). We recite the appropriate Ushpizin (lit. invitation of guests) to welcome to our sukka the seven faithful shepherds of the people of Israel – Avraham, Yitzhak, Yaakov, Yosef, Moshe, Aharon and David Hamelech. On each of the seven days one of them is the guest of honor leading the others, starting with our Patriarch Avraham on the first night. We then recite the Kiddush of Yom Tov. We say four berachos: Borei pri hagafen, Mekaddesh Yisrael ve’hazemanim, Leishev basukka, and Shehecheyanu.

On the first night one is duty‑bound to eat in the sukka even if it involves tza’ar (pain). This does not apply on the other nights and days, when one who is extremely uncomfortable (due to rain, or extreme cold, etc.) is relieved of this obligation (see Orach Chayyim 640:4 and Rema ad loc., who qualifies this halacha; see also 639:2, Rema, regarding sleeping in the sukka).

If it rains on the first evening (and the rain is such that it is not likely to stop), we make Kiddush in the sukka, we wash (for bread) and eat a kezayit (olive‑size) piece of challah in the sukka, and then return to the house to eat the rest of the meal. (Commenting on a discussion regarding how long one is required to wait for the rain to stop, the Mishna Berura (O.C. 639:5) notes that it is proper to wait no longer than until midnight.)

In Birkas Hamazon we say Ya’aleh VeYavo and HaRachaman hu yakim lanu es sukkas David hanofales during the seven days of Sukkos. Each meal (or snack) requires the blessing of Leishev basukka as well as the appropriate berachos for the various foods.

Shacharis, Monday morning: Pesukei DeZimra, and chazzan chants from HaKeil. Kerias Shema follows the weekday pattern, then the silent Shemoneh Esreh of Shalosh Regalim, followed by the chazzan’s repetition.

Lulav and Esrog: We take the lulav (to which 3 hadassim are bound on the right side and 2 aravos on the left side – see Mishna Berura, Orach Chayyim 651:1) in our right hand and the esrog (upside down, the pitom facing downside) in our left hand and recite the berachaAl netilas lulav …” in a manner oveir le’asiyasan, that is, before we have physically accomplished the taking of the lulav and esrog. We next recite Shehecheyanu with the esrog in an upright position (the pitom facing upward) and wave the lulav in six directions.

Parshas Vayelech

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 38 5773

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
September 21, 2012 – 5 Tishrei 5773
6:34 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 7:38 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Vayelech
Weekly Haftara: Shuvah Yisrael (Hosea 14:2-10)
Daf Yomi: Berachos 51
Mishna Yomit: Nedarim 7:2-3
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 128:4-6
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Parah Adumah, chap. 2-4
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:48 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:45 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

During the week between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur we perform the kapparos (atonement) ritual by making a substitute offering to Hashem. This is customarily done with a live chicken, but a live fish may also be used, and one can even give money for charity. The text of the accompanying prayer is found in the Yom Kippur Machzor.

This coming Shabbos is commonly referred to as Shabbos Shuvah, either due to its unique position during the days of repentance between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, or because of the Haftara, “Shuvah Yisrael” (Hosea 14:2‑10; Joel 2:15‑27 – some add Micah 7:18‑20) which we read on that Shabbos. Some refer to it as Shabbos Teshuva.

We recite the usual Shabbos prayers with all the textual changes and additions for Aseres Yemei Teshuva (Hamelech Hakadosh replaces HaKeil Hakadosh, Zochrenu lechayyim is added, etc.).

It is traditional for the rabbi to deliver a special Shabbos Shuva derasha consisting of Halacha and Aggada matters.

Mincha: as usual (with textual changes as above).

Maariv, Mot’za’ei Shabbos: all tefillos as usual however, no Vi’yehi Noam Ve’Ata Kadosh.

Tuesday morning Shacharis (Erev Yom Kippur): We recite the Selichos for Erev Yom Kippur, which consist of the shortest Selichos text of the year. We do not say Mizmor L’soda, Avinu Malkeinu nor Tachanun. After chatzos (midday, 12:50 p.m. E.D.T. in N.Y.C.) we immerse in the mikveh to ritually purify ourselves.

It is customary to partake of [a] festive meal[s] on Erev Yom Kippur since it is a positive precept to feast on that day (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 604:1; see also the Taz ad loc. – quoting Berachos 8b – that one should reduce his Torah learning on that day in order to fast well on Yom Kippur, and that “one who feasts and drinks on the 9th [of Tishrei] is considered as if he fasted on both the 9th and the 10th of Tishrei.”

Mincha is the usual weekday tefilla: Ashrei, half‑Kaddish and the Shemoneh Esreh; before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra” we insert the Viddui (confessional) whose text is found in the Machzor.

We are careful to complete the Seuda Mafsekes, the final meal before the fast, while it is yet day in order to add from the mundane to the holy, le’hosif michol al hakodesh (i.e., from the 9th day to the 10th day).

It is customary to light yahrzeit candles for the departed souls [of relatives] since we say Yizkor on Yom Kippur.

The beracha for lighting the candles is “Le’hadlik ner shel Yom Hakippurim,” followed by “Shehecheyanu.”

Kol Nidrei (6:29 p.m. N.Y.C., E.D.T.). We arrive at the synagogue early and don both kittel and tallis. (If one dons the tallis before sunset, he recites the blessing “le’his’atef batzitzis.”)

We remove two of the Sifrei Torah from the Ark and the chazzan, flanked by two of the congregation’s leaders, intones the Kol Nidrei prayer. The chazzan recites the Shehecheyanu, which the congregation says with him in an undertone (except for those who recited the Shehecheyanu at home when lighting the candles).

Maariv: We follow the text of the Machzor. At Kerias Shema we say “Baruch Shem Kevod Malchuso” aloud (on this day we are likened to the angels who praise Hashem with these words). The chazzan says half‑Kaddish and we recite the Shemoneh Esreh. Before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra” we add the Viddui.

Following the Shemoneh Esreh the chazzan and congregation chant various Piyyutim and recite the Viddui. We conclude with Avinu Malkenu, Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, LeDavid Hashem Ori and their respective Kaddish recitals (Nusach Sefarad say LeDavid Mizmor following the Shemoneh Esreh and then continue with Piyyutim as above.)

When we wake up in the morning we perform Netilas Yadayim by washing our fingers up to the knuckles only.

Abbas Says He Will Go Ahead with UN Bid Speech

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

P.A. President Mahmoud Abbas reiterated on Wednesday that he will deliver a speech at the General Assembly of the United Nations to ask for recognition of Palestine as a non-member state, Ma’an reported.

The comments, which were posted on the president’s Facebook page, added that the speech would most likely take place on September 27.

“As in every year I will be tell the whole world about the suffering of my people under the Israeli occupation and its settlements, settler attacks and violations on a daily basis which contradict the United Nations and international law,” the comments said.

“We are determined despite all pressure and I am confident that you will all support my request.”

Abbas also announced that he will make a 10-day visit to Turkey in the coming week, noting that the country has always supported the Palestinian cause.

The United States opposed Abbas’ 2011 bid for UN membership, which got stuck at the Security Council, where the US has veto power.

Meanwhile, Maariv reported, citing Palestinian sources, that Abbas is planning to retire and has instructed his aids to find a replacement by the time he is back from the U.S.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/abbas-says-he-will-go-ahead-with-un-bid-speech/2012/09/20/

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