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August 31, 2014 / 5 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘magazine’

God is Always There

Monday, April 16th, 2012

God is always there, waiting for you to stretch out your little pinky so that He can tug on it and engulf you in a never-ending warm hug.

God had a treasure house of blessing to shower you with, all you needed to do was place your hand on the faucet.

You just had to whisper God’s name and He would have sat beside you, wiped your tears. and when He’s with you your life problems are as simple as typing the wrong letter and having to press the backspace button.

God had your salvation waiting from the day you left the womb, like an exquisite show waiting for someone to lift the curtain.

When you were below sea level when all was dark and the pressure was banging against your ears, when all hope was lost God appeared and you were warmed by His rays.

You were oblivious, but all a long He had faith that one day you would call upon His name.

And you didn’t.

Instead you put your trust in money and fame, and you kept sinking lower…lower…lower. All the while God was whispering in your ear “ I’m here” but your iPod volume was too high.

For a split second you thought you heard something – you lifted your head tilted it to the left with your right ear perked up.

God repeated His message – I’m right here next to you.

And then you noticed that smudge on your shoulder, you scratched if off getting dirt under your finger nail and then you turned the volume up louder.

And all the while God had faith in you.

When you could go no further, your body was spread along the sea floor, your palms were cut by the rocks, and the seaweed was itching your skin – jelly fish could not distinguish your muddy body from the gravel floor,

Then – only when you had nowhere else to turn you lifted your eyes to God. And He had mercy.

This article was originally posted on Maidelle.com, an online magazine for Jewish teen girls to speak their minds. Check ou the site and read more articles and poetry submitted by girls worldwide and join the conversation!

Soup

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

This column will focus on making cooking easy and simple. We begin with a perennial favorite dish – Chicken Soup.

There have been so many volumes written about chicken soup – so many recipes and so many ingredients. I have always thought the most important ingredient ever added to chicken soup was the love of a yiddishe mama.

Now, my chicken soup is a whole production – but I don’t cook soup every week, I use a 20 quart pot and make enough for a few weeks. And then I have more than soup. As you will see over the next few columns, when I am done, I have carrots and potatoes for potato salad, I have vegetables to make into side dishes and much more. Once you see how much one pot of soup can produce, you will agree that it is worthwhile to try.

My Chicken Soup Recipe

 

Ingredients

Water to cover, plus 3 cups

3 – 4 knuckle bones and/or other bones (I love knuckle bones, they give body and taste to the soup and are delicious to eat. Chicken bones are messy, not so flavorful and it’s hard to remove them from the soup.)

4 – 8 chicken quarters (Or more as needed)

1 – 10 carrots (Carrots add sweetness to the soup. You can put in one or ten—it’s up to you.)

1 – 2 zucchini (Zucchini is a great vegetable. It needs to cook for only a short time and can be used peeled or unpeeled.)

4 – 10 cloves garlic (Garlic adds taste and vitamins.)

1 potato (Potatoes add very little flavor to the soup, however, it is a good way to cook them for other dishes. Just keep in mind that they cook faster than some of the other vegetables and tend to sink to the bottom. If you are using them, be sure to fish them out long before the soup is ready or they will disintegrate.)

1 onion (I generally discard the onion once the soup is ready.)

1 sweet potato (This is a great soup vegetable – it adds a lot of sweetness.)

1″ – 2″ piece ginger (Ginger has a very strong taste; a little piece the size of a thumb can be detected in a large quantity of soup.)

1 kohlrabi (This is a great addition to the soup. Kohlrabi is a versatile vegetable that can be served on it’s own or added to other dishes.)

1 chayote (This vegetable can be found at most fruit stands. It looks like a flattened green pear and the taste is similar to a kohlrabi.)

1 small butternut squash

1 jicama (This vegetable is a newcomer in my kitchen, but a welcome one. It tastes like a sweet turnip.)

2 – 3 stalks celery

2 – 3 parsnips

1 celery knob

½ of a Fennel (Fennel tastes like licorice.)

¼ of a Rutabaga (Rutabaga is a large ball, half yellow and half purple.)

¼ of a head of cabbage

½ a head of Cauliflower or one bag frozen

1 bunch parsley greens (Parsley is added at the last 10 minutes of cooking.)

Salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika

About 2 tbsps chicken soup mix without MSG

Directions:

Put bones, chicken, and any other meat you would like to use that Shabbos, into your largest pot, cover with water and bring to a boil. As soon as it boiled, turn off the heat, take the whole pot to the sink and pour everything out. Rinse all the pieces and the pot, return only the chicken and meat to the pot, add enough water to cover plus 2 to 3 additional cups and bring to a boil. Then reduce heat to a low simmer.

Now add the vegetables. First add the root vegetables, the ones that cook the longest, such as carrots, kohlrabi, onions, chayote, etc. Cook until tender, remove, and add the other vegetables. Don’t forget to take out the chicken quarters after about 35-50 minutes of cooking. Last, add the parsley greens.

Simmer on low for four hours.

After putting so much effort into cooking chicken soup, don’t waste a drop. Drain the soup through a sieve; the clear soup should be stored in covered plastic or glass containers, divided according to your family size. Keep in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, skim off the fat and then put the containers into the freezer.

(By the way, any combination of the above vegetables can be used in chicken soup. If you are short on time the minimum is carrots, onion, garlic and parsley added to chicken and water. Cook for about an hour on a low flame after it has boiled.)

Where’s The Outrage?

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

When the disproportion of terrorist acts committed by Muslims – and the resulting hordes cheering the carnage on the Arab street – lead clear-minded observers to conclude that jihadism is the dominant strain in the Islamic world, we are accused of painting with an unfairly broad brush, discounting the silent (and invisible) majority of Muslims who oppose violence and crave peace.

I am ashamed at how fitting the comparison is to the current behavior of certain haredim in Beit Shemesh and parts of Jerusalem. Harassing women, terrorizing schoolgirls, assaulting police officers and journalists, vandalizing property—the so-called Sikrikim seem to have styled themselves after the Iranian vice squads. It matters not whether the perpetrators of these acts constitute 5 percent or 25 percent of the haredi community. Because all we hear from the background is a deafening silence.

There have been no public statements or rallies to oppose this outrageous behavior by those who claim to speak for them. In fact, the only rallies by haredim have been to protest the way they are being victimized by the media and Israeli authorities – including a huge rally last week in Meah Shearim featuring men in yellow “Jude” stars and children dressed in concentration camp uniforms. A handful of haredi rabbis have spoken out against the Sikrikim, but most have not, choosing to reserve their public pronouncements for other matters.

This can only lead one to conclude that a large number of haredim agree with the viewpoints espoused by the activists – even if they do not condone their tactics. They share the worldview that, as one man interviewed at the aforementioned rally was quoted as saying, “there’s only one Jewish way.” If you are not like us, you cannot profess to be frum, to love God and fear Him, to deserve basic human dignity.

Such an exclusionary – dare I say hateful – way of thinking is totally antithetical to Torah and many of its most foundational teachings: “V’ahavta l’rayacha kamocha” (Love your fellow man as yourself); “V’halachta b’drachav” (And you shall walk in His ways); “D’racheha darchei noam v’chol nesivoseha shalom” ([The Torah’s] ways are ways of pleasantness and all its paths are peace); “Derech eretz kadma laTorah” (Human decency comes before Torah). . . .

Why has the haredi leadership taken such a passive stance on this cancer metastasizing in their midst? It pains me to say this, but their silence – and that of their followers – is not surprising. The most consistent, persistent message that the extremely right-wing religious leaders send out to their followers, at least publicly, is not ahavas Yisrael, achdus, or continuous introspection. Instead, it is “Banned!” “Treif!” or “Anyone who does [X]or uses [Y] is not worthy of respect.” Whether it’s the Internet, digital cameras, smartphones, music (even by frum artists), public transportation, clothing that offers a hint of femininity, or stores with any percentage of non-mehadrin inventory, the circle of exclusion is forever expanding.

As a result, more and more people – regardless of whether they are indeed shomrei mitzvos and yarei Shamayim – fall outside the parameters of toleration. Holiness equated with quarantine will naturally give rise to disdain for anyone perceived to be “less than.” And so, I believe, this “cheirem culture” has created a monster: a society where it is seen as acceptable to lash out – physically, verbally, or otherwise – at fellow Jews.

What about the rising wave of anti-haredi – and indeed, anti-religious – sentiment in Israel, which has also given way to incidents of real harassment? Of course it is wrong. Completely indefensible. There is no excuse for attacking others (physically or verbally) who have not lifted a hand (literally or figuratively) against you, just because you find their lifestyle, or that of others who look like them, unpalatable.

But for the haredi community to cry victim – without in the same breath disavowing the actions of those who claim to represent their values – is nothing more than a red herring. The anti-haredi incidents are a backlash, and there would be no backlash had no women been heckled out of their seats on a bus and no little girls terrorized as they tried to make their way to school.

There surely are many haredim, whether in Beit Shemesh, Beitar, or even Meah Shearim, who abhor what is happening. But according to Chazal, silence is tantamount to acquiescence. So silent majorities are no bulwark at all – they are simply passive enablers of a grave chillul Hashem.

Ziona Greenwald is a full-time mother who has worked as a court attorney and magazine editor. She currently does freelance writing and editing from her home on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

I Walk Alone To Her

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Her blue eyes stare at me

With wonder and hope

My heart breaks a little

But I still turn around and go.

 

Her blue eyes stare at me

With confusion and fear

My heart breaks a little more

But I’m told to leave her alone.

 

Her blue eyes stare at me

With awe and joy

As I ignore the others,

And start to walk to her.

 

Their brown eyes glare at me

With hatred and distrust

But I don’t care what they think

For the decision is mine.

 

The above articles were originally posted on Maidelle.com, an online magazine for Jewish teen girls to speak their mind. Check out the site and read more articles and poetry submitted by girls worldwide who made the choice to use their voice.

Too Fragile a Dream

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

A dream,
A shining ball of brilliance
Held lovingly in my palm
Its sparkle shone with
The edges of my tears.
So daintily
My dream rested
Upon my hand,
Cracked and dry.
So fragile it was,
The dream of mine
Nestled there
Between Magnificence and hope,
Between
Sun rays and galaxies
Between Esoteric and real.
The dream began
To slip And drip
Watering the saplings
Of pain
In my heart.
And then it fell
Through the shallow space
Between my fingers-
And shattered
Like glass
On the rock of reality
Beneath my palm.

 

The above article was originally posted on Maidelle.com, an online magazine for Jewish teen girls to speak their mind. Check out the site and read more articles and poetry submitted by girls worldwide who made the choice to use their voice.

Branches:

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Branches, in many ways, are like people. A tree has one trunk, and extending out from it are many branches, which are all beautiful in their own unique way. Every person has many different qualities, some overlapping, some conflicting, yet all beautiful. Just like a tree, which sometimes has oddly shaped branches, the beauty of a person is often found in his quirks and oddities. But what would happen if you went over to a tree and started hacking away at all the “imperfect” branches? You would end up mutilating the tree, and what would you be left with? A pile of wood, good only for burning.

In many ways, a person is like that. If there is a part of a person that you don’t like, then you can’t just get rid of it! Like a tree, if you would merely try to get rid of the traits you don’t like, you would end up ruining the person and taking away their individuality! Just as each individual tree grows in its own direction, so too each person is an individual who can’t be squeezed into a mold of who you want them to be. Every person needs his own room to grow and blossom into the person he has the potential to.

And if there is a tree that has a serious deformation that could really destroy it, would you just take an axe and chop it off? No! You would take special pruning shears, and every so carefully and gently trim it off. And so, next time you feel like chopping off a branch, you must first decided whether it’s really necessary, and if it is, do it gently, carefully, and temper it with love.

 

The above article was originally posted on Maidelle.com, an online magazine for Jewish teen girls to speak their mind. Check out the site and read more articles and poetry submitted by girls worldwide who made the choice to use their voice.

They Said What?! Exposing the ‘Mainstream’ Media

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

The Media Research Center is out with its annual Best Notable Quotables awards – a compilation of the most outrageous and/or unintentionally revealing news media quotes from December 2010 through November 2011.

Votes were cast by a panel of 48 radio talk show hosts, magazine editors, columnists, editorial writers, and expert media observers.

The following are some of the more egregious examples of media bias and foolishness. (For the complete list, as well as the order in which they were ranked, visit www.mrc.org.)

Tea Party Terrorists

“We don’t have proof yet that this was political, but the odds are that it was. [Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords has] been the target of violence before…. Her father says that ‘the whole Tea Party’ was her enemy. And yes, she was on Sarah Palin’s infamous ‘crosshairs’ list. Just yesterday, [liberal writer] Ezra Klein remarked that opposition to health reform was getting scary. Actually, it’s been scary for quite a while, in a way that already reminded many of us of the climate that preceded the Oklahoma City bombing…. Violent acts are what happen when you create a climate of hate. And it’s long past time for the GOP’s leaders to take a stand against the hatemongers.” – New York Times columnist Paul Krugman in a 3:22 p.m. ET January 8 blog posting, less than two hours after news broke of the shooting of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

Salon’s Joan Walsh: “These people, the Tea Partiers and their friends and their enablers and their corporate friends…they have created this shrieking on the right…. They’re paying the lowest taxes in 50 years – more than 50 years, more than my lifetime – and they are still complaining. And some of them aren’t complaining. There are some good business people who know this game of chicken, in particular, is deadly and it’s wrong and it’s hostage-taking. And you shouldn’t negotiate with hostage-takers.” Host Chris Matthews: “I agree with you. I agree with you. I agree. It’s terrorism.” – MSNBC’s “Hardball,” July 5.

“If sane Republicans do not stand up to this Hezbollah faction in their midst, the Tea Party will take the GOP on a suicide mission.” – New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, July 27.

“You know what they say: Never negotiate with terrorists. It only encourages them. These last few months, much of the country has watched in horror as the Tea Party Republicans have waged jihad on the American people…. For now, the Tea Party Republicans can put aside their suicide vests. But rest assured: They’ll have them on again soon enough.” – New York Times columnist Joe Nocera, August 2.

The Object of Their Worship

“Can we just enjoy Obama for a moment? Before the policy choices have to be weighed and the hard decisions have to be made, can we just take a month or two to contemplate him the way we might contemplate a painting by Vermeer or a guitar lick by the early-seventies Rolling Stones or a Peyton Manning pass or any other astounding, ecstatic human achievement? Because twenty years from now, we’re going to look back on this time as a glorious idyll in American politics, with a confident, intelligent, fascinating president riding the surge of his prodigious talents from triumph to triumph…. ‘I am large, I contain multitudes,’ Walt Whitman wrote, and Obama lives that lyrical prophecy…. Barack Obama is developing into what Hegel called a ‘world-historical soul,’ an embodiment of the spirit of the times. He is what we hope we can be.” – Esquire’s Stephen Marche in a column for the magazine’s August 2011 issue: “How Can We Not Love Obama? Because Like It or Not, He Is All of Us.”

By calmly and meticulously overseeing the successful targeting of Osama bin Laden, President Barack Obama just proved himself – vividly, in almost biblical terms – to be an effective commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the United States.” – Ex-Newsweek correspondent and editor Howard Fineman writing at the Huffington Post, May 2.

Left-Wing Protest Promotion

“We thought we’d bring you up to date on those protesters, the Occupy Wall Street movement. As of tonight, it has spread to more than 250 American cities, more than a thousand countries – every continent but Antarctica.” – Diane Sawyer on ABC’s “World News,” October 10. On a later edition, Sawyer corrected her still-absurd hype: “…more than a thousand cities around the world.”

“Good evening. We begin tonight with what has become by any measure a pretty massive protest movement. While it goes by the official name ‘Occupy Wall Street,’ it has spread steadily and far beyond Wall Street, and it could well turn out to be the protest of this current era.” – Anchor Brian Williams leading off the October 5 NBC “Nightly News.”

“This week: people power making history. A revolt in the Midwest and a revolution sweeping across the Middle East…. Populist frustration is boiling over this week – as we’ve said, not just in the Middle East, but in the middle of this country as well.” ABC’s Christiane Amanpour opening “This Week,” February 20, referring to Wisconsin and Egypt.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/front-page/they-said-what-exposing-the-mainstream-media/2011/12/28/

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