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December 26, 2014 / 4 Tevet, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘Malala Yousafzai’

Roger Waters to Present Award at Amnesty International Event

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

From Amnesty International:

Pakistani schoolgirl and education rights campaigner Malala Yousafzai and American singer, human rights and social justice activist Harry Belafonte were today jointly announced as the recipients of Amnesty International’s Ambassador of Conscience Award for 2013.

…Roger Waters will make the presentation to Harry Belafonte accompanied by a special guest.

Yes, when Amnesty wanted to choose someone to present its highest honor, they chose someone who demonizes Jews and Israel.

Besides including the symbol of Judaism on an inflatable pig at numerous concerts, Waters recently specified how someone he disagreed with was Jewish, as if that is all that is needed to explain her odious (to him) actions.

Waters also consistently calls for the boycott of the only country in the region to respect basic human rights. For Palestinians. (As I’ve documented numerous times, the human rights record towards Palestinian by Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon and Syria are particularly odious.)

This is the person that Amnesty chooses to present a humanitarian award.

Belafonte definitely deserves to receive humanitarian awards. But he should refuse to accept any from Waters. You can tell him that on his Facebook page.

Visit Elder of Ziyon.

Watching Malala Yousafzai at the UN I Kept Wondering…

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

On Friday, before the Jewish Sabbath began we had the news on, the international TV channels, and they showed Malala Yousafzai speaking at the United Nations.

Malala Yousafzai, Girl Shot by Taliban, Makes Appeal at U.N. In a speech at the United Nations on her 16th birthday, Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for promoting education for girls in Pakistan, called on world leaders to provide “free, compulsory education” for every child. “Let us pick up our books and our pens,” Ms. Yousafzai told young leaders from 100 countries at the United Nations Youth Assembly in New York. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the only solution.” Ms. Yousafzai, noting that she was proud to be wearing a shawl that had once belonged to Benazir Bhutto, spoke in a calm, self-assured voice as she delivered her first major speech since she was shot on the left side of her head Oct. 9 on her way home from school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley.



All I kept thinking was that there are many survivors of Arab terror who should also be heard by the world.  What I’m writing, thinking, saying is not anything against Malala Yousafzai. I have nothing against her or what I heard her say.  I just wish that we could be as successful in promoting our suffering, so the world would show sympathy to us and not sympathize with the Arab terrorists who attack, kill and maim us Jews in Israel. Is this too much to ask?

I thought of Tamar Fogel:

Tamar Fogel, the 12-year-old girl from the Jewish settlement of Itamar who discovered the murders of her parents and three siblings when she came home last Friday night from her youth movement, speaks with Israel’s Channel 2 during her shiva for her family.

Watch this incredibly inspiring and heart-wrenching interview.



Visit Shiloh Musings.

On 16th Birthday, Pakistani Girl Shot in Head Speaks at UN (VIDEO)

Saturday, July 13th, 2013

Last fall Islamist terrorists tried to murder a young Pakistani school girl by shooting her in the head at close-range after climbing aboard the school bus in which she was traveling.  Malala Yousafzai, the object of an assassination attempt because she promoted education for girls, has recovered from her wounds and has defeated her would-be assassins.

On Friday, July 12 – her 16th birthday – Malala Yousafzai received standing ovations when she gave a speech to the United Nations.  She  said education is the only way to save lives:

Let us pick up our books and pens. They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one pen and one book can change the world. Education is the only solution.

Although only 15 years old, Yousafzai and her campaign to promote education for girls was so threatening to the Taliban that assassins were sent to murder her as she traveled in a school bus.

Actually, Yousafzai was perceived as a threat for several years before the Taliban shot her.

When only 11 years old she wrote an anonymous blog for the BBC in which she championed the cause of education for girls, which is banned by the Taliban.

Over time, her identity became known as she continued writing and speaking out.  In 2011 Yousafzai received Pakistan’s National Youth Peace Price and was even nominated by Archbishop Desmond Tutu for the International Children’s Peace Prize.

As expected, the more attention Yousafzai brought to her cause, the more of a threat she became.  Eventually there were death threats against her.  And then, on October 9, 2012, the threatened acts were carried out.

The attack drew the attention of the world as her rescue and recovery, first in Pakistan and then in England, were closely followed.  For some time it was unclear whether Yousafzai could recover from the attack, but it is clear from her appearance on Friday that not only has she recovered, she is stronger and more determined than ever.

“The extremists were, and they are, afraid of books and pens,” Yousafzai said. “The power of education frightens them. They are afraid of women.”  There were 500 people in the audience at Friday’s speech.

Friday was declared Malala Day by the U.N., but Malala said it was “not my day,” but a day for every woman, boy and girl struggling for their rights.

“Thousands of people have been killed by the terrorists and millions have been injured,” she said. “I am just one of them. So here I stand, one girl among many.”

“I speak not for myself but for those without voice … those who have fought for their rights — their right to live in peace, their right to be treated with dignity, their right to equality of opportunity, their right to be educated.”

Yousafzai is a symbol of strength through adversity.  She said it best in her own words.

On October 9, 2012 the Taliban shot me in the left side of my forehead.  They shot my friends, too.  The thought the bullets would silence us.  But they failed.

Weakness, fear, hopelessnes died.   Strength, power and courage was born.

Watch her whole speech here.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/on-16th-birthday-pakistani-girl-shot-in-head-speaks-at-un-video/2013/07/13/

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